House of Suns

House of Suns

4.4 58
by Alastair Reynolds
     
 

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Six million years ago, at the dawn of the star-faring era, Abigail Gentian fractured herself into a thousand male and female clones, which she called shatterlings. But now, someone is eliminating the Gentian line. Campion and Purslane-two shatterlings who have fallen in love and shared forbidden experiences-must determine exactly who, or what, their enemy is, before… See more details below

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Overview

Six million years ago, at the dawn of the star-faring era, Abigail Gentian fractured herself into a thousand male and female clones, which she called shatterlings. But now, someone is eliminating the Gentian line. Campion and Purslane-two shatterlings who have fallen in love and shared forbidden experiences-must determine exactly who, or what, their enemy is, before they are wiped out of existence.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Reynolds (The Prefect) returns to the universe of his 2005 novella "Thousandth Night" in this sprawling novel of intergalactic intrigue. It is 6.4 million years in the future and humanity has spread throughout the Milky Way. Some cultures have established transient empires across space; others, the Lines, have used relativistic travel to colonize deep time. Clone-siblings Campion and Purslane are delayed on their way to a Gentian Line reunion, a coincidence that saves them from a massacre. Allied with potentially hostile Machine People and an enigmatic post-human god called the Spirit, armed only with fragmentary records and hints that Campion's research provoked the mysterious House of Suns, the Gentian survivors struggle to find and stop their enemies before the genocide can be completed. Intriguing ideas and competent characterization make this a fine example of grand-scale relativistic space opera. (June)

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Kirkus Reviews
Far-future, galaxy-spanning space opera involving clones, robots, mass murder and hundreds of post-human cultures, some alive, most extinct, set in a universe different than Reynolds' Revelation Space yarns (Diamond Dogs, Turquoise Days, 2005, etc.). Six million years ago, from a civilization known as the Golden Hour, the House of Flowers-comprising the thousand male and female immortal clones, or "shatterlings," of Abigail Gentian-set off to explore the galaxy. Every 200,000 years they meet up to celebrate and share memories. Since they travel at sublight speeds, most of this time is spent in stasis, so they do not so much live history as tunnel through it, as one of the characters observes. It's often a weakness, since readers are afforded glimpses of dozens of cultures without being offered involvement in any. Our alternating narrators-a third narrative strand features Abigail becoming addicted to a simulated-reality role-playing game, for reasons that only become clear much later-impetuous, courageous Campion and smarter, more empathic Purslane, are an item, against House rules. They're running late for the next reunion and need ship repairs. A piratical post-human named Ateshga attempts to trick Campion, but Purslane outwits him and rescues memory-impaired Hesperus. The three reach the reunion site 50 years late, only to learn that the Flowers have been ambushed and all but wiped out. Campion and Hesperus rescue a handful of Gentians-50 out of a surviving 900-odd. But why the slaughter, and who did it? Believe it or not, the Andromeda Galaxy is a major plot issue. Absorbing, but lacking the edgy brilliance and almost desperate urgency of the Revelation novels.
From the Publisher
"Intriguing ideas and competent characterization make this a fine example of grand-scale relativistic space opera." —Publishers Weekly

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101061275
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/02/2009
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
576
Sales rank:
108,062
File size:
1 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

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From the Publisher
"Intriguing ideas and competent characterization make this a fine example of grand-scale relativistic space opera." —-Publishers Weekly

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