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The Hound of the Baskervilles Read-Along (Saddleback Classics Series)

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Audio Includes: 1 paperback and 1 audio CD. Timeless Classics--designed for the struggling reader and adapted to retain the integrity of the original classic. These classic novels will grab a student's attention from the first page. Included are eight pages of end-of-book activities to enhance the reading experience. Audio sets for each titles are paced for students to follow the text word-for-word and include one classic novel and two audio CDs-more help struggling readers. ...
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Overview


Audio Includes: 1 paperback and 1 audio CD. Timeless Classics--designed for the struggling reader and adapted to retain the integrity of the original classic. These classic novels will grab a student's attention from the first page. Included are eight pages of end-of-book activities to enhance the reading experience. Audio sets for each titles are paced for students to follow the text word-for-word and include one classic novel and two audio CDs-more help struggling readers.

When a second member of the Baskerville family dies, Sherlock Holmes investigates and finds murderous greed behind the supposed curse.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Young Martians start elementary school in this reassuring comedy, the debut of the First Graders from Mars series, in which the hero longs for the good old days of "martiangarten." Horus, a froggy-looking child with prehensile tentacles on his chartreuse head, becomes confused in his new classroom. "Where are the snooze mats? Where are the snacks?" he asks. "First graders are too big for those things," scoffs a reptilian girl with lilac hair. Horus's pink-and-green-spotted teacher (who "had eyes in the back of her head. And in the front. And on the sides") purses her lips with concern. Corey (You Forgot Your Skirt, Amelia Bloomer!) believably depicts Horus's embarrassment and his conflict with his mother, who literally drags him to school the next day. While the author doesn't examine Horus's confident classmates, she shows how Horus encourages another scared student to be brave. Teague (How Do Dinosaurs Say Goodnight?) sets the action amid a Seussian landscape of spiky mountains, purple volcanoes and green anemone with eyeballs on their stalks. His bug-eyed, rubbery-limbed aliens perform familiar tasks in comical ways (Horus reads upside-down, balancing on his own face). Like Dan Yaccarino's First Day on a Strange New Planet, this universal drama takes a shrewd but optimistic look at first grade. Ages 5-7. (Aug.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature - Ann Sanger
Originally published in parts as a monthly serial in The Strand Magazine between August 1901 and April 1902, the author described this work as "a real creeper." It is the third of four novels written by Doyle depicting the illustrious character of Sherlock Holmes, and it is easily the most popular. After the mysterious circumstances surrounding his neighbor's death, Dr. James Mortimer travels to London seeking help from the master detective. The appearance of an old manuscript and the legendary curse on the Baskerville family causes Mortimer to fear for the life of the next heir, Sir Henry. Watson, Holmes' assistant, accompanies the doctor and baronet to Devonshire to investigate. Strange events occur and interconnect to warrant the attention of any reader. Sherlock Holmes' use of logic, astute observations, and superior intellect enable him to solve the diabolical ruin of the Baskerville family. This novel is considered to be Conan Doyle's greatest work for its use of descriptive writing in depicting the moors. The dark, foreboding moors are so central to the plot that they could be considered as a character in the story. Both author and illustrator journeyed to the moors in preparation for the book, although decades apart in time. The novel could be described as a detective journal, crime mystery, or horror story. This illustrated edition is further enhanced by the haunting drawings of Pam Smy. This classic of fiction is used frequently in high school curricula. It is a spine-tingling, page-turner that it not easily put down.
Kirkus Reviews
Horus wears jeans, a striped shirt, and a backpack like any other first grader, but he travels to school in a flying cup (flying saucers are "so "last century), because his school is on Mars. The students are different types of Martians: some green, some blue, some polka-dotted-and all funny. Corey, who made an auspicious debut with "You Forgot Your Skirt, Amelia Bloomer! "(2000), offers Episode 1 of the First Graders from Mars series, which describes Horus's reluctance to leave his "martiangarten "days behind to move on to first grade. He slurps his soup with the wrong tentacle, tangles with an overly confident Martian girl named Tera, and lands in the Beta reading group (rather than the Alpha group with nemesis Tera). Corey works some simple Martian-style language and clever puns into her story: the Martian kids sit in thinking capsules instead of desks, and the floating, polka-dotted teacher has eyes in the front and back of her head, and on both sides, too. Additional layers of punny humor enhance the full-color, cartoon-style illustrations by Teague ("The Great Gracie Chase", p. 188, etc.) who finds something clever to add on every page. Horus has the real fears of any entering first grader, and this story will be popular with kindergarten and first-grade teachers and students, who will be waiting for Episode 2. "(Picture book. 5-7)"
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781562543204
  • Publisher: Saddleback Educational Publishing
  • Publication date: 1/28/2011
  • Series: Timeless Classics Series
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Read-Along Edition
  • Sales rank: 1,455,354
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 9.70 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, a Scottish author in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, was a prolific and successful writer. He is well known for his crime fiction, notably the stories of Sherlock Holmes. His other well known publications are The Study in Scarlet, The Valley of Fear, and The Sign of Four. He died in 1930.

