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House of Rain: Tracking a Vanished Civilization Across the American Southwest
     

House of Rain: Tracking a Vanished Civilization Across the American Southwest

3.6 6
by Craig Childs
 

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The greatest "unsolved mystery" of the American Southwest is the fate of the Anasazi, the native peoples who in the eleventh century converged on Chaco Canyon (in today's southwestern New Mexico) and built what has been called the Las Vegas of its day, a flourishing cultural center that attracted pilgrims from far and wide, a vital crossroads of the

Overview

The greatest "unsolved mystery" of the American Southwest is the fate of the Anasazi, the native peoples who in the eleventh century converged on Chaco Canyon (in today's southwestern New Mexico) and built what has been called the Las Vegas of its day, a flourishing cultural center that attracted pilgrims from far and wide, a vital crossroads of the prehistoric world. The Anasazis' accomplishments - in agriculture, in art, in commerce, in architecture, and in engineering - were astounding, rivaling those of the Mayans in distant Central America. By the thirteenth century, however, the Anasazi were gone from Chaco. Vanished. What was it that brought about the rapid collapse of their civilization? Was it drought? pestilence? war? forced migration? mass murder or suicide? For many years conflicting theories have abounded. Craig Childs draws on the latest scholarly research, as well as on a lifetime of adventure and exploration in the most forbidding landscapes of the American Southwest, to shed new light on this compelling mystery.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780759518575
Publisher:
Little, Brown and Company
Publication date:
02/22/2007
Sold by:
Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
244,886
File size:
18 MB
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This product may take a few minutes to download.

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House of Rain: Tracking a Vanished Civilization Across the American Southwest 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Almond001 More than 1 year ago
The so-called Anasazi were not a homogenous block of people. They were a very loose collection of very diverse peoples who moved back and forth across the ancient American landscape. Centuries before Columbus, Pissaro, and Father Kino (Tucsonans know who he is), the semi-nomadic puebloans established a relatively high-functioning civilization scattered across four states in the desert southwest. This account does a more-than-fair job in tracking those peoples as they traversed this land.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you have a background in this feild and have done some previous reading - this is a thoughtful explanation of what might have become of these people. If this is your first entry into a complicated mystery, you might do well to read some of the authors previous books. There are also others who could articulate some background. Know that Childs writes from frist hand experience; being on the land he describes. The book is excellent but maybe a tough 'starting point' for someone just getting on board with this subject.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have lived in and traveled in the areas covered by the author for 40 years. I am an avid reader of all things historical about the region. I thought this was one of the best books I have read ever! I was fascinated by the depth of his knowledge and his research. I was also impressed with the amount of his on foot research and I loved his storytelling style.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bozeman26 More than 1 year ago
This book tells of adventure perceived by author Craig Childs and his partner Adam. It tells of how Craig and Adam battle through flash floods, high heat, and hard terrain to find a conclusion to the very mysterious Chaco Canyon. They seek discover what Chaco Canyon and the Anasazi native people represented in the past. They seek to find artifacts and signs that will give the Anasazi people a home and Chaco Canyon a final representation. It shows pictures of things discovered in the ancient buildings. It is a great book for poeple looking to find the facts. It describes a realistic adventure, but if you are looking for a great adventure book I don't recommend this book. It is full of great imagery, facts, and is very well written. It is less of a book more a diary of searching Chaco Canyon. The writing and facts make me give the book a 6 out of 10. Not the best book yet it is still a good read. I really like how in this book Craig Childs discussed his adventures but then linked something he saw to a prediction of how the Anasazi people could have used the land to their advantage. I also liked how the things stated by Craig supported many theories. Yet I didn't like how slow the book was at some points. Also I didn't like how sometimes he went away from his adventure to state numerous vast amounts of facts.
s70fan More than 1 year ago
Having lived in the land talked about in this book and having visited and walked many of the places described by the author I can say that for me, this author sets these places in proper context.

That is, this book does an excellent job of describing the feel of these ancient places.

Everything else is still a matter of conjecture.
Guest More than 1 year ago
At one point Childs writes '13 major cliff dwellings stand in this canyon.' Then, soon, he adds, 'Nobody is here now.' That's the problem I suppose. We move from now to then and then back again - with no idea of why we are in either place. The author wants to wander. That is his choice and wonderful for him - so long as he is afoot and not on a page. It is more than a page and a passage I had hoped he would share with me. A wonderful exploration. Sad to say I see it it as a journey he pursues alone.
Runningdeer8 More than 1 year ago
For anyone interested in this subject, it is a must read! Easy reading and very informative.