House of Darkness House of Light: The True Story Volume Two [NOOK Book]

Overview

Roger and Carolyn Perron purchased the home of their dreams and eventual nightmares in December of 1970. The Arnold Estate, located just beyond the village of Harrisville, Rhode Island seemed the idyllic setting in which to raise a family. The couple unwittingly moved their five young daughters into the ancient and mysterious farmhouse. Secrets were kept and then revealed within a space shared by mortal and immortal alike. Time suddenly became irrelevant; fractured by spirits making their presence known then ...
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House of Darkness House of Light: The True Story Volume Two

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Overview

Roger and Carolyn Perron purchased the home of their dreams and eventual nightmares in December of 1970. The Arnold Estate, located just beyond the village of Harrisville, Rhode Island seemed the idyllic setting in which to raise a family. The couple unwittingly moved their five young daughters into the ancient and mysterious farmhouse. Secrets were kept and then revealed within a space shared by mortal and immortal alike. Time suddenly became irrelevant; fractured by spirits making their presence known then dispersing into the ether. The house is a portal to the past and a passage to the future. This is a sacred story of spiritual enlightenment, told some thirty years hence. The family is now somewhat less reticent to divulge a closely-guarded experience. Their odyssey is chronicled by the eldest sibling and is an unabridged account of a supernatural excursion. Ed and Lorraine Warren investigated this haunting in a futile attempt to intervene on their behalf. They consider the Perron family saga to be one of the most compelling and significant of a famously ghost-storied career as paranormal researchers. During a séance gone horribly wrong, they unleashed an unholy hostess; the spirit called Bathsheba...a God-forsaken soul. Perceiving herself to be mistress of the house, she did not appreciate the competition. Carolyn had long been under siege; overt threats issued in the form of fire...a mother's greatest fear. It transformed the woman in unimaginable ways. After nearly a decade the family left a once beloved home behind though it will never leave them, as each remains haunted by a memory. This tale is an inspiring testament to the resilience of the human spirit on a pathway of discovery: an eternal journey for the living and the dead
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781481712361
  • Publisher: AuthorHouse
  • Publication date: 3/7/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 45,372
  • File size: 4 MB

Read an Excerpt

House of Darkness House of Light

The True Story Volume Two


By Andrea Perron

AuthorHouse

Copyright © 2013Andrea Perron
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4817-1238-5


Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

V. GHOSTLY CRIES AND WHISPERS

"Be sober, be vigilant, because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about seeking whom he may devour."

Peter v. 8


Sensory perception is a wondrous gift of Nature. Those who listen to the whispers of spirit will be tenderly guided along, while those who deliberately provoke the dead know not what they may receive in response. It requires an inordinate amount of courage, coupled with morbid curiosity. There is such a thing as begging for trouble. It seems to obey any request, as if by command. The children had been forewarned. They'd been unwilling to listen to reason, to voices of authority; far more susceptible to absurd notions and suggestions made by friends. There would be consequences ... for every action, a reaction: science as equation. Disobedient heathens get what they deserve. You asked for it, girls! There is an indistinguishable line between bravery and stupidity.

Be watchful. Be prudent. Be wise. Be gone!

* * *

Their odyssey began as a pronouncement; the sad, diminutive clarion call. In hushed and somber tones, this communication, disguised as wind and rain, cloaked by the creaking of old clapboard, infiltrated the senses of those who had entered unfamiliar territory. In the quiet darkness of night they'd listen to the farmhouse, its whistling coos or high-pitched whining, whenever an ill wind passed through the eaves, or so they had all presumed. The busy and rambunctious household was a distraction during their days but at night the house spoke of its story to newly arrived inhabitants. During their first few months in residence, there was so much buzz and extraneous activity, the dismissal of uncommon noises was the norm. An adjustment period was necessary and no one in the family trusted their own perceptions of this house. A new place—new noises mindset explained away virtually every strange and foreign sound. The house was so big in comparison to where they had come from that the tightly compact Cape Cod in Cumberland now seemed, (as a distant memory), something no bigger than a beach bungalow. Sound was magnified and distorted within the massive structure. It was an echo chamber. It had a heartbeat. The house had an energy and a voice all its own; several, in fact. The interplay of shadow and light intermingling with its natural/supernatural sound became mesmerizing; a source of wonderment. They had willingly crossed the threshold, entering into the shared space, one filled with secrets and souls. Into a mysterious portal they ventured, finding it hypnotic by nature, casting its enchanting spells on those dwelling within its clapboard walls. There was no escaping the effect it had on a family who could not help but listen up in smoke: Attention class! Mere mortals could not ignore the gauzy haze gathering in rooms, masquerading as moonlight. Cloud cover hovering in shadow dance, an elegant disguise, Nature provided a cloak for an esoteric element of itself ... very clever camouflage.


