The House at Riverton

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Overview

Grace Bradley went to work at Riverton House as a servant when she was just a girl, before the First World War. For years her life was inextricably tied up with the Hartford family, most particularly the two daughters, Hannah and Emmeline.

In the summer of 1924, at a glittering society party held at the house, a young poet shot himself. The only witnesses were Hannah and Emmeline and only they-and Grace-know the truth.

In 1999, when Grace is ...

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The House at Riverton: A Novel

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Overview

Grace Bradley went to work at Riverton House as a servant when she was just a girl, before the First World War. For years her life was inextricably tied up with the Hartford family, most particularly the two daughters, Hannah and Emmeline.

In the summer of 1924, at a glittering society party held at the house, a young poet shot himself. The only witnesses were Hannah and Emmeline and only they-and Grace-know the truth.

In 1999, when Grace is ninety-eight years old and living out her last days in a nursing home, she is visited by a young director who is making a film about the events of that summer. She takes Grace back to Riverton House and reawakens her memories. Told in flashback, this is the story of Grace's youth during the last days of Edwardian aristocratic privilege shattered by war, of the vibrant twenties, and the changes she witnessed as an entire way of life vanished forever.

The novel is full of secrets-some revealed, others hidden forever, reminiscent of the romantic suspense of Daphne Du Maurier. It is also a meditation on memory, the devastation of war, and a beautifully rendered window into a fascinating time in history.

Originally published to critical acclaim in Australia, already sold in ten countries and a #1 bestseller in England, The House at Riverton is a vivid, page-turning novel of suspense and passion, with characters-and an ending-the reader won't soon forget.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

This debut page-turner from Australian Morton recounts the crumbling of a prominent British family as seen through the eyes of one of its servants. At 14, Grace Reeves leaves home to work for her mother's former employers at Riverton House. She is the same age as Hannah, the headstrong middle child who visits her uncle, Lord Ashbury, at Riverton House with her siblings Emmeline and David. Fascinated, Grace observes their comings and goings and, as an invisible maid, is privy to the secrets she will spend "a lifetime pretending to forget." But when a filmmaker working on a movie about the family contacts a 98-year-old Grace to fact-check particulars, the memories come swirling back. The plot largely revolves around sisters Hannah and Emmeline, who were present when a family friend, the young poet R.S. Hunter, allegedly committed suicide at Riverton. Grace hints throughout the narrative that no one knows the real story, and as she chronicles Hannah's schemes to have her own life and the curdling of younger Emmeline's jealousy, the truth about the poet's death is revealed. Morton triumphs with a riveting plot, a touching but tense love story and a haunting ending. (Apr.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

For decades, Grace Reeves has kept secret the truth of a poet's violent death by the lake at Riverton House in Oxfordshire. Now at the end of her life, 98-year-old Grace's memory is swept back, after interviews for a film about the tragic incident, to those years of her service for the Hartford family. At 15, Grace begins her adult life as a housemaid in the grand Riverton House, quickly learning her place in the servant hierarchy. Her loyalty and attachment to Hannah and Emmeline Hartford grow over the years, as the Hartford family is affected by war, death, financial failings, and illicit love. Debut Australian author Morton pens a suspenseful and beautifully atmospheric novel capturing the transitional time from the end of the Edwardian era through World War I into the Roaring Twenties. Intriguing characters, both past and present, are skillfully drawn to create an enjoyable tale. Recommended for popular fiction collections.-Joy St. John, Henderson Dist. P.L., NV

Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In Australian author Morton's atmospheric first novel, a 98-year-old woman recollects her unwitting role in a fatal deception. Grace, a prominent former archeologist, is living out her waning years in a British nursing home, when an American filmmaker, Ursula, asks her to consult on a movie about the scandalous 1924 suicide of a poet during a lavish soiree at Riverton, a country estate where Grace once served as parlor maid to the Hartford family. Extended flashbacks excavate the mysteries that surround Grace almost from the first. Why did Grace's mother, herself a servant at Riverton before leaving under a cloud, send her 14-year-old daughter to work there? Who is Grace's father? The domestic servant is a convenient expository device: Grace can eavesdrop on every Hartford family crisis. Hannah, her sister Emmeline and brother David occasionally visit Riverton, owned by their uncle, Lord Ashbury. Their father, Frederick, the second son, is an automobile pioneer. But World War I upends the destinies of the Hartford clan. David, his schoolmate Robbie and Grace's heartthrob, Alfred, a footman, all go to fight. David is killed, Robbie drops out of sight and Alfred suffers shell shock. The war also claims the lives of Lord Ashbury and his eldest son, and Frederick inherits the title. Frederick's business is mortgaged to American bankers, the Luxtons, who force a sale of his factory. To Frederick's chagrin, Hannah marries Luxton scion Teddy, who, after flirting briefly with bohemian ways, reverts to stodgy banker-hood. Languishing in London while her estranged father lets Riverton decay, Hannah relies increasingly on Grace, now her personal maid. Hannah's mistaken assumption that Grace knowsshorthand leads both to make a tragic error in judgment. Meanwhile, Robbie resurfaces, his psyche scarred by war. Although ostensibly courting Emmeline, Robbie is drawn into an adulterous affair with Hannah that proves his undoing. Though the climactic revelation feels contrived, Morton's characters and their predicaments are affecting, and she recreates the period with a sure hand.
From the Publisher
"This novel will challenge your definitions of friendship, family and, most of all, trust." — Hallmark Magazine

"An extraordinary debut...written with a lovely turn of phrase. [Morton] knows how to eke out tantalizing secrets and drama." — The Sunday Telegraph (UK)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416550518
  • Publisher: Atria Books
  • Publication date: 4/22/2008
  • Pages: 480
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Kate Morton
Kate Morton, a native Australian, holds degrees in dramatic art and English literature and is currently a doctoral candidate at the University of Queensland. She lives with her family in Brisbane, Australia, and is writing her second novel.
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Read an Excerpt

Part One
GHOSTS STIR

Last November I had a nightmare.

It was 1924 and I was at Riverton again. All the doors hung wide open, silk billowing in the summer breeze. An orchestra perched high on the hill beneath the ancient maple, violins lilting lazily in the warmth. The air rang with pealing laughter and crystal, and the sky was the kind of blue we'd all thought the war had destroyed forever. One of the footmen, smart in black and white, poured champagne into the top of a tower of glass flutes and everyone clapped, delighting in the splendid wastage.

I saw myself, the way one does in dreams, moving amongst the guests. Moving slowly, much more slowly than one can in life, the others a blur of silk and sequins.

I was looking for someone.

Then the picture changed and I was near the summer house, only it wasn't the summer house at Riverton-it couldn't have been. This was not the shiny new building Teddy had designed, but an old structure with ivy climbing the walls, twisting itself through the windows, strangling the pillars.

Someone was calling me. A woman, a voice I recognized, coming from behind the building, on the lake's edge. I walked down the slope, my hands brushing against the tallest reeds. A figure crouched on the bank.

It was Hannah, in her wedding dress, mud splattered across the front, clinging to the appliquéd roses. She looked up at me, her face pale where it emerged from shadow. Her voice chilled my blood. "You're too late." She pointed at my hands, "You're too late."

I looked down at my hands, young hands, covered in dark river mud, and in them the stiff, cold body of a dead foxhound.

*

I know what brought it on, of course. It was the letterfrom the film-maker. I don't receive much mail these days: the occasional postcard from a dutiful, holidaying friend; a perfunctory letter from the bank where I keep a savings account; an invitation to the christening of a child whose parents I am shocked to realize are no longer children themselves.

Ursula's letter had arrived on a Tuesday morning late in November and Sylvia had brought it with her when she came to make my bed. She'd raised heavily sketched eyebrows and waved the envelope.

"Mail today. Something from the States by the look of the stamp. Your grandson, perhaps?" The left brow arched-a question mark-and her voice lowered to a husky whisper. "Terrible business, that. Just terrible. And him such a nice young man."

As Sylvia tut-tutted, I thanked her for the letter. I like Sylvia. She's one of the few people able to look beyond the lines on my face to see the twenty-year-old who lives inside. Nonetheless, I refuse to be drawn into conversation about Marcus.

