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Hot, Hot, Hot
     

Hot, Hot, Hot

by Neal Layton
 
Looking for an escape from the heat? Kids will laugh out loud at the lively illustrations in Neal Layton’s tale of two fun-loving, enterprising mammoths.

For wild and woolly mammoths like Oscar and Arabella, playing in the ice and snow and arctic winds of an Ice Age winter is the coolest fun. But when the snow starts to melt, and thousands of brightly

Overview

Looking for an escape from the heat? Kids will laugh out loud at the lively illustrations in Neal Layton’s tale of two fun-loving, enterprising mammoths.

For wild and woolly mammoths like Oscar and Arabella, playing in the ice and snow and arctic winds of an Ice Age winter is the coolest fun. But when the snow starts to melt, and thousands of brightly colored plants sprout up and irritate their eyes, and insects are swarming, and it just gets hotter and hotter and hotter, it seems there’s no end to their misery. Then one day, the shaggy pair comes up with a bright idea. It may be a close shave, but it looks like they’ve finally found a way to enjoy the hottest summer ever!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Layton's prehistoric pair from Oscar and Arabella returns in Hot Hot Hot, as the long Ice Age winter gives way to a blisteringly unpleasant summer, when insects and rising temperatures plague them. A pair of scissors ultimately saves the overheated duo, as they shear themselves and their other hirsute pals, taking to the beach to play volleyball and lounge in the sun. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Would there really have been hot summers with thousands of bright plants during the last Ice Age? So claims the author and he writes a book based on this premise. Two woolly mammoths, big-eared Oscar with short straight tusks and Arabella with long curled tusks, enjoy the ice, snow, and arctic winds of winter, but they have a hard time coping with the summer because of their allergies and their heavy coats. Insects, dust, and lack of shade accompany the increasing heat one particularly miserable summer. The mammoths try fanning themselves with leaves and jumping into a lake, but their tactics are futile. Oscar's patented scissors, however, save the day. Not only do the two mammoths cut each other's hair but they also give all the other animals haircuts too. The illustrations, using mixed media, including pencils, paint, ink, and markers, are simply but effectively drawn with humor. Showing how the mammoths would have experienced the change of seasons, the colors and pictures of the hot summer make you feel uncomfortable while the cold winters look like fun. When winter returns to the shorn animals, all of them, except one freezing cave man, grow their coats back. A brief "Ice Age Facts" page tells kids what's real and what's made up in the story, but a backup reference for the claim that "seasons in the Ice Age were much like ours" seems called for. 2004 (orig. 2003), Candlewick Press, Ages 3 to 8.
—Carol Raker Collins, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-What happens to two woolly mammoths when summer makes an unwelcome appearance during the Ice Age? That's the premise of Layton's extremely silly picture book. Oscar and Arabella, blissfully ice skating (minus the skates) in the freezing cold, sneeze when the weather is warm enough for flowers, frantically scratch at the invading insects, and sweat in the heat of the sun. After they make several amusing attempts to cool themselves off, Oscar holds up a scissors in his trunk and promptly invents the haircut. The grass is littered with mammoth hair as Arabella examines her new look in Oscar's mirror. The trend spreads like ragweed through the animal world; even the human lurking nearby throughout the story discards his animal skin. (And children are likely to be amused by his naked behind.) The illustrations are rough-hewn and absurd; this combination is unfailingly appealing. Layton uses a variety of media to produce bright, primitive landscapes populated with lively, cartoon creatures. An epilogue entitled "Ice Age Facts" presents some simplified information, including this tidbit: "There probably weren't any combs, mirrors, or scissors in the Ice Age. I made that up. Animals would have had to cut their woolly coats with blunt stone axes. (Just kidding)." This paragraph will elicit chortles from some children and confusion from others. It exemplifies the dry humor that infuses Hot Hot Hot.-Susan Weitz, Spencer-Van Etten Schools, Spencer, NY Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Two woolly mammoths come up with a palliative for summer's heat in this high-energy import. Weary of suffering through the short but intense Ice Age summer, Oscar and Arabella try several ineffective cooling strategies, then at last just give each other major haircuts. Their relief is so palpable that soon all the other furred and hairy creatures are lining up for trims of their own. Layton illustrates with wild, sketchy pen strokes over splashes of somewhat subdued color; the effect ranges from pleasantly messy, to frenetic in more crowded scenes. Happily, when winter comes again, the animals regain their pelts-except for the human figure who's been capering about in the background all this time, naked bum and all. Layton caps this brief, breezy, faintly scandalous episode with the admission that there probably were no scissors, mirrors, or combs in the Ice Ages; he just made that part up. Shocking. (Picture book. 6-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763621483
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
05/28/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.87(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Layton uses pencil, paint, ink, and marker, among other media, to create his illustrations. About HOT HOT HOT, he says, "Oscar and Arabella would have lived in the most recent Ice Age, which ended about 10,000 years ago. There probably weren’t any combs, mirrors, or scissors then. I made that up. Animals would have had to cut their woolly coats with blunt stone axes. (Just kidding)." Neal Layton holds degrees in graphic design and illustration, and lives in England.

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