Hormones and the Heart in Health and Disease / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$169.76
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $112.00
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 55%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (6) from $112.00   
  • New (3) from $118.34   
  • Used (3) from $112.00   

Overview

Leonard Share and a panel of distinguished clinicians and investigators critically review what is known about the effects of endogenous hormones and other chemical agents that act upon and/or are secreted by the heart. Among the humoral factors reviewed in depth are ANP, adrenomedullin, urocortin, vasopressin, and insulin, as well as the autocoids, endothelin, nitric oxide, estrogen, and the eicosanoids. Also illuminated are the roles played by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, by the autonomic nervous system, and by the kallikrein-kinin system in the functioning of the heart. Offers physiologists, pharmacologists, and academic cardiologists powerful insights into the hormonal factors that modulate cardiac performance in health and disease. Contributing substantially to our understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart, this important book is certain to serve as the new standard reference for all those involved in basic and clinical cardiovascular studies as well as in developing today's novel cardiotherapeutics.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

In this book the topic of endocrinology is broadly interpreted in order to consider traditional hormones as well as autocoids that are secreted by the heart or that act upon it. The heart is not the only target for the direct and indirect actions of many hormones and humoral factors, but it is an endocrine organ in the traditional sense, synthesizing and secreting chemical factors into circulation to act at distant sites. Many topics are addressed, such as the synthesization of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and adrenomedullin, the role of the autonomic nervous system in the pumping of the heart, and antidiuretic hormones such as vasopressin. This is a comprehensive survey and evaluation of the hormonal and autocrine factors that modulate cardiac performance in health and disease.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Irwin Klein, MD (Northshore University Hospital)
Description: Anatomists and physiologists have described the classic endocrine organs as those that release hormones that act at distant sites. The importance of the many individual hormones to regulate a multitude of homeostatic processes is well known. It is well accepted that the heart and vascular systems are important end-organs for hormone action and many disease states involving changes in hormone secretion are recognized for their effects on this system. In this book, the editor has enlisted the aid of 29 contributors to address fourteen different areas in which hormones can potentially alter cardiovascular physiology.
Purpose: The editor states that the purpose is to systematically review a variety of specific hormones as they affect both normal and pathologic states. The attempt to further our understanding of the regulation of cardiac function is clearly laudable and in each chapter the contributors make a significant contribution to the basic understanding of how a variety of molecules including nitric oxide, the eicosanoids, and the recently identified adrenomedullin can act on the heart and systemic vasculature.
Audience: While the title suggests a clinical bent, it appears that this book is primarily directed to basic scientists. The linchpin chapter deals with naturetic peptides and the heart. The reader is guided through the molecular biology of the structure and processing of the various cardiac derived naturetic peptides, and a discussion of the transcriptional regulation is provided. This forms the basis for understanding the regulation of the naturetic peptides in the pathologic states of cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and myocardial infarction. Unfortunately the vast majority of this work is directed at the cell, organ, and intact animal and those observations which have been made in the human disease states or the clinical implications of that work are not fully explored.
Features: Each of the contributors is an acknowledged expert in the field and the chapters are carefully prepared and contain sufficient citations to make these contributions of reference value. The chapter on estrogen and the heart stands out from the others in that it is primarily clinically oriented and quickly departs from molecular biology and the effects of estrogen to a very useful clinical discussion. This includes the clinical findings of estrogen on vasomotor tone, echocardiography and other measures of myocardial contractility, and on changes in lipid levels in patients receiving estrogen replacement and contrasting that to estrogen deficiency. The comprehensive nature of the book is further supported by the review of renin-angiotensin, endothelin, and insulin. The emphasis in most of these chapters is on the more basic issues such as glucose transport in the heart rather than incorporation of the recent important clinical data dealing with pathologic bases for diabetic cardiomyopathy (if one exists) or on the alterations in insulin sensitivity, lipid metabolism, blood pressure, and atherosclerosis, which form an important metabolic syndrome.
Assessment: I find this book to be useful as a reference source and also for its completeness. I am personally disappointed to find that in any discussion of the effects of hormones on the heart that one of the most recognized and well established areas, that of thyroid hormone (and its effects on the heart and cardiovascular system), is not discussed. Nor is the recent and potentially clinically important data of the role of growth hormone and cardiac function reviewed. The field of cardiovascular endocrinology is moving forward and this book does make an important contribution, however, the clinician may need to look elsewhere to fully understand the significance of this evolving field.