I asked her to open the curtains and she pursed her lips a moment before moving on to another of her favourite subjects: the weather, the likelihood of snow for Christmas, the havoc it would wreak on the arthritic residents. I responded when required, but my mind was on the envelope in my lap, wondering at the scratchy penmanship, the foreign stamps, softened edges that spoke of lengthy travails.

"Here, why don't I read that for you," Sylvia said, giving the pillows a final, hopeful plump, "give your eyes a bit of a rest?"

"No. Thank you. Perhaps you could pass my glasses, though?"

When she'd left, promising to come back and help me dress after she'd finished her rounds, I prised the letter from its envelope, hands shaking the way they do, wondering whether he was finally coming home.

But it wasn't from Marcus at all. It was from a young woman making a film about the past. She wanted me to look at her sets, to remember things and places from long ago. As if I hadn't spent a lifetime pretending to forget.

I ignored that letter. I folded it carefully and quietly, slid it inside a book I'd long ago given up reading. And then I exhaled. It was not the first time I had been reminded of what happened at Riverton, to Robbie and the Hartford sisters. Once I saw the tail end of a documentary on television, something Ruth was watching about war poets. When Robbie's face filled the screen, his name printed across the bottom in an unassuming font, my skin prickled. But nothing happened. Ruth didn't flinch, the narrator continued, and I went on drying the dinner plates.

Another time, reading the newspaper, my eye was drawn to a familiar name in a write-up in the television guide; a programme celebrating seventy years of British films. I noted the time, my heart thrilling, wondering if I dared watch it. In the end I fell asleep before it finished. There was very little about Emmeline. A few publicity photos, none of which showed her true beauty, and a clip from one of her silent films, The Venus Affair, which made her look strange: hollow-cheeked; jerky movements like a marionette. There was no reference to the other films, the ones that threatened such a fuss. I suppose they don't rate a mention in these days of promiscuity and permissiveness.

But although I had been met with such memories before, Ursula's letter was different. It was the first time in over seventy years that anyone had associated me with the events, had remembered that a young woman named Grace Reeves had been at Riverton that summer. It made me feel vulnerable somehow, singled out. Guilty.

No. I was adamant. That letter would remain unanswered.

And so it did.

A strange thing began to happen, though. Memories, long consigned to the dark reaches of my mind, began to sneak through cracks. Images were tossed up high and dry, picture-perfect, as if a lifetime hadn't passed between. And, after the first tentative drops, the deluge. Whole conversations, word for word, nuance for nuance; scenes played out as though on film.

I have surprised myself. While moths have torn holes in my recent memories, I find the distant past is sharp and clear. They come often lately, those ghosts from the past, and I am surprised to find I don't much mind them. Not nearly so much as I had supposed I would. Indeed, the spectres I have spent my life escaping have become almost a comfort, something I welcome, anticipate, like one of those serials Sylvia is always talking about, hurrying her rounds so that she can watch them down at the main hall. I had forgotten, I suppose, that there were bright memories in amongst the dark.

When the second letter arrived last week, in the same scratchy hand on the same soft paper, I knew I was going to say yes, I would look at the sets. I was curious, a sensation I hadn't felt in some time. There is not much left to be curious about when one is ninety-eight years old, but I wanted to meet this Ursula Ryan who plans to bring them all to life again, who is so passionate about their story.

So I wrote her a letter, had Sylvia post it for me and we arranged to meet.

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Table of Contents

PART ONE

Ghosts Stir The Drawing Room The Nursery Waiting for the Recital All Good Things Saffron High Street In the West Until We Meet Again

PART TWO

The Twelfth of July The Fall of Icarus The Photograph Bankers The Dinner A Suitable Husband The Ball and After

PART THREE

Catching Butterflies Down the Rabbit Hole In the Depths Resurrection The Choice

PART FOUR

Hannah's Story The Beginning of the End Riverton Revisited Slipping Out of Time The End The Tape The Letter

Acknowledgments Author's Note

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Introduction

1. Do you think of The House at Riverton as a tragic novel? How are the characters' tragic outcomes caused by the incompatibility of what they want and who they are?

