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How Did That Get in My Lunchbox?: The Story of Food
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How Did That Get in My Lunchbox?: The Story of Food

by Chris Butterworth
 

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Fresh retro artwork lures little readers on a tasty trip to farms, dairies, and more. Yum!

The best part of a young child’s day is often opening a lunchbox and diving in. But how did all that delicious food get there? Who made the bread for the sandwich? What about the cheese inside? Who plucked the fruit? And where did the chocolate in that cookie get

Overview

Fresh retro artwork lures little readers on a tasty trip to farms, dairies, and more. Yum!

The best part of a young child’s day is often opening a lunchbox and diving in. But how did all that delicious food get there? Who made the bread for the sandwich? What about the cheese inside? Who plucked the fruit? And where did the chocolate in that cookie get its start? From planting wheat to mixing flour into dough, climbing trees to machine-squeezing fruit, picking cocoa pods to stirring a vat of melted bliss, here is a clear, engaging look at the steps involved in producing some common foods. Healthy tips and a peek at basic food groups complete the menu.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
With reader-directed prose and cheerfully retro artwork, Butterworth and Gaggiotti use a balanced meal—sandwich, fruit, veggies, juice box, and cookie—to explain how foodstuffs make it from farms, dairies, and factories into kids' lunches. It's clear that the book's goal is encouraging kids to truly think about their food: how it's made and where it comes from, yes, but also how it tastes ("Bite into your cheese—it's creamy and smooth, but tasty, too—and TINGLY on your tongue!") and what it does for their bodies. If it feels a tad optimistic given the modern dominance of frozen, fast, and processed food, it's an accessible primer for families looking to foster healthy habits. Ages 5–8. (Jan.)
Children's Literature - Anne Pechnyo
Children eat lunch every day, but do they know where each piece of food came from? Filling a void, Butterworth seeks to inform young readers about the processes involved in taking food from the Earth to a child's lunchbox. From bread, to tomatoes, to a chocolate chip in a cookie, Butterworth and Gaggotti pair simple, explanatory text with retro illustrations to inform even the youngest readers about the food they eat. The production process of each food is sequenced in an easy to understand timeline, followed by a brief narrative describing the taste of each food. Gaggiotti's vivid illustrations are sure to draw in young listeners and keep early readers engaged in the text. When shared with students, this text can serve as an addition to units about nutrition, nonfiction texts, or explorations into timelines and sequence. Included is a re-inspired food pyramid presented as a pie chart on a plate and an index. Reviewer: Anne Pechnyo
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—Focusing on the contents of one child's lunchbox, Butterworth describes where the bread, cheese, tomatoes, apple juice, carrots, chocolate chips, and a clementine come from and how they get to local stores. The author explains how these products are grown and manufactured, and attention is paid to the many workers involved in the process. The production of each item is described on a spread, with a solid black font and accompanying illustrations arranged in flow-chart style. The sometimes-wordy text and detailed artwork work well together to identify the processing steps. Concluding comments note the importance of drinking water, eating breakfast, exercising, and consuming both vegetables and fruits. The energetic mixed-media artwork, populated with smiling workers, perks up the writing. Small details tucked within the illustrations would be best seen when reading the book one-on-one. Patterned endpapers showcase a repetitive selection of foods. A great springboard to units on food and nutrition.—Lynn Vanca, Freelance Librarian, Akron, OH

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763650056
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
01/25/2011
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
260,396
Product dimensions:
8.75(w) x 10.25(h) x 0.25(d)
Lexile:
870L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Chris Butterworth is the author of Sea Horse: The Shyest Fish in the Sea, winner of a John Muir prize for natural history writing. The author of many nonfiction books for children, she lives in Cornwall, England.

Lucia Gaggiotti is a graphic designer, packager, and illustrator whose images of food have been used by many food companies in London, including Carluccios and Pizza Express. She lives in London.

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