Irwin Klein
Anatomists and physiologists have described the classic endocrine organs as those that release hormones that act at distant sites. The importance of the many individual hormones to regulate a multitude of homeostatic processes is well known. It is well accepted that the heart and vascular systems are important end-organs for hormone action and many disease states involving changes in hormone secretion are recognized for their effects on this system. In this book, the editor has enlisted the aid of 29 contributors to address fourteen different areas in which hormones can potentially alter cardiovascular physiology. The editor states that the purpose is to systematically review a variety of specific hormones as they affect both normal and pathologic states. The attempt to further our understanding of the regulation of cardiac function is clearly laudable and in each chapter the contributors make a significant contribution to the basic understanding of how a variety of molecules including nitric oxide, the eicosanoids, and the recently identified adrenomedullin can act on the heart and systemic vasculature. While the title suggests a clinical bent, it appears that this book is primarily directed to basic scientists. The linchpin chapter deals with naturetic peptides and the heart. The reader is guided through the molecular biology of the structure and processing of the various cardiac derived naturetic peptides, and a discussion of the transcriptional regulation is provided. This forms the basis for understanding the regulation of the naturetic peptides in the pathologic states of cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and myocardial infarction. Unfortunately the vast majority ofthis work is directed at the cell, organ, and intact animal and those observations which have been made in the human disease states or the clinical implications of that work are not fully explored. Each of the contributors is an acknowledged expert in the field and the chapters are carefully prepared and contain sufficient citations to make these contributions of reference value. The chapter on estrogen and the heart stands out from the others in that it is primarily clinically oriented and quickly departs from molecular biology and the effects of estrogen to a very useful clinical discussion. This includes the clinical findings of estrogen on vasomotor tone, echocardiography and other measures of myocardial contractility, and on changes in lipid levels in patients receiving estrogen replacement and contrasting that to estrogen deficiency. The comprehensive nature of the book is further supported by the review of renin-angiotensin, endothelin, and insulin. The emphasis in most of these chapters is on the more basic issues such as glucose transport in the heart rather than incorporation of the recent important clinical data dealing with pathologic bases for diabetic cardiomyopathy (if one exists) or on the alterations in insulin sensitivity, lipid metabolism, blood pressure, and atherosclerosis, which form an important metabolic syndrome. I find this book to be useful as a reference source and also for its completeness. I am personally disappointed to find that in any discussion of the effects of hormones on the heart that one of the most recognized and well established areas, that of thyroid hormone (and its effects on the heart and cardiovascular system), is not discussed. Nor is the recent and potentially clinically important data of the role of growth hormone and cardiac function reviewed. The field of cardiovascular endocrinology is moving forward and this book does make an important contribution, however, the clinician may need to look elsewhere to fully understand the significance of this evolving field.
Booknews
Clinicians and researchers critically review what is known about the effects of endogenous hormones and other chemical agents that act upon the heart and/or are secreted by it. They include discussions of the humoral factors atrial natriuretic peptide, adrenomedullin, urocortin, vasopressin, and insulin as well as the autocoids, endothelin, nitric oxide, estrogen, and the eicosanoids. They also consider the roles played by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, by the autonomic nervous system, and by the kallikrein-kinin system in the functioning of the heart. The treatment might prove useful to professionals in any specialty that deals with the heart. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

3 Stars from Doody
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780896037267
  • Publisher: Springer-Verlag New York, LLC
  • Publication date: 6/1/1999
  • Series: Contemporary Endocrinology Series , #21
  • Edition description: 1999
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 258
  • Product dimensions: 10.00 (w) x 7.00 (h) x 0.63 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface
Contributors
1 Natriuretic Peptides and the Heart 1
2 Adrenomedullin and the Heart 21
3 Cardiac and Vascular Actions of Urocortin 39
4 The Renin-Angiotensin System and the Heart 53
5 Adrenocortical Hormones and the Heart: A Steroidogenic Endocrine Organ as Well as Target Organ? 69
6 Catecholamines and the Heart 81
7 Vasopressin and the Heart 103
8 Insulin and the Heart 115
9 Kinins in the Heart 137
10 Endothelin and the Heart 159
11 Nitric Oxide and the Heart 175
12 Contribution of Eicosanoids in the Heart 195
13 Estrogen and the Heart 219
14 Androgen and Estrogen Effects on Plasma Lipids in Men 235
Index 253
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)