2. How important to the novel's outcome is Grace's longing for a sister? When Grace finds out about her true parentage, why does she choose not to tell Hannah? Is it the right decision? Would things have ended differently had she done otherwise?

3. Kate Morton has said that the novel's setting is as important to her as its characters, that Riverton Manor is as much a character of the book as its inhabitants. Do you agree? Does Riverton mirror the fates of the Hartford family and the aristocracy in general? If so, in what ways?

4. The First World War was a catalyst for enormous social and cultural change. Not a character in The House at Riverton is left untouched by this. Whose life is most altered? Why?

5. Is there a heroine in The House at Riverton? If so, who is it and why?

6. Grace and Robbie are both illegitimate children of upper-class parents; however, their lives and opportunities are vastly different. Why?

7. Duty is very important to the youthful Grace. Did Grace's sense of duty contribute to the novel's conclusion? If so, how? Would things have turned out better for the characters if Grace had made different decisions?

8. One of the main themes of The House at Riverton is the haunting of the present by the past. In what ways does the novel suggest that the past can never be escaped? Do you agree that our pasts are inescapable?

9. Grace has resisted ever telling anyone about the events at Riverton. Why? What makes her change her mind? Is Grace a reliable narrator?Given her motive for recording her memories, can we trust her?

10. The twentieth century was a period of great and accelerated social change. In particular, the historical years that make up the bulk of Grace's memories comprised a time of enormous transition. In what ways does Grace's life exemplify these social changes?

11. Despite their differences, how might Grace and Hannah be seen as "doubles"? How does Grace's relationship with Alfred mirror Hannah's relationship with Robbie?

12. Another theme in The House at Riverton is that of inheritance — the way we are bound to our families through various items that are passed between the generations. Along with material inheritances, we are also subject to physical, social and psychological legacies. These inheritances are important in making us who we are, and are not easily escaped. In what way is this notion explored in The House at Riverton? How do these various types of inheritance influence the lives of Hannah, Frederick, Teddy, Robbie, Grace, Jemima and Simion?

Kate Morton, a native Australian, holds degrees in dramatic art and English literature and is currently a doctoral candidate at the University of Queensland. She lives with her family in Brisbane, Australia, and is writing her third novel.

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Reading Group Guide

1. Do you think of The House at Riverton as a tragic novel? How are the characters' tragic outcomes caused by the incompatibility of what they want and who they are?

2. How important to the novel's outcome is Grace's longing for a sister? When Grace finds out about her true parentage, why does she choose not to tell Hannah? Is it the right decision? Would things have ended differently had she done otherwise?

3. Kate Morton has said that the novel's setting is as important to her as its characters, that Riverton Manor is as much a character of the book as its inhabitants. Do you agree? Does Riverton mirror the fates of the Hartford family and the aristocracy in general? If so, in what ways?

4. The First World War was a catalyst for enormous social and cultural change. Not a character in The House at Riverton is left untouched by this. Whose life is most altered? Why?

5. Is there a heroine in The House at Riverton? If so, who is it and why?

6. Grace and Robbie are both illegitimate children of upper-class parents; however, their lives and opportunities are vastly different. Why?

7. Duty is very important to the youthful Grace. Did Grace's sense of duty contribute to the novel's conclusion? If so, how? Would things have turned out better for the characters if Grace had made different decisions?

8. One of the main themes of The House at Riverton is the haunting of the present by the past. In what ways does the novel suggest that the past can never be escaped? Do you agree that our pasts are inescapable?

9. Grace has resisted ever telling anyone about the events at Riverton. Why? What makes her change her mind? Is Grace a reliable narrator? Given her motive for recording her memories, can we trust her?

10. The twentieth century was a period of great and accelerated social change. In particular, the historical years that make up the bulk of Grace's memories comprised a time of enormous transition. In what ways does Grace's life exemplify these social changes?

11. Despite their differences, how might Grace and Hannah be seen as "doubles"? How does Grace's relationship with Alfred mirror Hannah's relationship with Robbie?

