Horror International

Overview

As global cinema becomes increasingly difficult to distinguish, characterizations of horror films from various geographical and cultural locations seem more fluid and transitional than ever before. However, this does not mean denying the existence of national features that affect and are reflected in horror films, whether from an artistic or a reception standpoint. Horror is one of the most studied genres in cinema, yet none of the many books on the subject focus on films or traditions outside the United States ...

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Overview

As global cinema becomes increasingly difficult to distinguish, characterizations of horror films from various geographical and cultural locations seem more fluid and transitional than ever before. However, this does not mean denying the existence of national features that affect and are reflected in horror films, whether from an artistic or a reception standpoint. Horror is one of the most studied genres in cinema, yet none of the many books on the subject focus on films or traditions outside the United States or the United Kingdom. While Italian, Japanese, Mexican, German, and Hong Kong horror films have received a modicum of critical recognition, the areas of Egyptian, Romanian, Belgian, Dutch, New Zealand, and Thai horror all still need—in fact, demand—some attention.

Horror International seeks to rectify this by giving the global perspectives and cross-cultural dynamics of world horror cinema its due. This groundbreaking collection of eighteen original essays examine a myriad of films, showing how each draws from Hollywood horror conventions and also local cinematic traditions, local folklore, and national historical and cultural concerns. The production, marketing, and reception of various national cinemas are also addressed, demonstrating how these films are understood by different audiences worldwide. This in turn sheds new light on the original cultural production of many works and their subsequent "translations" and meanings in different national contexts. The diverse and highly informative essays in Horror International will engross both scholars and fans of horror films and finally illuminate the distinct multicultural factors of this exciting cinematic genre.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Steven Jay Schneider is a PhD candidate in cinema studies at New York University. He is editor of Fear Without Frontiers: Horror Cinema across the Globe (FAB Press, 2003) and New Hollywood Violence (Manchester University Press, 2004).

Tony Williams is professor and area head of film studies in the English department of Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. He is author of The Cinema of George A. Romero: Knight of the Living Dead (Wallflower Press, 2003) and Body and Soul: The Cinematic Vision of Robert Aldrich (Scarecrow Press, 2004).

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Table of Contents

Introduction 1
1 Blood and black gloves on shiny discs : new media, old tastes, and the remediation of Italian horror films in the United States 15
2 Importation/mexploitation, or, how a crime-fighting, vampire-slaying Mexican wrestler almost found himself in an Italian sword-and-sandals epic 33
3 The dialogue with American popular culture in two German films about the serial killer 56
4 The return of history as horror : Onibaba and the atomic bomb 83
5 "Terror australis" : areas of horror in the Australian cinema 98
6 Kiwi gothic : New Zealand's cinema of a perilous paradise 114
7 Irish horror : Neil Jordan and the Anglo-Irish gothic 128
8 Thailand haunted : the power of the past in the contemporary Thai horror film 141
9 The Spanish horror film as subversive text : Eloy de la Iglesia's La semana del asesino 163
10 Genre bending and gender bonding : masculinity and repression in Dutch "thriller" cinema 180
11 Hong Kong social horror : tragedy and farce in Category 3 203
12 Beyond Dracula and Ceausescu : phenomenology of horror in Romanian cinema 220
13 Snapping up schoolgirls : legitimation crisis in recent Canadian horror 235
14 Beyond the genre formula : implicit horror in the films of Jan Svankmajer 259
15 Egypt : a cinema without horror? 273
16 Burn, witch, burn : a first look at the Scandinavian horror film 290
17 Man bites dog and the critical reception of Belgian horror (in) cinema 315
18 Exorcising the devil : Russian cinema and horror 336
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