House Seen From Nowhere

House Seen From Nowhere

by Keith Waldrop
     
 

Poetry. In Keith Waldrop's THE HOUSE SEEN FROM NOWHERE, we are invited into a meditational drift that explores the 'tense emptiness' of being . The construction of all that surrounds us, the carpentry, wavers between order and the instability of order, is manifest in syntax and etymology. In this house, which is all things-body, fortress, residence, logic,

Overview


Poetry. In Keith Waldrop's THE HOUSE SEEN FROM NOWHERE, we are invited into a meditational drift that explores the 'tense emptiness' of being . The construction of all that surrounds us, the carpentry, wavers between order and the instability of order, is manifest in syntax and etymology. In this house, which is all things-body, fortress, residence, logic, language, mortality-we find mirrors, echoes, and spirits: "the figures light/delineates not/the light itself." Where we might use Zeno's Paradox to understand the relation between the knower and the known, it is in Keith's house that we find the paradox of 'empty distinctions,' a tension between asymmetrical opposites. The house exists "not to inclose but/to include//without redemption."

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Co-publisher of 25-year-old Burning Deck Press, professor of English at Brown University and recipient of the rank of Chevalier des arts et des letters by the French government, Waldrop is an eminence grise of experimental American poetry, and the conduit through which dozens of younger poets have discovered the international avant-garde. In his 16th collection, dedicated to the Oulipo-associated writer Jacques Roubaud, Waldrop collects seven serial poems, meditations on being and nothingness, in the persona of a philosopher in his twilight years. Not wishing to recapitulate the past, and seeing only forgetting and death in the future, the poems focus almost preternaturally on the still point of the present, so that "From one window to the next the seasons turn round-spring flowers in the front yard while the kitchen gives onto ice and snow." Waldrop's lines are as clean as Williams's, if more Euclidean. And despite his explorations of linguistic logic, it is the things of this world, like a red traffic light, that serve as beacons of faith and joy. There is no irritable reaching after mystical lyricism in this Kansas-born student of French poetry, just the austere eloquence inherent in the search for a stable metaphysics that could occupy the place of spiritual solace, if not (as it happens, the last word in the book) redemption. (Feb.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780972333108
Publisher:
Litmus Press
Publication date:
01/28/2003
Pages:
230
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author


Keith Waldrop is author of numerous collections of poetry and is the translator of The Selected Poems of Edmond Jabes, as well as works by Claude Royet-Journoud, Anne-Marie Albiach and Jean Grosjean. He has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and DAAD (Berlin). His titles include HEGEL'S FAMILY, THE OPPOSITE OF LETTING THE MIND WANDER: SELECTED POEMS AND A FEW SONGS, SHIPWRECK IN HAVEN: TRANSCENDENTAL STUDIES, The Balustrade, Light While There is Light, THE LOCALITY PRINCIPLE, ANALOGIES OF ESCAPE and HAUNT. He has twice been nominated for the National Book Award: for his first book of poetry, A Windmill Near Calvary (University of Michigan, 1968); and his most recent, Transcendental Studies: A Trilogy (University of California Press, 2009), which won. With his wife Rosmarie Waldrop he co-edits Burning Deck Press. He lives in Providence, Rhode Island, and teaches at Brown University.

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