12. Another theme in The House at Riverton is that of inheritance — the way we are bound to our families through various items that are passed between the generations. Along with material inheritances, we are also subject to physical, social and psychological legacies. These inheritances are important in making us who we are, and are not easily escaped. In what way is this notion explored in The House at Riverton? How do these various types of inheritance influence the lives of Hannah, Frederick, Teddy, Robbie, Grace, Jemima and Simion?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 873 )
Rating Distribution

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(375)

4 Star

(325)

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(120)

2 Star

(28)

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(25)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 873 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Mesmerizing & emotional

    For me, this was on of the best novels I have read in some time. In order to truly like this book, you must enjoy a good story. Good stories aren't always filled with suspense and drama. The ending is a wonderful one but sometimes to enjoy the end you must know the beginning. The majority of the book is allowing you to get to know the characters, their relationships, and this is what makes the ending so emotional & satisfying. This is a spectacular debut from a new author who is able to allow us to see the past through the memories of an older woman. We see life through the eyes of a service girl dedicated to the lady she works for. A girl who kept a secret her entire life and finally shares it with the reader. It's been a long time since I felt such emotion after finishing a book.

    32 out of 37 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 24, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Exciting and Fascinating!

    THE HOUSE AT RIVERTON is a historical novel and revolves around a suicide. In 1924 a young poet apparently killed himself on the Riverton property. Ninety eight year old Grace tells the story and alternates between past and present. There's a lot of secrecy and suspense and keeps the reader guessing until the very end. A movie producer becomes fascinated with the story of the troubled poet. In her research she learns that a Riverton maid is still alive in a nursing home, (Grace). A mystery and a love story, plenty of twists and turns, readers unravel the mystery. Exciting!

    28 out of 29 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 9, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    There are only few books with a great storyline. This was one of

    There are only few books with a great storyline. This was one of them. A great summer read.

    24 out of 27 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 12, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    If you love historical fiction....

    I love historical novels and this one did not disappoint. I love how that book is narrarated. The characters are interesting and suprise you right up until the end. I love how the characters are connected. I only wish Grace could have told us a bit more about the later years of her life (not that they mattered). Overall a great read.

    16 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 28, 2009

    Great Read

    This is my first book by Kate Morton. I must say, I do love this period and this type of book. It was a little slow to get going but well worth it. Once this story got moving, I could not put it down. I love mysteries as well and thought I had this one figured out as there is a "who done it" theme to this book. Well, I did to a point have it figured out, but there was a twist at the end the surprised me. Actually, there were a few twists at the end that were welcome surprises. I can't wait to read The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton. Since I don't like when people review a book and give away the entire plot, all I will say is I highly recommend this book. Enjoyed the writing style as well.

    14 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2010

    Really disappointed

    The House at Riverton was the first book I'd read by this author. This was not the book for me. I found it very boring and slow, and depressing. It was like reading a soap opera. Lots of characters, to the point that it was a little confusing for me. Some of them seemed unnecessary. As much as there was going on in this book, nothing really happened. And I was looking forward to reading The Forgotten Garden, but after this experience with this book and author....maybe not.

    12 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 12, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Kate Morton-My New Favorite Author

    I started with Forgotten Garden which was her second book, and loved it, so I ordered House At Riverton and am 3/4 of the way through, and love it, too. They are both tales of the rich and privleged of the past, but also very much of the have-nots, also. They both have deep mysteriss, and do not telegraph where they are going. They mix a little of the present in too so you have that contrast, like what was done in the movie"Titanic". Her stories are rich in atmosphere and descrption of another time. It takes a few pages to get into the tale, but is very rewarding. I will buy anything from Kate Morton from now on.

    10 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 6, 2010

    Interesting and Intriguing...

    I enjoyed the plot, the characters and the drama catpured in this book. It makes me want to be that interesting as an old woman minus the regrets and reiterates that we all have secrets.

    Another enjoyable book of Kate Morton is The Secret Garden... which I read first and found to be better than The House at Riverton.

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 20, 2009

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    Perseverance is required, but worth it in the end...

