How East Asians View Democracy

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Overview

East Asian Democracies are threatened by poor policy performance and undermined by nostalgia for the progrowth, soft-authoritarian regimes of the past. Yet citizens throughout the region value freedom, reject authoritarian alternatives, and believe in democracy. This book is the first to report the results of a large-scale surveys-research project, the East Asian Barometer, in which eight research teams conducted national-sample surveys in five new democracies (Korea, Taiwan, the Philippines, Thailand, and Mongolia), one established democracy (Japan), and two nondemocracies (China and Hong Kong). The findings present a definitive account of the ways in which East Asians understand their governments and their role as citizens. Contributors analyze responses from a set of core questions, revealing both common patterns and national characteristics in individual views. They contradict the claim that democratic governance is incompatible with East Asian cultures but counsel against complacency. While many forces affect democratic consolidation, popular attitudes are a crucial factor. This book shows how and why skepticism and frustration are the ruling sentiments among-today's East Asians.

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Editorial Reviews

Business Times Singapore

A fascinating study.

Foreign Affairs

This rigorously designed study... will surely become a classic in the field.

China Perspectives

A valuable but also complex book.... It is impossible, in this short review, to do justice to the richness of the data compiled and of the conclusions proposed.... Essential reading.

Journal of Chinese Political Science
the contributions to this edited volume represent a nuanced and balanced rebuttal to the view that 'Asian values' are not compatible with democracy...a very useful introduction to the topic of democracy in Asia in a course on comparative politics.

— André Laliberté

Taiwan Journal of Democracy
...provides a superb analysis of popular support for democracy in the region, and will long serve as a highly valuable resource to both regional specialists and democracy scholars.

— Stephen D. Collins

Journal of Chinese Political Science - Andre Laliberte
the contributions to this edited volume represent a nuanced and balanced rebuttal to the view that 'Asian values' are not compatible with democracy...a very useful introduction to the topic of democracy in Asia in a course on comparative politics.
Taiwan Journal of Democracy - Stephen D. Collins

...provides a superb analysis of popular support for democracy in the region, and will long serve as a highly valuable resource to both regional specialists and democracy scholars.

Journal of Chinese Political Science - André Laliberté

the contributions to this edited volume represent a nuanced and balanced rebuttal to the view that 'Asian values' are not compatible with democracy...a very useful introduction to the topic of democracy in Asia in a course on comparative politics.

East Asia - John Dunn

The whole forms an exemplary exercise in internationally comparative political science research on a provocative and elusive subject matter.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780231145350
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • Publication date: 2/12/2010
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 328
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Yun-han Chu is distinguished research fellow at the Institute of Political Science of Academia Sinica and professor of political science at National Taiwan University. The coordinator of the East Asian Barometer Survey, Chu is an associate editor of the Journal of East Asian Studies, and his recent publications include Crafting Democracy in Taiwan, China Under Jiang Zemin, and The New Chinese Leadership: Challenges and Opportunities After the Sixteenth Party Congress.

Larry Diamond is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and the founding coeditor of the Journal of Democracy. A member of USAID's Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid, Diamond has also advised and lectured to the World Bank, the United Nations, the State Department, and other governmental and nongovernmental agencies dealing with governance and development. He is the author of Squandered Victory: The American Occupation and the Bungled Effort to Bring Democracy to Iraq and Developing Democracy: Toward Consolidation.

Andrew J. Nathan is the Class of 1919 Professor of Political Science at Columbia University. He is cochair of the board, Human Rights in China, a member of the board of Freedom House, and a member of the Advisory Committee of Human Rights Watch, Asia. Nathan's authored and coedited books include China's Transition; The Tiananmen Papers; Negotiating Culture and Human Rights: Beyond Universalism and Relativism; China's New Rulers: The Secret Files; Constructing Human Rights in the Age of Globalization; and Chinese Democracy.

Doh Chull Shin holds the endowed chair in comparative politics and Korean studies at the Department of Political Science, University of Missouri. For more than ten years, Shin has directed the Korean Democracy Barometer surveys. He has also systematically monitored the cultural and institutional dynamics of democratization in Korea. Shin's latest book, Mass Politics and Culture in Democratizing Korea, has been called one of the most significant works on Asian democracies and the third wave of democratization.

Columbia University Press

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments1. Introduction: Comparative Perspectives on Democratic Legitimacy in East Asia, by Yun-han Chu, Larry Diamond, Andrew J. Nathan, and Doh Chull Shin2. The Mass Public and Democratic Politics in South Korea: Exploring the Subjective World of Democratization in Flux, by Doh Chull Shin and Chong-Min Park3. Mass Public Perceptions of Democratization in the Philippines: Consolidation in Progress?, by Linda Luz Guerrero and Rollin F. Tusalem4. How Citizens View Taiwan's New Democracy, by Yu-tzung Chang and Yun-han Chu5. Developing Democracy Under a New Constitution in Thailand, by Robert B. Albritton and Thawilwadee Bureekul6. The Mass Public and Democratic Politics in Mongolia, by Damba Ganbat, Rollin F. Tusalem, and David D. Yang7. Japanese Attitudes and Values Toward Democracy, by Ken'ichi Ikeda and Masaru Kohno8. Democratic Transition Frustrated: The Case of Hong Kong, by Wai-man Lam and Hsin-chi Kuan9. China: Democratic Values Supporting an Authoritarian System, by Tianjian Shi10. Conclusion: Values, Regime Performance, and Democratic Consolidation, by Yun-han Chu, Larry Diamond, and Andrew J. NathanAppendix 1Appendix 2Appendix 3Appendix 4Works CitedIndex

Columbia University Press

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