Hours [Remastered] by David Bowie | 4582192934616 | CD | Barnes & Noble
Hours

Hours

by David Bowie
     
 

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Since David Bowie spent the '90s jumping from style to style, it comes as a shock that Hours, his final album of the decade, is a relatively straightforward affair. Not only that, but it feels unlike anything else in his catalog. Bowie's music has always been a product of artifice, intelligence, and synthesis. Hours... is a relaxed, natural departure

Overview

Since David Bowie spent the '90s jumping from style to style, it comes as a shock that Hours, his final album of the decade, is a relatively straightforward affair. Not only that, but it feels unlike anything else in his catalog. Bowie's music has always been a product of artifice, intelligence, and synthesis. Hours... is a relaxed, natural departure from this method. Arriving after two labored albums, the shift in tone is quite refreshing. "Thursday's Child," the album's engaging mid-tempo opener, is a good indication of what lays ahead. It feels like classic Bowie, yet recalls no specific era of his career. For the first time, Bowie has absorbed all the disparate strands of his music, from Hunky Dory through Earthling. That doesn't mean Hours... is on par with his earlier masterworks; it never attempts to be that bold. What it does mean is that it's the first album where he has accepted his past and is willing to use it as a foundation for new music. That's the reason why Hours... feels open, even organic -- he's no longer self-conscious, either about living up to his past or creating a new future. It's a welcome change, and it produces some fine music, particularly on the first half of the record, which is filled with such subdued, subtly winning songs as "Something in the Air," "Survive," and "Seven." Toward the end of the album, Bowie branches into harder material, which isn't quite as successful as the first half of the album, yet shares a similar sensibility. And that's what's appealing about Hours... -- it may not be one of Bowie's classics, but it's the work of a masterful musician who has begun to enjoy his craft again and isn't afraid to let things develop naturally.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/28/2007
Label:
Sony Japan
UPC:
4582192934616
catalogNumber:
1344

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

David Bowie   Primary Artist,Acoustic Guitar,Keyboards,Vocals,Guitar (12 String Acoustic)
Everett Bradley   Percussion
Sterling Campbell   Drums
Reeves Gabrels   Synthesizer,Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar,Rhythm Guitar,Multi Instruments,Drum Loop,Guitar (12 String Acoustic),Lead
Chris Haskett   Rhythm Guitar
Mike Levesque   Drums
Mark Plati   Synthesizer,Acoustic Guitar,Bass,Bass Guitar,12-string Guitar,Mellotron,Guitar (12 String Electric)
Holly Palmer   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

David Bowie   Producer,drum programming
Reeves Gabrels   Producer,drum programming
Mark Plati   Producer,Engineer,drum programming
Rex Ray   Artwork,Image Manipulation
Kevin Paul   Engineer
Tim Bret Day   Cover Photo

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