Biography

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was born in Edinburgh in 1859. After nine years in Jesuit schools, he went to Edinburgh University, receiving a degree in medicine in 1881. He then became an eye specialist in Southsea, with a distressing lack of success. Hoping to augment his income, he wrote his first story, A Study in Scarlet. His detective, Sherlock Holmes, was modeled in part after Dr. Joseph Bell of the Edinburgh Infirmary, a man with spectacular powers of observation, analysis, and inference. Conan Doyle may have been influenced also by his admiration for the neat plots of Gaboriau and for Poe's detective, M. Dupin. After several rejections, the story was sold to a British publisher for £25, and thus was born the world's best-known and most-loved fictional detective. Fifty-nine more Sherlock Holmes adventures followed.

Once, wearying of Holmes, his creator killed him off, but was forced by popular demand to resurrect him. Sir Arthur -- he had been knighted for this defense of the British cause in his The Great Boer War -- became an ardent Spiritualist after the death of his son Kingsley, who had been wounded at the Somme in World War I. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died in Sussex in 1930.

Author biography courtesy of Penguin Group (USA).

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    1. Also Known As:
      Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 22, 1859
    2. Place of Birth:
      Edinburgh, Scotland
    1. Date of Death:
      July 7, 1930
    2. Place of Death:
      Crowborough, Sussex, England

Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER I
Mr. Sherlock Holmes

Mr. Sherlock Holmes, who was usually very late in the mornings, save upon those not infrequent occasions when he stayed up all night, was seated at the breakfast table. I stood upon the hearth-rug and picked up the stick which our visitor had left behind him the night before. It was a fine, thick piece of wood, bulbous-headed, of the sort which is known as a “Penang lawyer.” Just under the head was a broad silver band, nearly an inch across. “To James Mortimer, M.R.C.S., from his friends of the C.C.H.,” was engraved upon it, with the date “1884.” It was just such a stick as the old-fashioned family practitioner used to carry—dignified, solid, and reassuring. “Well, Watson, what do you make of it?” Holmes was sitting with his back to me, and I had given him no sign of my occupation. “How did you know what I was doing? I believe you have eyes in the back of your head.” “I have, at least, a well-polished, silver-plated coffee-pot in front of me,” said he. “But, tell me, Watson, what do you make of our visitor’s stick? Since we have been so unfortunate as to miss him and have no notion of his errand, this accidental souvenir becomes of importance. Let me hear you reconstruct the man by an examination of it.” “I think,” said I, following so far as I could the methods of my companion, “that Dr. Mortimer is a successful elderly medical man, well-esteemed, since those who know him give him this mark of their appreciation.” “Good!” said Holmes. “Excellent!” “I think also that the probabilityis in favour of his being a country practitioner who does a great deal of his visiting on foot.” “Why so?” “Because this stick, though originally a very handsome one, has been so knocked about that I can hardly imagine a town practitioner carrying it. The thick iron ferrule is worn down, so it is evident that he has done a great amount of walking with it.” “Perfectly sound!” said Holmes. “And then again, there is the ‘friends of the C.C.H.’ I should guess that to be the Something Hunt, the local hunt to whose members he has possibly given some surgical assistance, and which has made him a small presentation in return.” “Really, Watson, you excel yourself,” said Holmes, pushing back his chair and lighting a cigarette. “I am bound to say that in all the accounts which you have been so good as to give of my own small achievements you have habitually underrated your own abilities. It may be that you are not yourself luminous, but you are a conductor of light. Some people without possessing genius have a remarkable power of stimulating it. I confess, my dear fellow, that I am very much in your debt.” He had never said as much before, and I must admit that his words gave me keen pleasure, for I had often been piqued by his indifference to my admiration and to the attempts which I had made to give publicity to his methods. I was proud, too, to think that I had so far mastered his system as to apply it in a way which earned his approval. He now took the stick from my hands and examined it for a few minutes with his naked eyes. Then, with an expression of interest, he laid down his cigarette, and, carrying the cane to the window, he looked over it again with a convex lens. “Interesting, though elementary,” said he, as he returned to his favourite corner of the settee. “There are certainly one or two indications upon the stick. It gives us the basis for several deductions.” “Has anything escaped me?” I asked, with some self-importance. “I trust that there is nothing of consequence which I have overlooked?” “I am afraid, my dear Watson, that most of your conclusions were erroneous. When I said that you stimulated me I meant, to be frank, that in noting your fallacies I was occasionally guided towards the truth. Not that you are entirely wrong in this instance. The man is certainly a country practitioner. And he walks a good deal.” “Then I was right.” “To that extent.” “But that was all.” “No, no, my dear Watson, not all—by no means all. I would suggest, for example, that a presentation to a doctor is more likely to come from an hospital than from a hunt, and that when the initials ‘C.C.’ are placed before that hospital the words ‘Charing Cross’ very naturally suggest themselves.” “You may be right.” “The probability lies in that direction. And if we take this as a working hypothesis we have a fresh basis from which to start our construction of this unknown visitor.” “Well, then, supposing that ‘C.C.H.’ does stand for ‘Charing Cross Hospital,’ what further inferences may we draw?” “Do none suggest themselves? You know my methods. Apply them!” “I can only think of the obvious conclusion that the man has practised in town before going to the country.” “I think that we might venture a little farther than this. Look at it in this light. On what occasion would it be most probable that such a presentation would be made? When would his friends unite to give him a pledge of their good will? Obviously at the moment when Dr. Mortimer withdrew from the service of the hospital in order to start in practice for himself. We know there has been a presentation. We believe there has been a change from a town hospital to a country practice. Is it, then, stretching our inference too far to say that the presentation was on the occasion of the change?” “It certainly seems probable.” “Now, you will observe that he could not have been on the staff of the hospital, since only a man well-established in a London practice could hold such a position, and such a one would not drift into the country. What was he, then? If he was in the hospital and yet not on the staff, he could only have been a house-surgeon or a house-physician—little more than a senior student. And he left five years ago—the date is on the stick. So your grave, middle-aged family practitioner vanishes into thin air, my dear Watson, and there emerges a young fellow under thirty, amiable, unambitious, absent-minded, and the possessor of a favourite dog, which I should describe roughly as being larger than a terrier and smaller than a mastiff.” I laughed incredulously as Sherlock Holmes leaned back in his settee and blew little wavering rings of smoke up to the ceiling. “As to the latter part, I have no means of checking you,” said I, “but at least it is not difficult to find out a few particulars about the man’s age and professional career.” From my small medical shelf I took down the Medical Directory and turned up the name. There were several Mortimers, but only one who could be our visitor. I read his record aloud. “Mortimer, James, M.R.C.S., 1882, Grimpen, Dartmoor,Devon. House surgeon, from 1882 to 1884, at Charing Cross Hospital. Winner of the Jackson Prize for Comparative Pathology, with essay entitled ‘Is Disease a Reversion?’ Corresponding member of the Swedish Pathological Society. Author of ‘Some Freaks of Atavism’ (Lancet, 1882). ‘Do We Progress? (Journal of Psychology, March, 1883). Medical Officer for the parishes of Grimpen, Thorsley, and High Barrow.” “No mention of that local hunt, Watson,” said Holmes, with a mischievous smile, “but a country doctor, as you very astutely observed. I think that I am fairly justified in my inferences. As to the adjectives, I said, if I remember right, amiable, unambitious, and absent-minded. It is my experience that it is only an amiable man in this world who receives testimonials, only an unambitious one who abandons a London career for the country, and only an absent-minded one who leaves his stick and not his visiting-card after waiting an hour in your room.” “And the dog?” “Has been in the habit of carrying this stick behind his master. Being a heavy stick the dog has held it tightly by the middle, and the marks of his teeth are very plainly visible. The dog’s jaw, as shown in the space between these marks, is too broad in my opinion for a terrier and not broad enough for a mastiff. It may have been—yes, by Jove, it is a curly-haired spaniel.” He had risen and paced the room as he spoke. Now he halted in the recess of the window. There was such a ring of conviction in his voice that I glanced up in surprise. “My dear fellow, how can you possibly be so sure of that?”


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Table of Contents

Foreword ix
1 Mr. Sherlock Holmes 1
2 The Curse of the Baskervilles 11
3 The Problem 27
4 Sir Henry Baskerville 41
5 Three Broken Threads 59
6 Baskerville Hall 74
7 The Stapletons of Merripit House 88
8 First Report of Dr. Watson 108
9 Second Report of Dr. Watson 119
10 Extract from the Diary of Dr. Watson 145
11 The Man on the Tor 160
12 Death on the Moor 179
13 Fixing the Nets 197
14 The Hound of the Baskervilles 214
15 A Retrospection 231
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