Yet, there is no mistaking the cry of a child. Cindy would soon identify the face of the littlest ghost wailing for her mother. The moans seeping from deep within the eaves were, after some research, presumed to be the sick and pitiful sound made by Johnny Arnold, a man in the self-inflicted throes of a poisonous death. He suffered, departing life in excruciating pain; a haunting, desperate sound, as if he attempted to muffle his agony so to avoid detection. Was he unwilling to risk discovery before the deed was done?

Soon enough chanted incantations would begin. Whispered words, barely perceptible, over time became audibly intelligible. The distinctly articulated statements made no sense at all to the child suddenly struggling just to be a child, striving to grasp and interpret the cryptic pleas, to determine a source. Cynthia heard the call of seven dead soldiers buried in the wall. Come to me, little girl. Telepathic messages, conveyed within the sealed mind field of sound surrounding each recipient, altering their state-of-being. During these encounters, what Cynthia often describes as being in the bubble, all external activity was deflected as a spirit shielded itself, protected from any intrusion. It soon became apparent to five children listening with new ears, observing with new eyes ... they were not alone. They were never alone and would not ever be again. Such disturbing interludes were enlightening in this respect.

Carolyn saw the little girl, dressed up in her green velvet finery, what she would later describe as the child's burial outfit. A tiny cherub chanting with cohorts was seemingly oblivious to the terrified woman being targeted: Will drive ye out with fiery broom ... will drive ye mad with death and gloom: their unholy chapter and verse ... perhaps not so benign, after all. Footsteps in stairwells or whispers from walls, mournful cries of a child, the incantation of a crowd of souls resembling a coven of witches or the soft, soulful whine of a distant bugle—these were but a few of the distinctly disquieting sounds which they heard incessantly. Sensory perception is a gift, though as much a curse as a blessing ... as a balancing act of God.

Supernatural/psychic sound was not relegated to the farmhouse. Giggling spirits at play in the pine forest became an equally common occurrence, as if they assumed it was safe to reveal themselves in the presence of others their own age. Had they always been there? Was it something about these children which allowed their mortal eyes the ability to see all there was to behold? A heightened sensitivity developed, undoubtedly due to over-exposure. They lived among dead people. It was something none of them could ever afford to forget, not for an instant, to be on the safe side but there was no safe side. Anyone could see anything at anytime. Family pets often responded to things their humans could not see or hear, frequently alerting them to any pending manifestation. Accused of being alarmist by nature in the beginning, the dogs proved consistently reliable; keen senses quite telling. The self-doubt of mere mortals would dissipate with time. After awhile they did believe their eyes. The animals knew it all along, from the moment they arrived, precisely why they refused to cross the threshold. The sounds of silence came always with a message. "Hello darkness, my old friend. I've come to talk with you again, because a vision softly creeping left its seed while I was sleeping, and the vision that was planted in my brain still remains ... the sounds of silence". Everyone was beginning to understand. It was not the wind. It was not the rain. It was something else entirely, perhaps something wicked. Either they would have to find their way or forge a new path on this intrepid journey through another dimension while dwelling with the dead in a portal cleverly disguised as a farmhouse.

Opposing forces were about to engage in a ferocious battle as adversaries waging war within the dark confines of the borning room, against the evil in an old house. Disobedient heathens would be severely tested, admonished for the deliberate splicing of dimensions. Foolishly doing so would mean taking a terrible risk as antagonists exploring treacherous boundaries of an inherently inconceivable realm. Overtly provocative behavior functioned as the clarion call, the command to be obeyed, essentially calling on all enemy combatants: for every action ... a reaction. The children had no concept of the consequences, no idea of the power they were about to unleash as warnings went unheeded. It was destined to become a test of wills. Inviting disasters into their home, stupid girls
(Continues...)


