Horror Zone: The Cultural Experience of Contemporary Horror Cinema

Overview

In his landmark Introduction to the American Horror Film, Robin Wood noted that horror "has consistently been one of the most popular and, at the same time, the most disreputable of Hollywood genres." Horror is still immensely popular but its assimilation into our culture continues apace. In Horror Zone, leading international writers on horror take horror out into the world beyond cinema screens to explore the interconnections between the films and modern media and entertainment industries, economies and ...

See more details below
Paperback
$28.45
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$31.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (7) from $15.09   
  • New (4) from $15.09   
  • Used (3) from $19.15   
Sending request ...

Overview

In his landmark Introduction to the American Horror Film, Robin Wood noted that horror "has consistently been one of the most popular and, at the same time, the most disreputable of Hollywood genres." Horror is still immensely popular but its assimilation into our culture continues apace. In Horror Zone, leading international writers on horror take horror out into the world beyond cinema screens to explore the interconnections between the films and modern media and entertainment industries, economies and production practices, cultural and political forums, spectators and fans. They critically examine the ways in which the horror genre functions in all its multifarious forms, for example the Friday the 13th films as modern grand guignol, the relationship between the contemporary horror film and the theme park ride, horror as art house cinema, connections between pornography and the horror film and the place of special effects in this most respectable of Hollywood genres.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781848851511
  • Publisher: I. B.Tauris & Company, Limited
  • Publication date: 12/15/2009
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Ian Conrich is Director of the Centre for New Zealand Studies, Birkbeck, University of London. His books include The Cinema of John Carpenter: The Technique of Terror (2004), Film's Musical Moments (2006), and Contemporary New Zealand Cinema (I.B. Tauris, 2008).

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

* Introduction — Ian Conrich
• Industry, Technology and the New Media
• Dark Rides, Hybrid Machines and the Horror Experience — Angela Ndalianis (University of Melbourne, Australia)
• High Concept Thrills and Chills: The Horror Blockbuster — Stacey Abbott, (Roehampton University, UK)
• Bringing it All Back Home: Horror Cinema and Video Culture — Linda Badley, (Middle Tennessee State University, US)
• Audiences, Fans, and Consumption
• Stalking the Web: Celebration, Chat and Horror Film Marketing on the Internet — Brigid Cherry, (St Mary's College, UK)
• Attending Horror Film Festivals and Conventions: Liveness, Subcultural Capital and "Flesh-and-Blood Genre Communities". Matt Hills (University of Cardiff, UK)
• Trashing the Academy: Taste, Excess and an Emerging Politics of Cinematic Style — Jeffrey Sconce (Northwestern University, US)
• Terrifying Toys and Tie-ins: The Material Culture of Horror Cinema — Ian Conrich (Birkbeck, University of London, UK)
• Manufacture and Design
• They're Here!: Special Effects in the Horror Cinema of the 1970s and 1980s — Ernest Mathijs (University of British Columbia, Canada)
• Making Up Monsters: Set and Costume Design in Horror Films. Tamao Nakahara (University of California, Berkeley, US)
• Culture Wars: Some New Trends in Art Horror — Joan Hawkins (University of Indiana, US)
• Boundaries of Horror
• “Parts is Parts”: Pornography, Splatter Films and the Politics of Corporeal Disintegration — Jay Mcroy (University of Wisconsin, Parkside, US)
• Nazi Horror Films — Julian Petley (Brunel University, UK)
• Better the Devil You Know: Antichrists at the Millennium — Mick Broderick (Murdoch University, Australia)
• Feminine Boundaries: Adolescence, Witchcraft and Magic in Contemporary Cinema and Television — Estella Tincknell (University of the West of England)
• Impaired Visions: the Cultural and Cinematic Politics of Blindness in the Horror Film — Angela Marie Smith (University of Utah, US)
• Notes
• Bibliography
• Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)