How Carrots Won the Trojan War: Curious (but True) Stories of Common Vegetables [NOOK Book]

Overview

How Carrots Won the Trojan War is a delightful collection of little-known stories about the origins, legends, and historical significance of 23 of the world?s most popular vegetables. Curious cooks, gardeners, and casual readers alike will be fascinated by these far-fetched tales of their favorite foods? pasts. Readers will discover why Roman gladiators were massaged with onion juice before battle, how celery contributed to Casanova?s conquests, how peas almost poisoned General Washington, and why some ...
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How Carrots Won the Trojan War: Curious (but True) Stories of Common Vegetables

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Overview

How Carrots Won the Trojan War is a delightful collection of little-known stories about the origins, legends, and historical significance of 23 of the world’s most popular vegetables. Curious cooks, gardeners, and casual readers alike will be fascinated by these far-fetched tales of their favorite foods’ pasts. Readers will discover why Roman gladiators were massaged with onion juice before battle, how celery contributed to Casanova’s conquests, how peas almost poisoned General Washington, and why some seventeenth-century turnips were considered degenerate.

How Carrots Won the Trojan War is the perfect book for vegetable gardeners, foodies, and anyone else interested in the secret stories behind a salad.
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Editorial Reviews

New York Journal of Books
“Rebecca Rupp has done us the favor of serving up a savory history of something many of us don’t think much about—vegetables. . . . How Carrots Won the Trojan War assembles a palatable cornucopia of these stories, both satisfying and delicious.”
Chicago Tribune
"Honestly, this might be the most delightful, laugh-yourself-silly title to make its way onto the garden bookshelf in a long, long time."
Edible Notes

“Rebecca Rupp has done us the favor of serving up a savory history of something many of us don’t think much about—vegetables. . . . How Carrots Won the Trojan War assembles a palatable cornucopia of these stories, both satisfying and delicious.”
From the Publisher

"Honestly, this might be the most delightful, laugh-yourself-silly title to make its way onto the garden bookshelf in a long, long time."

How Carrots Won the Trojan War: Curious (But True) Stories of Common Vegetables is a delightful romp into the history of the vegetables gracing our common tables from noted expert and author Rebecca Rupp.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781603427869
  • Publisher: Storey Books
  • Publication date: 10/7/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 615,285
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Rebecca Rupp has written more than a dozen books for children and adults, including Weather! and How Carrots Won the Trojan War. She holds a PhD in cell biology and biochemistry and has written hundreds of articles for magazines, including Country Journal, Early American Life, Mother Earth News, Natural History, and Utne Reader. She lives in Vermont.

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Vegetables In and Out of the Garden
One: In Which Asparagus Seduces the King of France
Two: In Which Beans Beat Back the Dark Ages
Three: In Which Beets Make Victorian Belles Blush
Four: In Which Cabbage Confounds Diogenes
Five: In Which Carrots Win the Trojan War
Six: In Which Celery Contributes to Casanova's Conquests
Seven: In Which Corn Creates Vampires
Eight: In Which Cucumbers Imitate Pigeons
Nine: In Which An Eggplant Causes a Holy Man to Faint
Ten: In Which Lettuce Puts Insomniacs to Sleep
Eleven: In Which Melons Undermine Mark Twain's Morals
Twelve: In Which Onions Offend Don Quixote
Thirteen: In Which Peas Almost Poison General Washington
Fourteen: In Which Peppers Win the Nobel Prize
Fifteen: In Which Potatoes Baffle the Conquistadors
Sixteen: In Which Pumpkins Attend the World's Fair
Seventeen: In Which Radishes Identify Witches
Eighteen: In Which Spinach Deceives a Generation of Children
Nineteen: In Which Tomatoes Fail to Kill Colonel Johnson
Twenty: In Which Turnips Make a Viscount Famous
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2011

    Really good!!!

    Reminds me of amy stewart's wicked plants book. Great book, but it can be a little long. I would recommend this book for gardeners.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2013

    Elders den

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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