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House of the Sleeping Beauties
     

House of the Sleeping Beauties

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by Yasunari Kawabata
 

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Three erotically charged short stories from Yasunari Kawabata, the first Japanese winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature.

In the tales in this collection, Nobel Prize-winning author Yasunari Kawabata

Overview

Three erotically charged short stories from Yasunari Kawabata, the first Japanese winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature.

In the tales in this collection, Nobel Prize-winning author Yasunari Kawabata probes the interplay of erotic fantasy and reality in the minds of three lonely men. In ”House of the Sleeping Beauties,” an old man pays to sleep with—but not touch—beautiful, sedated young girls; in ”One Arm,” a young woman gifts a man her right arm for the night; and in ”Of Birds and Beasts,” a middle-aged man’s memories of an affair with a dancer mingle with glimpses of his abnormal attachment to his pets. Piercing examinations of sexuality and human psychology—and works of remarkable subtlety and beauty—the stories in House of the Sleeping Beauties and Other Stories, translated by Edward Seidensticker, showcase one of the twentieth century’s great writers—in any language—at his very best.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780525434146
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
11/28/2017
Series:
Vintage International
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
160

Meet the Author

Yasunari Kawabata, winner of the 1968 Nobel Prize for Literature, is one of Japan's most distinguished novelists. Born in Osaka in 1899, he published his first stories while he was still in high school. He graduated from Tokyo Imperial University in 1924. His story "The Izu Dancer," first published in 1925, appeared in The Atlantic Monthly in 1955. Among his major novels published in the United States are Snow Country (1956), The Master of Go (1972), and Beauty and Sadness (1975). Kawabata was found dead, by his own hand, in 1972.