How Do I Save My Honor?: War, Moral Integrity, and Principled Resignation [NOOK Book]

Overview

How Do I Save My Honor? is a powerful exploration of individual moral responsibility in a time of war. When people decide that the actions of their government have violated basic norms of ethics and justice, what are they to do? Are there degrees of moral responsibility that public officials, soldiers, and private citizens bear for unethical actions of their leaders and government? William F. Felice considers these central ethical questions through the compelling stories of individuals in the U.S. and British ...
See more details below
How Do I Save My Honor?: War, Moral Integrity, and Principled Resignation

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$15.99
BN.com price
(Save 44%)$28.99 List Price

Overview

How Do I Save My Honor? is a powerful exploration of individual moral responsibility in a time of war. When people decide that the actions of their government have violated basic norms of ethics and justice, what are they to do? Are there degrees of moral responsibility that public officials, soldiers, and private citizens bear for unethical actions of their leaders and government? William F. Felice considers these central ethical questions through the compelling stories of individuals in the U.S. and British government and military who struggled to protect their moral integrity during the Iraq war and occupation. Some came to the difficult conclusion that resignation from their post was necessary to maintain their responsibility to the truth and to uphold their honor. Others decided to work from within to try to correct what they perceived as misguided policies. Examining the struggles of these contemporary men and women, as well as of historical figures facing similar dilemmas, William Felice weighs the profound difficulties of overcoming the intense pressures of misguided loyalty, patriotism, and groupthink that predominate during war.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

