A Horse's Tale: A Colonial Williamsburg Adventure

Overview


In association with the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

Readers will make new friends as they learn about colonial America.

Garrick the Gardener’s horse is sad, so the town of Williamsburg rallies to try to cheer him up! Margaret the Milliner sews a counterpane for the horse’s back, and Ben the Blacksmith checks the horseshoes to make sure they aren’t on too tight. The grocer mixes oats and sugar, the apothecary stirs a special brew, and the...

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Overview


In association with the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

Readers will make new friends as they learn about colonial America.

Garrick the Gardener’s horse is sad, so the town of Williamsburg rallies to try to cheer him up! Margaret the Milliner sews a counterpane for the horse’s back, and Ben the Blacksmith checks the horseshoes to make sure they aren’t on too tight. The grocer mixes oats and sugar, the apothecary stirs a special brew, and the music teacher even sings a happy song. But nothing lifts the horse’s spirits until they all discover that friendship is the best cure.

A fun way for children to learn about life in colonial times, A Horse’s Tale includes a glossary that highlights period words and terms and features the adorable characters first created as plush toys by Merrymakers, Inc. Young readers will take a step back in time to Colonial Williamsburg as they meet a group of friends they will want to make their own.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1- Several residents of Colonial Williamsburg do their best to find out what is ailing Garrick the Gardener's horse. In a rhyming text, the characters are introduced and briefly described in terms of how they try to help the animal. The blacksmith checks its shoes, the milliner sews a blanket, the apothecary makes a special brew, etc. Through it all, the town crier acts as narrator, summing up the action. A glossary goes into more detail about the jobs, items, and places found in this colonial settlement. The watercolor and pen-and-ink illustrations depict all of the participants as cheerful cuddly animals who talk and dress as people. The two horses in the story, however, do not talk and do not have clothes. That lack of consistency probably will not bother the intended audience, nor will the conclusion that Lancer needs a friend and will be happier pulling the gardener's cart if Mary the mare comes along, too. This book would make a nice introduction to Williamsburg for very young visitors.-Lucinda Snyder Whitehurst, St. Christopher's School, Richmond, VA

Kirkus Reviews
Garrick the Gardener's horse runs away, sulks and refuses to work, and no one knows what to do. The Blacksmith checks his shoes. The Apothecary mixes herbs. The music teacher sings him a song. The town crier-readers are, after all, in Colonial Williamsburg-cheerfully announces the failure of each attempt. In the end, Garrick concedes that even if no one can cheer his horse, he's grateful for his friends-and a friend, as it turns out, is exactly what the horse needs. With an assortment of animals comprising the characters, Moore's bright, child-friendly illustrations and a bouncy rhyme, this is just right to introduce very young visitors to Colonial Williamsburg, although it does not distinguish itself for much broader use. A short glossary explains unfamiliar terms such as "forge," "counterpane," and "magazine." (Picture book. 3-6)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780810994904
  • Publisher: Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/1/2008
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 937,562
  • Age range: 1 - 6 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.00 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author


Susan Lubner is the coauthor of Noises at Night, which was featured on The Today Show, and the author of Ruthie Bon Bair: Do Not Go to Bed with Wringing Wet Hair. This is her third picture book. She lives in Southboro, Massachusetts.

Margie Moore is the beloved illustrator of Bartholomew’s Blessing, Count the Ways, Little Brown Bear, and Colors of Spring. School Library Journal called her illustrations “splendid.” She lives in Wall, New Jersey.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 26, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Great book for teaching children about friendship and history.

    This is a book about a runaway horse, Lancer, who is "blue." All of the characters (in animal form) are trying to find out what is wrong, and to help him. This book takes place in Colonial Williamsburg, and teaches kids not only about the place, but about the jobs and customs of the time, without them realizing it. It also teaches a lesson in friendship and compassion. The illustrations are beautiful and appealing to children. The characters are in animal form and are great for children, especially because Colonial Williamsburg sells companion toys for all of the characters. My sons read the book while playing along with the plush horses. This is a fun book to read aloud, because the lines rhyme in a natural way.

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