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Hot Property: Screenwriting in the New Hollywood
     

Hot Property: Screenwriting in the New Hollywood

by Christopher Keane
 
A working screenwriter tells how to cash in on the newest Hollywood trends.

The technology of filmmaking has changed drastically-and so have the rules for making it in Hollywood. Screenwriter Christopher Keane's groundbreaking step-by-step screenwriting workshop clues every writer in on how to shift their focus to meet the wants of a new independent

Overview

A working screenwriter tells how to cash in on the newest Hollywood trends.

The technology of filmmaking has changed drastically-and so have the rules for making it in Hollywood. Screenwriter Christopher Keane's groundbreaking step-by-step screenwriting workshop clues every writer in on how to shift their focus to meet the wants of a new independent Hollywood and still remain true to a personal vision.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Getting published in any genre but screenwriting may seem like a cinch after reading Keane's book, which is meant to steer new writers through the cutthroat world. The author, who has written more than a dozen novels and screenplays (Dangerous Company, etc.), starts off by asking readers questions like why they want to enter this business, and what kinds of movies they like, since those preferences often indicate where their passion and talent lie. Once this foundation is set, the remainder of the first half of the book proceeds to detail techniques such as plot and character, with several examples from real scripts providing guidance. Throughout, Keane relates many personal anecdotes from his own career and includes a chapter about the thrills and horrors of breaking into Hollywood. The book's second half dictates the full script of the screenplay Don't Kiss Me There, which Keane wrote, "to show [readers] what my thought process was in writing the script." Both aspiring screenwriters and beginners should find many helpful tips in this frank but encouraging book (Aug. 5) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Screenwriter Keane (How To Write a Selling Screenplay) offers much sound advice on how to develop the "hot property" of the title-i.e., a screenplay for which filmmakers will be clamoring. The keys are what Keane calls the five "horsemen": situation, concept, story, plot, and structure. Useful features include tips on writing a mini-treatment that will capture the attention of producers and a summarizing chapter explaining how to break into Hollywood, undoubtedly the major aim of this work's intended audience. Keane illustrates many of his points with snippets of screenplays, including his favorites. Although he has played the Hollywood game, he by no means hesitates to criticize the mindset of the studio "suits" and some of the movies they have produced. The final half consists of his (unproduced) screenplay, intriguingly titled Don't Kiss Me There. Recommended for larger cinema and film studies collections, as there isn't much to distinguish this book from the scores of others on screenwriting.-Roy Liebman, California State Univ. Lib., Los Angeles Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780425190401
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/05/2003
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
6.08(w) x 8.96(h) x 0.81(d)

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