Horse Power: A History of the Horse and Donkey in Human Societies

Overview

If not for a horse, would Alexander have been the Great? William, the Conqueror? Richard, the Lionhearted? If not for their awesome mounts, would the Spaniards have had their way with the New World? Would Paul Revere have spread the word? Would the West have been won? It is hard to comprehend how far horse power has carried us, difficult to imagine, in our era of mechanical wizardry and speed, what role the horse has played in shaping human history. This is the challenge Juliet Clutton-Brock takes up in her book,...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (8) from $9.22   
  • New (2) from $99.00   
  • Used (6) from $0.00   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$99.00
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(362)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$114.80
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(213)

Condition: New

Ships from: Chicago, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

If not for a horse, would Alexander have been the Great? William, the Conqueror? Richard, the Lionhearted? If not for their awesome mounts, would the Spaniards have had their way with the New World? Would Paul Revere have spread the word? Would the West have been won? It is hard to comprehend how far horse power has carried us, difficult to imagine, in our era of mechanical wizardry and speed, what role the horse has played in shaping human history. This is the challenge Juliet Clutton-Brock takes up in her book, a splendid blend of natural and social history that recounts the horse's story as it has figured in - and transfigured - our own. By drawing on biological, archaeological, and historical evidence, Clutton-Brock describes the wild horse and the wild ass, from their widespread distribution at the end of the last Ice Age to their near extinction today. She shows how these beasts, once hunted for meat, were drafted for work and domesticated as humans began to grasp the possibilities of riding horseback. This discovery, with the speed, distance, and power it offered, transformed the course of history. This elegant tale of the horse and donkey, wonderfully written and handsomely illustrated, revives the true meaning of "horse power." Juliet Clutton-Brock, senior scientist in the Department of Zoology at The Natural History Museum, London, and author of several fine books on domesticated animals, provocatively shows us what a force the horse has been in determining how we live.

If not for a horse, would Alexander have been "the Great"? Would William have been "the Conqueror" or Richard, "the Lionhearted"? If not for a horse, would Paul Revere have spread the word? Would the West have been won? These are questions Clutton-Brock answers in this blend of natural and social history which recounts the horse's story as it has figured in with our own. 22 color illustrations; 91 halftones; 48 line drawings.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Although the rather dull title implies this is a pedantic work, this book is thoroughly absorbing and filled with facts of major interest. For example, the practice of nostril splitting, which helps the horse to breathe better, is well documented both in text and illustrations. Clutton-Brock, a scientist in the Department of Zoology at the British Museum, writes in a scholarly yet very readable style. At the heart of her thesis is proof that the horse and the ass, the only two members of the Equidae family to be domesticated, contributed to the shaping of human history. Offering a historical account of their development, complete with archaeological evidence and excellent illustrations, Clutton-Brock has written a splendid history of both. Highly recommended for science and natural history collections as well as collections focusing on veterinary medicine.-- Anne A. Salter, Atlanta Historical Soc . Lib.
Booknews
A beautifully written and illustrated (both color and b&w) account of the close association that human beings have had with the horse and the ass for many thousands of years. Clutton-Brock is a senior scientist at the Natural History Museum, London. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674406469
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 11/1/1992
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 8.07 (w) x 10.20 (h) x 0.78 (d)

Meet the Author

Juliet Clutton-Brock is Senior Scientist in the Department of Zoology at the British Museum of Natural History.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements 8
Preface 9
Introduction: The role of horsepower in the evolution of ancient civilizations 11
Pt. I Wild Horses and Asses 16
I The family Equidae 17
Reproduction 19
Teeth and food 20
Behaviour 22
Equids as hunters' prey at the end of the last ice age 24
2 Wild horses and asses in historic times 26
Wild horses 26
The tarpan, Equus ferus ferus 26
Przewalski's horse, Equus ferus przewalskii 30
Wild asses 33
The African wild asses, Equus africanus 33
The Asiatic wild asses, Equus hemionus and Equus kiang 36
Feral horses and asses 38
Pt. II Equids That Are Without Pride of Ancestry or Hope of Posterity 41
3 Hybrids and the breeding of mules 42
Hybrid vigour 42
The first 'mules' 43
Mules and hinnies 44
Telegony 46
Zebra hybrids 47
The bell-mare 49
Poitou mules 50
The beast of burden 50
Pt. III History of the Domestic Horse, Donkey and Mule 52
4 The earliest domestication of the horse and the ass 53
The horse 53
The ass 62
5 The first wheeled transport, horse-riding, the stirrup, and nose-slitting 67
The need for transport and traction 67
The first carts and waggons 68
Wheel-making 70
Harness 71
Control of the equids 72
Horseshoes 73
Horse-riding and the stirrup 73
Slitting the nostrils of equids 77
6 Equids in ancient Egypt and western Asia, and the enigma of the onager 80
The enigma of the onager, Equus hemionus. Was it ever domesticated? 87
Textual evidence for equids in third millennium BC Mesopotamia 89
The Assyrian palace reliefs 90
Horses and asses in the Old Testament 92
7 The horses of Scythia and the Orient 96
Scythian nomads in the first millennium BC 97
Equids in the Orient 102
8 Equids in the classical world 106
Cavalry in ancient Greece 107
Horses in ancient Greek pageantry and sport 112
Cavalry in ancient Rome 113
Equids in Roman agriculture and transport 117
9 Equids in the Middle Ages 121
The horse in feudal Europe 121
The great raids of the Magyars 124
The art of venery 124
The battle of Hastings and the Bayeux tapestry 125
The Crusades 129
Genghis Khan (1162-1227) and the Mongol hordes 133
The travels of Marco Polo (1254-1324) 134
The economics of horsepower in the Middle Ages 136
10 Conquest of the Americas 140
The extinct species 141
Introduction of the domestic horse 143
Native Americans become horsemen 144
Nomadic horsemen in North America 145
The horsemen of South America 148
The ethos of the cowboy and the ranch 151
11 Equids in agriculture, transport, exploration, and warfare 154
Animals for plough and traction AD 1100-1800 154
The emergence of the heavy draught horse 156
Working ponies and the horse trade 156
The age of improvement 158
Exploration 160
British cavalry since 1800 162
12 A history of horse-racing 165
The Homeric chariot race 165
The Olympic Games 167
The Roman chariot race 168
Horse-racing in Britain from AD 1100 to Eclipse 170
Influence of the Arab and the early Thoroughbreds 172
Conclusions 178
Appendix: Nomenclature of the family Equidae as used in this book 182
References and publications for further reading 184
Index 189
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)