Houses of Philip Johnson

Houses of Philip Johnson

by Stover Jenkins, David Mohney
     
 

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Philip Johnson's Glass House (1949) in New Canaan, Connecticut is one of the great works of twentieth-century architecture. Ironically, its fame has obscured Johnson's many other notable residential projects, which are surveyed here for the first time. This elegant book, organized around a dozen or so of the architect's key houses, gives

Overview

Philip Johnson's Glass House (1949) in New Canaan, Connecticut is one of the great works of twentieth-century architecture. Ironically, its fame has obscured Johnson's many other notable residential projects, which are surveyed here for the first time. This elegant book, organized around a dozen or so of the architect's key houses, gives special attention to the Glass House and to its impact on other residential designs, by Johnson and by others. David Mohney and Stover Jenkins cover the full range of Johnson's domestic architecture, with emphasis on his exploration of several recurring elements, including the inventive use of courtyards, the distinctions between private and public space, and the close attention he has always paid to how his buildings are sited within the landscape. In addition to analyzing these key works, the authors have discovered a number of fascinating, little-known Johnson house designs, many of which were either never built or so altered over the years that they can be understood only through the drawings and plans presented here. The informative text is complemented by Steven Brooke's unusually handsome photographs, which capture how Johnson used light, space, and landscape to create some of modernism's most appealing houses. As an afterword, the book includes a penetrating essay by architectural historian Neil Levine, who argues that we must now recognize Johnson's publication of the article "Glass House" in 1950 as a turning point in the recognition of modernism as a historical movement.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal - Library Journal
Philip Johnson has had a very long and influential career. While his own small "pavilion" the Glass House (1949) is still his best-known domestic design, this survey analyzes a modest output of houses over six decades. Like most architects, Johnson started off designing houses, the majority of which are austere Modernist works from the 1950s. Later domestic designs, including various buildings for Johnson's own property, are eclectic or expressionistic. Architect authors Jenkins, a former Johnson associate, and Mohney (Seaside: Making a Town in America) clearly show how Johnson's houses have evolved in style while maintaining certain design principles. An afterword by Neil Levine focuses on the significance of the Glass House. Photography by Steven Brooke enhances this book. Recommended for large academic libraries. David R. Conn, Surrey P.L., B.C. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780789208385
Publisher:
Abbeville Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/28/2004
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
10.22(w) x 10.56(h) x 1.01(d)

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