The House of the Seven Gables (Norton Critical Edition) / Edition 1

The House of the Seven Gables (Norton Critical Edition) / Edition 1

3.2 64
by Nathaniel Hawthorne, Robert S. Levine
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 0393924769

ISBN-13: 9780393924763

Pub. Date: 11/01/2005

Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.

This all-new edition of Hawthorne’s celebrated 1851 novel is based on The Ohio State University Press’s Centenary Edition of the Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne.
It is accompanied by thorough explanatory annotations and an insightful introduction to the novel and antebellum culture by Robert S. Levine.
"Contexts" brings together a generous selection

Overview

This all-new edition of Hawthorne’s celebrated 1851 novel is based on The Ohio State University Press’s Centenary Edition of the Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne.
It is accompanied by thorough explanatory annotations and an insightful introduction to the novel and antebellum culture by Robert S. Levine.
"Contexts" brings together a generous selection of primary materials intended to provide readers with background on the novel’s central themes. Historical documents include accounts of Salem’s history by Thomas Maule, Robert Calef, Joseph B. Felt, and Charles W. Upham, which Hawthorne drew on for The House of the Seven Gables. The importance of the house in antebellum America—as a manifestation of the body, a site of genealogical history, and a symbol of the republic’s middle class—is explored through the diverse writings of William Andrus Alcott, Edgar Allan Poe, and J. H. Agnew, among others. The impact of technological developments on the novel, especially of daguerreotypy, is considered through the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Gustave de Beaumont, and Alexis de Tocqueville, among others. Also included are two of Hawthorne’s literary sketches—"Alice Doane’s Appeal" and "The Old Apple Dealer"—that demonstrate the continuity of Hawthorne’s style, from his earlier periodical writing to his later career as a novelist.
"Criticism" provides a comprehensive overview of the critical commentary on the novel from its publication to the present. Among the twenty-seven critics represented are Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Henry James, Nina Baym, Eric Sundquist, Richard H. Millington, Alan Trachtenberg, Amy Schrager Lang, and Christopher Castiglia.
A Chronology and Selected Bibliography are also included.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393924763
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
11/01/2005
Series:
Norton Critical Editions Series
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
502
Sales rank:
410,936
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.10(d)

Table of Contents

Introductionvii
Suggestions for Further Readingxxxv
A Note on the Textxxxix
The House of the Seven Gables1
Notes321

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The House of the Seven Gables 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 64 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
read this book years a go great book, you do no understand the book until you travel there and see the house in real life .. the house is something to see,to see how he lived hundred years ago is some to see. loved the hiding stair case .. they dont build houses and counting house like that any more.. any one who doesnt like the book needs to go see the house ..
Guest More than 1 year ago
'The House of the Seven Gables' is a more difficult but potentially more rewarding book than the more popular 'Scarlet Letter.' In 'The House of the Seven Gables' Hawthorne is, in effect, arguing with himself about man's nature--are we all subject to original sin? He sets the novel inside a mansion that has been cursed from its very beginning because its owner stole part of the house's land from someone who didn't have as much legal influence. Thus cursed, the house became a gloomy haven for a decayed and decadent aristocracy for the following 180 years, roughly 1665-1845. Like the house, are we cursed by original sin, condemned to repeat the patterns of our ancestors? (There are other interpretations of this book; I'm just leading with the most common one.) Hawthorne would best be described as a romantic realist. His narrative style is free of the supernatural but it is rife with symbolism--and often he will interpret the symbolism for you! There is not much 'action' in the conventional sense; a person could describe the goings-on in the book in ten minutes, including flashbacks. The novel's resolution will surprise you--but there still are some fundamental questions that haven't been answered! Hawthorne depends on descriptions for much of his work--e.g., how a particular rose looks on a particular morning, and that ties in with all the symbolism. As was common in Victorian times, sentence length was 2-3 times longer than today, with compound/ complex sentences the norm. If you can read Dickens without difficulty, though, you can read this book too. I'd recommend 'The House of the Seven Gables' for anyone interested in quality American literature, especially the early realist period, for people interested in how the Puritan strain haunted (haunts?) Americans, or indeed just for an interesting tale that is told with very little action, mostly mood and symbolism.
Anonymous 6 months ago
There were little errors here and there that while annoying and inconvenient I did my best to ignore them. I had to stop reading when I got to page 72 and it was missing a page or so to where I felt I had missed something.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the kind of book i like to curl up with on the sofa and read with an apple- and i dont give that praise lightly! I luv Hawthorne. Of course, im only on the 5th or 6th chapter
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Rated it 3only because of the garbled script, what i could read of this book was exelent
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This version has a lot of problems with words being misspelled. It is hard to read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kara Smith More than 1 year ago
Completely agree after seeing the incredible property love this book even more!