Horowitz Live and Unedited: The Historic 1965 Carnegie Hall Return Concert

Horowitz Live and Unedited: The Historic 1965 Carnegie Hall Return Concert

by Vladimir Horowitz
     
 

In 1953, after one of his regular Carnegie Hall recitals, Vladimir Horowitz unexpectedly retired from public performances. He disappeared for 12 long years. Then, just as suddenly as he left, the great Russian-born virtuoso came back on May 9, 1965, with a Carnegie Hall recital. The announcement of the pianist's return caused aSee more details below

Overview

In 1953, after one of his regular Carnegie Hall recitals, Vladimir Horowitz unexpectedly retired from public performances. He disappeared for 12 long years. Then, just as suddenly as he left, the great Russian-born virtuoso came back on May 9, 1965, with a Carnegie Hall recital. The announcement of the pianist's return caused a sensation, and the concert itself was one of the most exciting in the hall's illustrious history. Luckily, the folks at Columbia Records (now Sony Classical) had the good sense to have their microphones in place. But after the event, Horowitz-the-perfectionist insisted on "touching up" some slipped notes before the record's release. The album was rushed to stores and won three Grammy Awards that year, but the touch-ups provoked some amount of controversy among pianophiles. Now, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of Horowitz's birth, Sony is releasing that legendary, unedited performance for the first time. And, the controversy aside, there is perhaps no better document of the Horowitz mystique, for even the softest passages seem charged with an electrical current. Fans of the pianist will certainly be eager to compare this with the original release, but those new to his art will find this the perfect starting point. The program itself is quite varied and includes many Horowitz specialties, including Schumann's Fantasy in C, Chopin's G Minor Ballade, Scriabin's "Black Mass" Sonata, and four marvelous encores, including Schumann's "Träumerei," which could be called his signature piece. The new digital restoration is thrillingly vivid, and the set comes with a bonus DVD that includes outtakes from the 1987 documentary Horowitz: The Last Romantic.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Patsy Morita
Horowitz's 1965 return to public performance after 12 years of just studio work is presented here as originally recorded, including the wrong notes he played. Yes, nervousness is a problem even for such a well-known and expert musician. For previous releases of this Carnegie Hall recital, Horowitz re-recorded a few of the more obvious errors. The album begins with the storm of applause that greeted Horowitz when he stepped (or was gently pushed, according to some) out on-stage. Within the very first notes of Busoni's transcription of Bach's "Toccata, Adagio & Fugue, BWV 564," there is a major clinker. However, he continues, and the beautiful Adagio alone is reason enough for the second shower of applause at the end of the work. There is another major loss of concentration in the second movement of the Schumann "Fantasy," but by the Scriabin, Horowitz is himself, subtly interpreting the shifting moods of the "Black Mass Sonata," and he finishes with the beautiful Chopin piece. The encores, which begin with Debussy's "Serenade for the Doll" from the "Children's Corner Suite," are all at once personal interpretations and audience charmers. It is Horowitz's ability give meaningful interpretations to the music, even with the occasional wrong note, that makes him a great performer.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/30/2003
Label:
Sony
UPC:
0827969302323
catalogNumber:
93023
Rank:
66361

Tracks

  1. Toccatas, transcriptions (2) for piano in D minor & C major (BWV 564/565; BBGA 7/3), KiV B29  - Ferruccio Busoni  - Vladimir Horowitz  - Roxanne Slimak
  2. Fantasie (Obolen auf Beethovens Monument) for piano in C major, Op. 17  - Robert Schumann  - Vladimir Horowitz  - Roxanne Slimak
  3. Piano Sonata No. 9 in F major ("Black Mass"), Op. 68  - Alexander Scriabin  - Vladimir Horowitz  - Roxanne Slimak
  4. Poème for piano in F sharp major, Op. 32/1  - Alexander Scriabin  - Vladimir Horowitz  - Roxanne Slimak
  5. Mazurka for piano No. 21 in C sharp minor, Op. 30/4, CT. 71  - Frédéric Chopin  - Vladimir Horowitz  - Roxanne Slimak
  6. Etude for piano No. 8 in F major, Op. 10/8, CT. 21  - Frédéric Chopin  - Vladimir Horowitz  - Roxanne Slimak
  7. Ballade for piano No. 1 in G minor, Op. 23, CT. 2  - Frédéric Chopin  - Vladimir Horowitz  - Roxanne Slimak
  8. Children's Corner, suite for piano (or orchestra), L. 113: 3. Serenade for the Doll  - Claude Debussy  - Vladimir Horowitz  - Roxanne Slimak
  9. Etude for piano in C sharp minor, Op. 2/1  - Alexander Scriabin  - Vladimir Horowitz  - Roxanne Slimak
  10. Études de virtuosité (15), for piano ("Per Aspera ad Astra"), Op. 72: No. 11 in A flat major  - Moritz Moszkowski  - Vladimir Horowitz  - Roxanne Slimak
  11. Kinderszenen No. 7 ("Träumerei"), for piano, Op. 15/7  - Robert Schumann  - Vladimir Horowitz  - Roxanne Slimak
  12. Kinderszenen (Scenes from Childhood) for piano, Op. 15  - Robert Schumann  - Vladimir Horowitz  - Roxanne Slimak

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