Excerpted from House of Darkness House of Light by Andrea Perron. Copyright © 2013 by Andrea Perron. Excerpted by permission of AuthorHouse.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
( 26 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(7)

1 Star

(8)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2013

    Could have been great

    About 300 pages of story and 700 of personal pondering that could have been a few separate books. Damn shame, waste if what could have been a fantastic read.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2013

    Really

    One word to describe this book EDIT!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2013

    Hard to follow storyline, just rambles on and on and on needless

    Hard to follow storyline, just rambles on and on and on needlessly.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2013

    Rambling junk

    This junk was a waste of time, there's more rambling from this women who is trying to come across deeper and more intelligent than she actually is. The majority of it is her preaching and the little story there is to it is this disjointed, two dimensional, all over the place garbage that hardly makes sense. These books are not a well written, captivating story, they're rambling of someone who is quite out of it and these events weren't the cause of it

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2013

    A waist of $27. Dont buy it. Its clearly a person wanting money

    A waist of $27. Dont buy it. Its clearly a person wanting money incase the movie flopped. Could an editor make it a better read? Probably not.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2013

    Andrea Perron has simultaneously proven both the failure of the

    Andrea Perron has simultaneously proven both the failure of the American education system and the desperation of Hollywood in these modern times in which they'll slog for years through endless pages of drivel and sophomoric narrative padding in order to tease a semi-coherent and decently scary story out of what would otherwise be nothing more than a prime candidate for both the physical and digital recycle bins. If you can believe it, self-proclaimed "author," Andrea, actually holds an inter-disciplinary degree in philosophy and English literature from Chatham College in Pittsburgh, PA. Meaning that she actually went to school, spent the time, and paid a whole bunch of money to learn about English literature, and still produced these "novels." I don't know whether to laugh at or cry for her.

    Now having seen the movie, I can safely say that everything I wrote in my review is absolutely, completely and 100% justified; besides the names, they didn't use a single line or event from the book in the movie, much to the moviegoers' delight, I'm sure. As the "Warrens," played by Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga (who are a bajillion times more sane, logical and sympathetic than the Warrens are in real life), explain in the movie, ghosts are not able to possess people. Only demons can do that. This means that the only ghost they kept from the book, Bathsheba, is now a demon and no longer a ghost. Surprise, surprise.

    To the person who said that the movie was going to be different because it was from the "Warren Files," and more from their point of view, let me just say how funny it is that the Warrens just happened to skip over the part in the book (in Vol. 2) where the husband physically threw them out of the house and refused to let them back in and how the story, according to the movie, is now about how the Warrens have super powers and save the day sans capes and spandex.

    If you've come here after seeing the movie looking for more details about what happened in Harrisville, save your money and turn back while you can. This book has nothing to do with the movie at all (which is why the movie is so good), and will do nothing but give you a literary migraine.

    Original Review:

    I am copying and pasting my review of the first book here, because in her second book that is exactly what the author did; she just copied and pasted her first book and called it Volume 2. She did remove/stop using all the bold words, and the grammar is a little better. Someone must have turned on grammar check for her this time. Or she invested in a copy of Dragon Dictation software... or maybe she had one of her grandkids transcribe it for her. They know all about those newfangled compu-tators. Let me emphasize that it was only a *little* better, because a lot of it is still wrong.

    She still bounces around more than the steel ball in a pinball machine. She ricochets from one decade to the next without any explanation. One chapter they're a happy family, the next everyone's divorced. A duet of Manfred Mann and Bob Dylan covering Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit" would be more coherent than her writing.

    If you are wondering why I would read the second book if I hated the first one so much, let's just call it morbid curiosity. Had it not been for the improved grammar, I would have had to stop after a few pages and delete it. I did want to see if Andrea had improved as a writer, and more importantly I felt that this book couldn't possibly be any worse than the first. For $3.49 it was worth the gamble.

    So how did Andrea come up with a whole new book after putting down on paper every single thought she's ever had in the last book? I can just picture it... *wavy imagination lines*

    Andrea: I did it! I just finished my first book!

    EVERYONE ELSE: Good, now maybe you'll stop telling *us* all of your boring stories over and over again.

    Andrea: But I have so much more to tell!

    EVERYONE SHE HAS EVER KNOWN: For the love of God, put it in another book and leave us out of it!

    Andrea: But it wouldn't fill another book!

    Andrea's Grandchild in the Fifth Grade: Do what I do, Gramma! Just keep repeating yourself until you have enough pages! My teacher never notices, so I'm sure none of your readers will!

    Andrea: Brilliant! I'll add a few chapters about the Warrens, a dash about my dad's infidelity, a sprinkle about my mom's mortally-challenged friends and the paste it back into the descriptions of feelings and philosophy that I rambled on about in my last book! All done!

