Horace Bristol: An American View

Horace Bristol: An American View

by Horace Bristol, Debra Heimerdinger
     
 

In the tradition of the great photographic populists Alfred Eisenstaedt and Dorothea Lange, Horace Bristol used his camera to record the human, intimate movements in the grand sweep of history. Bristol's American view included the best and the worst of this century, from poignant images of the urban poor and migrant farm workers during the Depression to the battle… See more details below

Overview

In the tradition of the great photographic populists Alfred Eisenstaedt and Dorothea Lange, Horace Bristol used his camera to record the human, intimate movements in the grand sweep of history. Bristol's American view included the best and the worst of this century, from poignant images of the urban poor and migrant farm workers during the Depression to the battle scenes of World War II and compelling portraits of post-war Japan and Southeast Asia. One of the first staff photographers for Life magazine, Bristol was tireless in his pursuit of the revelatory image. Wildly prolific in the thirties and forties, he later gave up photography, and his work languished in obscurity for nearly thirty years. Recently rediscovered, Bristol has come to be recognized as one of the most important photographers of the twentieth century. This volume presents over one hundred twenty exquisitely reproduced duotone images by Bristol, ranging from his early San Francisco photographs to his last work, taken in Southeast Asia. Combining aesthetic purity with human interest, Horace Bristol's pioneering photography is imbued with an accuracy, strength of composition, and humility that is as striking today as it was groundbreaking in its time.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

--Star Tribune, December 1996
Horace Bristol: An American View brings to light the work of an almost-forgotten master. Bristol was part of a 1930s San Francisco circle that included Ansel Adams, Edward Weston and Dorothea Lange, and worked at Life as one of its first staff photographers with Margret Bourke-White and Alfred Eisenstadt. He also was one of five photographers under the direction of Edward Steichen who documented World War II for the Navy. After returning to Japan to live after the war, Bristol, along with David Douglas Duncan, pioneered the move from German lenses to Nikon. Bristol's work almost was lost, however, when devastated by his wife's death from an overdose of sleeping pills in 1956, he burned all the negatives and photgraphs he had at his Japanese home and ended his career. Remnants of his work that remained were locked away in a trunk for almost 30 years. This monograph, 120 superb duotone images compiled by Debra Heimerdinger and Ken Conner represents the first major publication of Bristol's work covering all stages of his career. Especially notable are photographs Bristol took in California in the 1930s with John Steinbeck while the author was researching The Grapes of Wrath, and of servicemen during the war in the South Pacific.

Especially notable are photographs Bristol took in California in the 1930s with John Steinbeck while the author was researching The Grapes of Wrath. Star Tribune

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780811812610
Publisher:
Chronicle Books LLC
Publication date:
02/29/2000
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
9.22(w) x 11.04(h) x 0.48(d)

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