How Governments Privatize: The Politics of Divestment in the United States and Germany

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Overview

Governments throughout the world confront enormous challenges when divesting. Whether it is poor-performing bank loans in Japan and Korea, military bases in the United States, or real estate in eastern Europe, the challenge of public divestment is more than just a question of how to map a path to economic efficiency. Conventional wisdom in public management and privatization literature says that the execution of such enormous tasks as divestment is typically done poorly, and that the government strategy is likely to be inefficient.

Mark Cassell argues that privatization must be understood as a political and administrative puzzle rather than simply an exercise in economic efficiency. This study of two successful divestment agencies---the U.S. Resolution Trust Corporation and the German Treuhandanstalt---presents a complex understanding of the two agencies' performance in privatizing hundreds of billions of dollars of assets following two very different crises, the savings and loan debacle in the United States and unification in Germany. In the U.S., the worst economic problem since the Great Depression forced the government to recreate and reshape private property on an immense scale. In Germany, melding East and West Germany involved converting an entire national economy that employed more than four million people. In each case, unassuming public agencies handled two of the largest public sales of assets in this century.

Cassell identifies the importance and effects of managerial structures and of national institutions-legislatures and executives--on the outcomes of the reform efforts.

This book will be of interest to those interested in alternatives to traditional public-sector structures, electoral connections to bureaucracies, comparative political economy, and the historic events of the aftermath of the savings and loan crisis and German unification. It is crucial reading for policy and public administration practitioners and scholars alike.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Compares two agencies charged with the privatization of hundreds of billions of dollars of assets following two separate crises. Cassell (political science, Kent State) chronicles the Resolution Trust Corporation created to manage assets assumed after the savings and loan failure, and the Treuhandanstalt created by Germany after unification to privatize enterprises formally owned by East Germany. The study analyzes the factors that influenced the success of both programs, and how the lessons learned can be applied by other government agencies. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781589010086
  • Publisher: Georgetown University Press
  • Publication date: 4/28/2002
  • Series: American Governance and Public Policy Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.72 (d)

Meet the Author

Mark Cassell is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Kent State University.

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Table of Contents

List of Figures and Tables List of Abbreviations Preface and Acknowledgements Prologue

1. Introduction: How the Resolution Trust Corporation and the Treuhandansalt Managed the Sales of the Century

2. Bureaucratic Outputs

3. Personnel, Culture, and Organizational Structure: The Impact of Administrative Characteristics on the Performance of the RTC and THA

4. Structured Choices and Consequences 5. The Impact of Task Environment on Performance 6. The Impact of National Institutional Environments

7. Stragetic Bureaucracies and Their Consequences Appendix -- Interviews References Index

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