    Andrea's Publisher, Fresh From a Car Crash Resulting in a Severe Head Injury: I'd love to publish this! It's the burst thing I read in ever my life... *begins to drool on the manuscript*

    The bit about the Warrens was really the only thing that held my interest. I will give her credit that she did show how unscrupulous the Warren's were/are. I've known for years they were complete fame-whores and frauds, and it's nice to hear from the horse's mouth that it's all true. Other than that, my review of the first book works perfectly for this book.
    ___________________________________________________________________________

    Let me begin my diatribe, if you'll indulge me, fair reader, with a disturbing trend I've noticed in the reviews on this book. Almost all of the people who gave it a 5 star rating, or even a slightly positive review, are from or around the town the book is written in, Harrisville, Rhode Island. Apparently these people are desperate for some vicarious fame by association with the town this dreadfully written book takes place in. Read them with a grain of salt. If you're looking for an honest review from someone who is not skeptical of the supernatural, just critical of this, and I use the term loosely, "author's" work, then please read on for a detailed, unbiased review.

    I think the reason it took Andrea 30 years to write this book was that she needed to read "The Amityville Horror", "The Devil in Connecticut" and "In a Dark Place: The Story of a True Haunting" a few times so she could steal as much of their stories as possible for her own. She also needed time to wait for Poltergeist, Burnt Offerings and the Exorcist to come out on DVD so she could watch them all a few times (and their special features!) for some new ideas. This book is nothing but a derivative retelling of better, scarier ghost stories. All she did was put her own family into the roles of other, more interesting characters; your basic "fanfic," if you will. The funny part is, I could have lived with that if not for the horrible writing. A good story is a good story, even if the general theme has told before. But even a great story loses its gravitas and poignancy when told by a seven year old, which is about Andrea's level of writing. Well, to be fair, it's more like a seven year old who knows how to press Shift+F7 in Word and come up with bigger words to use from the list of synonyms, but who then overlooks the green squiggles of the Grammar Check function. She also entertained the infamous nutbags, Ed and Lorraine Warren. All you have to do is a quick Google search on them and you will find out how untrustworthy these two are. Being they also worked on the Amityville case and the two Connecticut cases, I can see why this story features all of their greatest hits: who could forget the classic, "It must be a DEMON," or "The spirit is mocking the Holy Trinity," and the ever delightful, "Of course we have no proof of ANYTHING, you're supposed to just believe whatever we say!" Could it be mere coincidence that Harrisville reeks of the same pseudo-religious, quasi-supernatural hokum featured in Amityville and Connecticut? I think not!

    Let's start with Andrea's grammar and punctuation. She loves to put about 3 bold

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2013

    This book could've been good, but all the writer does is ramble

    This book could've been good, but all the writer does is ramble on and on about NOTHING!!! It's extremely annoying and a complete waste of money. Don't even waste ur time getting this book. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2014

    Scary stuff

    I know a lot of people gave bad reviews because there was alot of rambling and pondering, which i agree with that. But, this familys story is so scary and facinating i did enjoy both books. Yes it was wordy and a lot could have been left out but if you like a good haunting this is for you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2014

    Yarrowfire

    Yarrowfire. 12 moons. Warrior. LightClan. Tom. Off white, black star on left ear et yellow eyes. Kin. Playful et energetic. Ask.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2013

    Anonymous on October 30, 2013

    This could have been a fantastic book but it in need of editing. Also was hard to follow because it had no time sequence and just rambled on and on. Too bad it wasn't as good as the movie . It should have been better.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2013

    Great story but bad writing

    Lots of rambling and the storyline jumps around making it hard to follow. I think its a great story told by an amature writer. This book did have very interesting parts followed by lengthy repetitive ramblings. Worth reading but not fantastic.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2013

    Too much rambling.

    Just tell the story. Lose all the stupid metaphors.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2013

    poorly written

    What a disappointment. This "poor child" as she so often refers to herself, has written one of the worst books I have ever read.

    She is wordy and doesn't follow any sort of timeline. I felt sorry for Roger.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2013

    A fantastic story

    I know this needed some editing but it sure lived up to it's name. There was darkness, evil. There was light, revelation and god. Both equally important and transformative, let it be.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2013

    Great books!

    Amazing story and a little terrifying!! But quite amazing.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2013

    Awesome story !!!

    A must read !!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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