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House Beautiful Great Style
     

House Beautiful Great Style

by Christine Pittel (Editor), Susi Oberhelman (Designed by), Louis Oliver Gropp (Editor)
 
While some maintain a good design sense comes from intuition, others argue that expressing style is merely a matter of training the eye. With this 100th anniversary tribute, the editors of House Beautiful magazine offer you the ultimate opportunity to achieve "Great Style."

More than 300 vibrant color photos accompanied by equally inspiring text salute

Overview

While some maintain a good design sense comes from intuition, others argue that expressing style is merely a matter of training the eye. With this 100th anniversary tribute, the editors of House Beautiful magazine offer you the ultimate opportunity to achieve "Great Style."

More than 300 vibrant color photos accompanied by equally inspiring text salute the celebrated tastemakers of the last one hundred years. From legendary American decorator Billy Baldwin, the old-school Southern Gentleman famous for his dark walls, to the phenomenal "Sister" Parish who could make a just-bought penthouse look like old-money in her inimitable yet comfortable style, and culminating with contemporary stars such as Mark Hampton, Victoria Hagan, Bunny Williams and John Saladino, who talk freely about where they find their creative inspiration and how they bring their efforts to fruition.

The pages of Great Style are dotted with interesting anecdotes, such as the fact that Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis' Fifth Avenue apartment was published for the first and only time in House Beautiful, when she offered it as a backdrop to promote a favorite charity.

The interiors featured in Great Style convey the recurring themes in today's home design: paring down for a cleaner look; creating balance and harmony in a room; and defying convention to express personal style. Also, the distinctive design traditions of America's diverse regions and natural elements are evoked with colors, building traditions, and regional decorative motifs.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Celebrating the 100th anniversary of House Beautiful magazine, the editors have compiled House Beautiful Great Style. This lavishly illustrated (more than 300 color photos), large-format title looks at the work of today's leaders of interior design (e.g. John Saladino and Nancy Braithwaite), examines their use of materials (fabric, wood, metal, paint, etc.) and looks at stunningly decorated homes in different regions of the U.S.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688144685
Publisher:
Hearst Books
Publication date:
12/31/2001
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
9.40(w) x 11.38(h) x 0.90(d)

Read an Excerpt

PARING DOWN

Just as a moment of silence in a musical passage heightens the melody, empty space, neutral walls, or bare floors allow a room and the furniture in it to breathe. Design today is more often a matter of subtraction rather than addition as rooms are reduced to a few good pieces that are all the more striking surrounded by space.

Paring down often means that the best features of a room become more prominent: the moldings, the mantel, the honey-colored parquet. Good editing, however, does not mean that the furnishings should be stripped down to a futon and a single tulip in an ovoid vase. It can be as simple as keeping the horizon line of the furniture low to let the architectural elements of the room emerge.

FABRIC TRANSFORMATION

As Scarlett O'Hara and every designer know, personal destiny and the fate of houses can hang on a curtain. Dressing an individual and dressing a room have much in common: Fabric can transform a wallflower, or a wall.

Textiles can also have a major environmental impact, softening hard surfaces and muffling sound. Even a small dose, such as harlequin-patterned seat cushions used around a dining table, will punctuate a dTcor. And it doesn't have to cost a fortune to create a fantastic look. Designer John Saladino, for example, favors unbleached muslin, which he gently drapes over a window to create a soft dip in the middle.

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