That iconic Bush administration dilemma-how should military or State Department functionaries have registered their opposition to the Iraq War?-is mulled over in this philosophical treatise-cum-antiwar manifesto. Taking Colin Powell as an object lesson, political scientist Felice leans toward "principled resignation" rather than working within government to change policy as the more honorable and effective response for government officials charged with prosecuting a war they thought was wrong. His scholarly backdrop cites just war theory, philosophers from Aristotle to Kant and Thoreau, and his own interview with ethicist Peter Singer, but he relies on case studies of American and British officials and soldiers who resigned, or refused to fight, to carry the argument. Through their rambling statements, the author rehashes a substantive brief against war and its justifications, and hammers home high-minded verities about ordinary citizens' duty to resist unjust wars. The book seems aimed at a limited audience that is both convinced of the war's immorality and positioned to derail, not just deplore it. Other readers may find it less than incisive. (July)Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Human Rights Quarterly
Felice's book represents a clear, committed, even passionate cry for moral integrity, particularly with respect to the public right to know in instances of war, belligerence, or states of emergency. His analysis refers to a range of philosophical approaches including realism, utilitarian consequentialism, and deontological theories of reason and right. He stresses the importance of moral obligation in all circumstances involving hierarchical command, combat, and war. His reflections on deontology and human rights, civil disobedience, and Machiavellian notions, and 'dirty hands' provide useful guideposts toward a deeper philosophical understanding of the central issues at play. . . . Felice has written a clear and well argued presentation that outlines the costs to a democratic polity for a dishonorable loyalty and the need for deliberative politics that is renewed by the honor of moral integrity expressed through principles of resignation in protest.
March 2010 Choice
This analysis makes an important contribution to the literature on international ethics, providing both a philosophical exploration of wartime moral obligations and illustrations of how individuals have sought to address incompatible moral claims. . . . Recommended.
St. Petersburg Times
We think of a soldier's honor in terms of military discipline and service to a cause. But William Felice's book How Do I Save My Honor? focuses on the times when refusing to serve might be the honorable thing to do. . . . A challenging, thoughtful look at a highly complex question.
Perspectives On Politics
Weighty and informative. . . . Among How Do I Save My Honor?’s most compelling arguments is the author’s juxtaposition of Powell’s post-Vietnam vow to resist half-baked, poorly understood, and insufficiently supported reasons for war with his role in facilitating the 2003 invasion of Iraq as secretary of state. . . . Political scientists, military professionals, and citizens would do well to discuss, debate, and reflect on the validity of Felice’s blistering critique of Powell’s distinction between 'ethical' and 'policy' reservations. . . . [A] serious book . . . [that] deserves the attention of political scientists and, especially, military professionals.
International Studies Review
Felice's analysis draws our attention to an individual-level morality—virtue and moral integrity—as opposed to concepts such as rules, rights or duties which demarcate the general structure of the moral world. Chapter 3, 'Ethical Theory and War,' articulates the limits of this world in an exposition of admirable clarity.
International Journal Of Intelligence Ethics
William F. Felice . . . makes a powerful, persuasive, and at times quite poignant case. . . . Should we wish to avoid further fiascos, we would be wise to consider Felice’s counsel to cultivate an ethic of principled resignation, one that would lower if not eliminate entirely the costs of exit and voice in our nation’s government and military, most especially during time of war.
Fall 2009 Human Rights Quarterly
Felice's book represents a clear, committed, even passionate cry for moral integrity, particularly with respect to the public right to know in instances of war, belligerence, or states of emergency. His analysis refers to a range of philosophical approaches including realism, utilitarian consequentialism, and deontological theories of reason and right. He stresses the importance of moral obligation in all circumstances involving hierarchical command, combat, and war. His reflections on deontology and human rights, civil disobedience, and Machiavellian notions, and 'dirty hands' provide useful guideposts toward a deeper philosophical understanding of the central issues at play. . . . Felice has written a clear and well argued presentation that outlines the costs to a democratic polity for a dishonorable loyalty and the need for deliberative politics that is renewed by the honor of moral integrity expressed through principles of resignation in protest.
Richard Falk
A fascinating and urgently needed exploration of moral responsibility in wartime, focusing on the complex realities and demands since 9/11. This engagingly written and well-researched study challenges each of us to honor our better selves.
Joel H. Rosenthal
Felice has written the most important moral analysis yet of the Bush-Blair years. He exposes the limits of those who argue from 'moral certainty' and recovers the deeply held democratic principle of 'loyal opposition.' I hope every young and aspiring leader will read this book and ponder its lessons.
Perspectives on Politics
Weighty and informative. . . . Among How Do I Save My Honor?’s most compelling arguments is the author’s juxtaposition of Powell’s post-Vietnam vow to resist half-baked, poorly understood, and insufficiently supported reasons for war with his role in facilitating the 2003 invasion of Iraq as secretary of state. . . . Political scientists, military professionals, and citizens would do well to discuss, debate, and reflect on the validity of Felice’s blistering critique of Powell’s distinction between 'ethical' and 'policy' reservations. . . . [A] serious book . . . [that] deserves the attention of political scientists and, especially, military professionals.
March 2010 CHOICE
This analysis makes an important contribution to the literature on international ethics, providing both a philosophical exploration of wartime moral obligations and illustrations of how individuals have sought to address incompatible moral claims. . . . Recommended.
Anthony R. Brunello
This book provides a brilliant journey through the ethical labyrinth of principled resignation in the face of political pressure, loyalty and war.
CHOICE
This analysis makes an important contribution to the literature on international ethics, providing both a philosophical exploration of wartime moral obligations and illustrations of how individuals have sought to address incompatible moral claims. . . . Recommended.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780742566682
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/16/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • File size: 305 KB

Meet the Author

William F. Felice is professor of political science at Eckerd College.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction
Chapter 1: The Moral Obligations of Civil Servants and Soldiers
Chapter 2: Ethical Theory and War
Chapter 3: Staying-In: Colin Powell and Wayne White
Chapter 4: Getting-Out: Brady Kiesling, John Brown, and Ann Wright
Chapter 5: The Ethical Soldier: Ehren Watada and Aidan Delgado
Chapter 6: Britain: Resignations from the Blair Government
Chapter 7: Individual Moral Responsibility in a Time of War
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)