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Hotel and Motel Loss Prevention : A Management Perspective / Edition 1

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Overview

This relevant introduction fills a void in the hospitality industry regarding security and loss prevention. The text provides meaningful guidance to hotel and motel management personnel with regard to management's role in security amid the growing concern of loss prevention and security issues. Topics covered include hotel management and loss prevention, physical security, loss prevention and hotel operations, risk management, legal considerations and international operations. For those in the hospitality industry or interested in pursuing the hospitality industry.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130109095
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 8/11/2000
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 257
  • Product dimensions: 7.25 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

HARVEY BURSTEIN, David B. Schulman Professor of Security at Northeastern University's College of Criminal Justice, is a graduate of the Creighton University School of Law, a former special agent of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Chief, Foreign and Domestic Investigations, Surveys, and Physical Security, U.S. Department of State. Since leaving federal service Mr. Burstein has practiced law, been a security management consultant for various Fortune 500 companies, and worked as a corporate security director.

As a consultant he has been retained by the American Hotel & Motel Association, Inter-Continental Hotels, the Chicago Ritz Carlton Hotel, Marcus Hotels, the Saunders Hotels Company, Inc., and Sage Hotels and Lodges; he has also served on the AH&MA's Security, Safety, and Fire Prevention Committee. Mr. Burstein has been the corporate security director for Sheraton Hotels and a visiting faculty member at Cornell University's School of Hotel Administration. In addition, he has addressed meetings of the AH&MA, Quality Inns, Westin Hotels, the Georgia, Iowa, Missouri, and Caribbean Hotel & Motel Associations, the Club Managers of America, and the National Restaurant Association.

Theauthor of nine books on various aspects of security management and investigations, Mr. Burstein also was asked to write the chapter on security for the third edition of G. H. Lattin's Modern Hotel and Motel Management. He currently is a member of the editorial advisory board of Hotel/Motel Security and Safety Management.

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Read an Excerpt

PREFACE

This book is not the first written on the subject of hotel security. However, the others, including some of my own, have tended to focus mainly on the roles of security directors and their staffs rather than on those of hotel management personnel and hotel employees in general. My own experiences in the industry have led me to conclude that this gap needs to be filled if future generations of hotel managers, and the properties by which they are employed, are to enjoy the optimum benefits of effective loss-prevention programs.

A large part of the problem, even at properties priding themselves on their current security practices, stems from those owners and general managers who still do not really understand what security, in the broadest sense of the word, can contribute to a property's profits and reputation. They are inclined to think of security as a limited, narrowly defined function whose sole responsibility is to prevent crime. This misconception may well persist indefinitely, to the lodging industry's detriment, unless students in hotel management programs are exposed to new ideas about what security really is and what it should be doing at any property.

With that thought in mind, I have undertaken to write this text for the uninitiated, hoping that it will serve a useful purpose. This book is designed to help students understand that policing and security are not the same and that there are differences between crime prevention and loss prevention.

One cannot ignore the importance of preventing crime. When crimes occur at any property, the impact may range from filing an insurance claim through litigation to adverse publicity and a decline inoccupancy. Realistically, however, to operate profitably neither can the importance of general loss-prevention measures be minimized. Anything that prevents losses, or at least helps reduce their dollar value, is fundamental to good management. Coincidentally, many measures designed to prevent losses can be instituted with or without formally organized security departments, often at little expense. It is this awareness that I hope to create by exposing hotel management students, for whom this text is intended, to new ideas of which they previously may not have been aware.

In concluding I must thank Albert J. Pucciarelli, Chief Legal Officer, General Counsel and Secretary of Inter-Continental Hotels, and Jeffrey Saunders of Saunders Hotels, for providing me with photographs to help dress up the book, and Roger Saunders, a past president of the American Hotel & Motel Association, for so graciously having agreed to write a foreword. I would be remiss if I failed to thank MJ Linney of El Paso Community College, whose early review was both appreciated and helpful, as well as those at Prentice Hall with whom I have had the pleasure of working, especially Neil Marquardt. Equally important, in any work of this kind there may be occasional errors despite the author's best efforts and those of the editor and production staff. However, let it be understood that all errors of omission or commission are mine and mine alone.

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction: Hotel Management and Loss Prevention.

2. The Role of Physical Security.

3. Loss Prevention and Hotel Operations.

4. Guests and Loss Prevention.

5. Risk Management, Emergencies and Disasters.

6. Legal Considerations in Preventing Losses.

7. The Security Department's Role.

8. International Operations.

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Preface

PREFACE

This book is not the first written on the subject of hotel security. However, the others, including some of my own, have tended to focus mainly on the roles of security directors and their staffs rather than on those of hotel management personnel and hotel employees in general. My own experiences in the industry have led me to conclude that this gap needs to be filled if future generations of hotel managers, and the properties by which they are employed, are to enjoy the optimum benefits of effective loss-prevention programs.

A large part of the problem, even at properties priding themselves on their current security practices, stems from those owners and general managers who still do not really understand what security, in the broadest sense of the word, can contribute to a property's profits and reputation. They are inclined to think of security as a limited, narrowly defined function whose sole responsibility is to prevent crime. This misconception may well persist indefinitely, to the lodging industry's detriment, unless students in hotel management programs are exposed to new ideas about what security really is and what it should be doing at any property.

With that thought in mind, I have undertaken to write this text for the uninitiated, hoping that it will serve a useful purpose. This book is designed to help students understand that policing and security are not the same and that there are differences between crime prevention and loss prevention.

One cannot ignore the importance of preventing crime. When crimes occur at any property, the impact may range from filing an insurance claim through litigation to adverse publicity and a decline in occupancy. Realistically, however, to operate profitably neither can the importance of general loss-prevention measures be minimized. Anything that prevents losses, or at least helps reduce their dollar value, is fundamental to good management. Coincidentally, many measures designed to prevent losses can be instituted with or without formally organized security departments, often at little expense. It is this awareness that I hope to create by exposing hotel management students, for whom this text is intended, to new ideas of which they previously may not have been aware.

In concluding I must thank Albert J. Pucciarelli, Chief Legal Officer, General Counsel and Secretary of Inter-Continental Hotels, and Jeffrey Saunders of Saunders Hotels, for providing me with photographs to help dress up the book, and Roger Saunders, a past president of the American Hotel & Motel Association, for so graciously having agreed to write a foreword. I would be remiss if I failed to thank MJ Linney of El Paso Community College, whose early review was both appreciated and helpful, as well as those at Prentice Hall with whom I have had the pleasure of working, especially Neil Marquardt. Equally important, in any work of this kind there may be occasional errors despite the author's best efforts and those of the editor and production staff. However, let it be understood that all errors of omission or commission are mine and mine alone.

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