The Horse Who Drank the Sky: Film Experience Beyond Narrative and Theory [NOOK Book]

Overview


What is most important about cinema is that we are alive with it. For all its dramatic, literary, political, sociological, and philosophical weight, film is ultimately an art that provokes, touches, and riddles the viewer through an image that transcends narrative and theory. In The Horse Who Drank the Sky, Murray Pomerance brings attention to the visceral dimension of movies and presents a new and unanticipated way of thinking about what happens when we watch them.

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The Horse Who Drank the Sky: Film Experience Beyond Narrative and Theory

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Overview


What is most important about cinema is that we are alive with it. For all its dramatic, literary, political, sociological, and philosophical weight, film is ultimately an art that provokes, touches, and riddles the viewer through an image that transcends narrative and theory. In The Horse Who Drank the Sky, Murray Pomerance brings attention to the visceral dimension of movies and presents a new and unanticipated way of thinking about what happens when we watch them.

By looking at point of view, the gaze, the voice from nowhere, diegesis and its discontents, ideology, the system of the apparatus, invisible editing, and the technique of overlapping sound, he argues that it is often the minuscule or transitional moments in motion pictures that penetrate most deeply into viewers' experiences. In films that include Rebel Without a Cause, Dead Man, Chinatown, The Graduate, North by Northwest, Dinner at Eight, Jaws, M, Stage Fright, Saturday Night Fever, The Band Wagon, The Bourne Identity, and dozens more, Pomerance invokes complexities that many of the best of critics have rarely tackled and opens a revealing view of some of the most astonishing moments in cinema.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813544960
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press
  • Publication date: 4/24/2008
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 278
  • File size: 2 MB

Table of Contents

Overture 1

1 Thinking about the studios at Neubabelsberg

The Dreamers, Doris Day, the predicament of the "onlooker," Now, Voyager, and Dead Man A Voluptuous Gaze 10

Thinking about a dream of Sandra Oh, Short Cuts, Safe, Sideways, The Lookout, Disturbia, The Dead Zone, the gaze or the glance turning away from film, the "cinema of attractions," glancing at plot, Magnolia, battle effects, Rebecca, Requiem for a Heavyweight, Gojira, "panoramic perception," and vertiginous games

2 The Hero in the China Sea 36

Thinking about Nicholas Ray's filmmaking, storylines and lines of action, performance and continuity, and Rebel Without a Cause

3 A Great Face 62

Thinking about Alfred Hitchcock, North by Northwest, monuments and legalities, Mount Rushmore, stereopticons and the rear-projection process, Gary Cooper, George W. Bush, James Stewart, and Cary Grant

4 The Smoke and the Knife 86

Thinking about Fritz Lang's M, police procedure, craft thieving, the rationality of smoke, women in Weimar Germany, motherhood and surveillance, severing and civilization

5 A Callfrom Everywhere 110

Thinking about On the Beach, The Exorcist, acousmetre: the voice that cannot be seen, The Wizard of Oz, And the Ship Sails On ... , The Man Who Knew Too Much, Pan's Labyrinth, Trafic, narrative and de-acousmatization, and Stage Fright

6 As Time Goes By 139

Thinking about cinematic transitions, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Lawrence of Arabia and the pre-lap, The Passenger, Blackmail, The Graduate, "faux pre-lap" in Chinatown, Three Days of the Condor, The Conversation, the upholstering buffer, the acousmetre passe, the "gasp" and the "turn," From Russia with Love, The Bourne Identity,Saturday Night Fever, editing and sound in the 1970s, Stanley Kubrick and Nestor Almendros

7 The Speaking Eye 166

Thinking about the speaking eye, the democratic screen, Jaws, animal performance, acting and authenticity, falling out of role, cinematic realism and cinematic reality, My Man Godfrey, Mischa Auer, "reading" the screen, the morality and politics of watching, the "doctrine of natural expression," the filmmaker's will, and cinematic "importance"

8 Not an Unusual Story 187

Thinking about Vertigo, Dinner at Eight, the sound revolution, John Barrymore, The Last Laugh, class structure and the comedy of manners, modernity and social collapse, The Great Depression and ressentiment, writing that obliterates the writer, "looking marvelous," performance and biography, and the acting of Marie Dressler

9 The Horse Who Drank the Sky 206

Thinking about the cinematic sense of place, fragmentation, shellshock, explosions in cinema, Babel, Until the End of the World, Royal Wedding, extraterritoriality and television, Fahrenheit 451, the coup d'oeil, Sergeant York, "invisible landscapes," theater design and "marginal appreciation," mental vertigo, The Bourne Supremacy, Tourettic cinema, Blow-Up, color, and The Band Wagon

Works Cited and Consulted 235

Index 247

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