    I must admit I nearly gave up reading this novel after about the first 100 pages. It just seemed to long-winded. I think it definitely could have been shorter, too many words and too many characters, some were just not needed!! Having said that though, if you persevere it does get better. It took me a long time to read, I found I could only read it one chunk at a time, but I thought the ending was perfect, maybe the best ending to a book I have read in a long time. Kate Morton is undoubtedly a very talented writer and a lot of effort has gone into writing this book. It's worth reading just to get to the 'secret' at the end. If you like romantic fiction, with a bit of history thrown in then this one is for you

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2012

    The House at Riverton is amazing. The plot is exceptional and we

    The House at Riverton is amazing. The plot is exceptional and well thought out. Somewhat predictable at some parts, but in a good way because the story flowed. The characters were well written and didn't change (unless you count growing up). I couldn't stop reading because I really wanted to know what happened. I fell in love with a few characters, even one that didn't last long in the book. Another great thing about this book was the setting. I'm absolutely in love with England, especially in the past.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 20, 2009

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    Intellectally stimulating!

    Just up my alley, although I'm usually not that into historical novels, I loved this. Done in retrospect is fascinating and secrets revealed cleverly kept me intrigued. Another book I'd like to recommend that I'm absolutely in love with is EXPLOSION IN PARIS, by LINDA MASEMORE PIRRUNG! It has all the profound insights into the human condition with, conlicts, tragedies, endurance, but also pure joy, and fullfillment that can't be measured! Check out the reviews! They hooked ME big time!

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2012

    beautifully written

    the story unfolds beautifully with the reader having knowledge of some tragedy at the end. What I loved about the book is that you really didnt know how that tragedy would come to be.
    lovely descriptive words, interesting characters and easy to follow jumps from past to present.
    Loved it!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 13, 2009

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    Great first book and great technique.

    Really enjoyed this book for it's character development and blending of old with the new. Gives a wonderful portrayal of an era of change and the class system of servitude in Victorian times and how the war changed that. Not a fast moving novel but the writers descriptive forces are amazing. I liked this author so much I bought the new one The Forgotten Garden, it's even better.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2012

    Had such promise but not met in the end

    This was a book to forget. The setting, time frame and characters all seemed interesting. I stayed up late a number of nights reading and hoping it would be a satisfying ending. In the end I simply didn't feel moved by the spoiled rich people and their servants.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2010

    OK

    I have rather contradictory feelings about this book. Well written, but very slow paced. While I found the premise of the story and the characters interesting, slow development of the story often allowed my attention to wander. I'd catch myself having read a page without really reading it. Had this not been the selection my book club was reading, I probably would not have finished it. That would have been a shame because the last part of the book was very good. In all fairness, there were members of my book club who thoroughly enjoyed THE HOUSE AT RIVERTON.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2010

    Wonderful!

    The storyline goes back and forth from the present and past, which I found intriguing. I couldn't wait to find out what she was dictating to her grandson, unravelling the secrets of the Hartford family, and also the twist relating to her life! I loved the characters, and felt sad when I finished the book. I can't wait to read her new novel, The Forgotten Garden!

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2010

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    Wow.

    This book was... intense. I enjoy Morton's writing style very much, and this book was excellent. The ending left me amazed, and a little sad. I do believe her other novel The Forgotten Garden is better, this story was great. I loved Grace, and her strength, Hannah and her secrets, and Robbie and his love. I recomend this book to anyone!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 4, 2010

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    Loved this book!

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. It has a good story and well drawn characters. What I enjoyed most, however, was the fascinating peek into the lives of servants in an early 20th century English mansion, especially the way they viewed their employers and their jobs. It was such a different way of life than today, and their attitudes were so different than what we would have today were we in their positions. I highly recommend this book!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2009

    good read, good detail...looking forward to reading other book(s) by this author

    this was a good read, with enough text dedicated to surroundings and fashion to help put reader in the time period, and an engaging character that is followed from the the early 1900's to "old age" presant.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2009

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    Disappointing

    I'd seen so many positive reviews of this novel that I was eager to read it. Unfortunately, the story is so heavily padded with non-essential plot that the entire telling becomes awkward and the tale just lumbers along. By the time I got to the story's climax, I simply didn't care any more. Certainly it's light and easy summer reading, and Morton pulls out some attractive turns of phrase, but overall, I was just bored.

    For truly worthy, well-plotted Gothics, try DuMaurier's Rebecca or Byatt's Possession.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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