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House of the Winds
     

House of the Winds

5.0 2
by Mia Yun
 

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1960s Korea. A girl stands in the middle of a sunny patch with her mother. The air is full of butterflies (the souls of little children in afternoon naps) and secrets (although they were not secrets at the time).

House of Winds is a portrait of a family whose lives have been deeply affected by the tumultuous long years of Japanese rule and The Korean War.

Overview

1960s Korea. A girl stands in the middle of a sunny patch with her mother. The air is full of butterflies (the souls of little children in afternoon naps) and secrets (although they were not secrets at the time).

House of Winds is a portrait of a family whose lives have been deeply affected by the tumultuous long years of Japanese rule and The Korean War. And it is the story of one mother and one daughter. Young Wife is a magic-wand mother who tells stories of the times when tigers smoked pipes. One day her white summer blouse runs deep red, mango-red and azalea pink. Who knows from where this sudden sadness sprouted?

Her youngest daughter is our guide through this world in which an American electric iron is so powerful it sets off a coup d'etat. The daughter begins to see "how Korean women, descendents of the she-bear woman and the son of the king of heaven, lived in the folds of history...laughing, wailing, spirit-cajoling, poetry-writing, tear-hiding, bosom-bracing, scheming, fire-breathing."

Editorial Reviews

Heather Harlan
...[A] poignant debut novel about the struggles of women raising families alone in the aftermath of the Japanese occupation and Korean War....Don't forget the tissues.
AsianWeek
Library Journal
The story of a girl's childhood in Korea, Yun's first novel is a warm and vivid reminiscence of the relationship between a girl and her mother. The Korea of her memories was occupied by the Japanese, whose harsh rule was followed by the devastation of the Korean War. Young Wife, her mother, is a quietly courageous woman who keeps her three children together. Though abandoned by her husband, she manages to provide food, clothing, shelter, and schooling while she nourishes the children's souls with tales of a forgotten, peaceful time in Korea: a time when tigers smoked pipes and history, tradition, and magic blended together to create an exciting, viable culture. Eloquently written in language that is both metaphorical and poetic, this is an excellent addition to the series.--Janis Williams, Shaker Heights P.L., OH

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781566563055
Publisher:
Interlink Publishing Group, Incorporated
Publication date:
10/01/1998
Series:
Emerging Voices Series
Pages:
219
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.00(d)

What People are Saying About This

Cynthia Ozick
Her imagination flowers into startling fresh imagery. Her sentences are pure, simple and exquisitely shaded: they have an airy, eerie quality (eerie in the sense of being distant and near). . . It is time for Mia Yun's distinctive and enriching talent, rooted in a vision utterly new to our marveling eyes, to find the wider recognition it deserves
Rebecca Stowe
[A] beautifully told story of a young girl growing up in a Korea emerging from the devastation of occupation and civil war. Intertwining memory, myth, dreams and imagination, the young narrator captures a world in which the old and the new, the innocent and the cunning, the East and the West, all clash and embrace. . . Each Chapter is like a panel of a delicately painted screen, depicting a small -- and exotic, to Western eyes -- world unto itself. But ultimately, Yun unfolds the screen to reveal a much larger -- and unexpectedly familiar -- vista.
Barney Rosset
Through the haunting and evocative prose of Mia Yun's fine novel, we see, feel, and know a Korea which until now, despite our participation in its modern day civil war, has yet remained hidden from us. She beautifully melds Korea's enduring strength, achievements, and above all, its tragic past within an almost contemporary setting. . . The voice of a Korean woman who will be heard (Barney Rosset, founder of Grove Press).

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House of the Winds 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If your looking for a book that will take you into another world, then this is the book. It's a well written book. I read it one sitting. Mia Has done a wonderful job capturing the reader. You almost feel like your there with the child and experiencing what the 60's and 70's were like after the Korean War. Also you get a better grip of what a struggle it has been for Women in Korean Society. There aren't many book out there anymore tht are well written like this one. Mia wrote this in English and then later translated into her native tongue. What a Amazing job!! I suggest this book to anyone, no matter your nationality!
Guest More than 1 year ago
If your looking for a book that will take you into another world,then this is the book. It's a well written book. I read it one sitting. Mia Has done a wonderful job capturing the reader. You almost feel like your there with the child and experiencing what the 60's and 70's were like after the Korean war. Also you get a better grip of what a struggle it has been for Women in Korean Society. There aren't many book out there anymore tht are well written like this one. Mia wrote this in English and then later translated into her native tongue.What a Amazing job!! I suggest this book to anyone, no matter their nationality!