How I Accidentally Joined the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy: (And Found Inner Peace)

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As a journalist in an industry populated by liberals, Harry Stein carried the left-wing banner in his life and work. Then he became a father, and suddenly the Right sounded right. Even worse, the Left was starting to sound — and look — wrong.

Stein cuts through the distortions on both sides and fearlessly tackles such provocative topics as feminism, affirmative action, PC education, gay rights, and sexual McCarthyism, and shows how liberating it is to no longer have to pass as a...

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How I Accidentally Joined the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy (and Found Inner Peace)

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Overview

As a journalist in an industry populated by liberals, Harry Stein carried the left-wing banner in his life and work. Then he became a father, and suddenly the Right sounded right. Even worse, the Left was starting to sound — and look — wrong.

Stein cuts through the distortions on both sides and fearlessly tackles such provocative topics as feminism, affirmative action, PC education, gay rights, and sexual McCarthyism, and shows how liberating it is to no longer have to pass as a correct thinker. Daring, brilliantly argued, and savagely funny, How I Accidentally Joined the Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy will resonate with many who have witnessed the social revolution of the past thirty years and questioned its outcome — even if only secretly.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The journey from liberal to conservative chronicled here by Stein is a journey already described by others such as Norman Podhoretz and David Horiwitz. Though thus predictable, Stein's account is nevertheless amusing. He relates personal anecdotes about growing up, raising children and relating to friends and colleagues, but also touches on current events, culminating in the sexual transgressions of Bill Clinton. The light tone and humorous prose eventually wear thin, however, and Stein sets up a straw man in his attacks on the Left. Essentially, Stein paints himself in his liberal days as a man with ideological blinders firmly in place, and he skewers liberals in general as if they all wore the same blinders. For example, in claiming that liberal psychology undermines personal responsibility by abjuring everyone from fault for everything, he presents an extremist position. Stein himself states at one point that extremists on both ends of the ideological spectrum deny "a fair hearing to alternative views on complex social issues"-yet he is guilty of the same error. (June) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Kirkus Reviews
A right-of-center, funny, seriously iconoclastic memoir aimed at the prevailing progressivism. Journalist and novelist Stein (Infinity's Child, 1996, etc.) was raised a traditional liberal and still dislikes Pat Buchanan. Yet, after reaching fatherhood, he broke with the Hillaryism that would have consigned his offspring to an infancy of day-care followed by a multicultural curriculum bereft of dead white men's objective values—and soon found himself damned by liberal friends and their thought police as a conservative. Most of Stein's rightward shift was influenced by family life. He and his wife Priscilla didn't divorce (even though their therapist deemed it better for self-fulfillment), and Priscilla actually quit her job to raise their children. Despite all the feminist gender-bending, Stein found himself relieved to see that his children played at traditional sex roles. Stein was an early supporter of racial integration, and he takes pride in the fact that his children have black friends. He regrets that a moral giant like Dr. King (despised by radicals nowadays, along with Clarence Thomas, as an Uncle Tom) was replaced by "race hustlers," and among his satirical creations is an application for college admissions and jobs wherein one can surrender one's space for affirmative-action minorities. Stein sees the multicultural dumbing-down extending beyond curricula, to the extent that the leftist New York Times treats gangsta rap like high culture. The author's reading pile has shifted too, and he surveys the newsstand for centrist conservative values, xenophobic rightist trash, and the self-righteous leftists whose "group-think tends to promotefierceobjection to heretics." Progressive intolerance is a major theme here, as seen in Nat Hentoff's excommunication for opposing abortion and in the general attack on Tipper Gore's objection to obscene rock lyrics. All but the most humorless progressive Ayatollahs should enjoy and take some moral correction from Stein.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060936976
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 11/28/2001
  • Series: Harper Perennial Series
  • Edition description: First Perennial Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 5.31 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.68 (d)

Meet the Author

Harry Stein is the author of eight previous books. The New York Times Book Review called his recent memoir, How I Joined the Vast Right Wing Conspiracy and Found Inner Peace, "a wickedly funny and moral book." He has also written for numerous publications, including the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times Sunday Magazine, Playboy, GQ, and Esquire, for which he created the"Ethics" column. He lives in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York.

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Read an Excerpt

It's all my wife's fault.

I realize this may sound petty and, even worse, smacks of that cardinal sin of the age, a refusal to take personal responsibility.

But—what can I tell you?—she's the one who introduced me to the universe of kids.

And for me, as for so many others, that was the beginning of the end.

The beginning of the beginning was almost two years before: the spring evening in 1979 I first spotted her outside a movie screening—heart-stoppingly beautiful in a blue dress, head tilted back in laughter. At that moment, I was utterly at peace with my world. Impeccable liberal credentials in order. The old certitudes unquestioned. Lots of people who mattered in my business thought of me as a good guy, and my career was booming.

A mere couple of Super Bowls later, under her influence, I was writing stuff that was not only eliciting hate mail from strangers but alienating old friends.

How'd she do it? How'd she turn me into someone destined to be reviled in The Village Voice as "a well-known asshole"—and, even more pathetic, actually reduced to finding solace in the words "well-known"?

As a couple, we started out conventionally enough. When Priscilla arrived at an Indian restaurant on New York's Upper West Side for our first date, minus makeup and in sweater and jeans, she looked so different from the evening we'd met I was momentarily disappointed. But by the time the tandoori chicken was on the table, I was already impressed by her quirky humor and fierce critical intelligence. We were both grizzled veterans of the dating wars and before the evening's end confessed how sick we were of having to produce anentertainingversion of our checkered past for each new romantic prospect, agreeing that, for all our supposed liberation, love had surely been much more blessedly simple, and probably more thrilling, in our grandparents' day.

Yet it was a moment on our second date that left an even more enduring impression. I remember I was following Priscilla up the stairs to her apartment, and while studying the view I was telling her how many of my closest friends were women, going on about how I'd always found them easier to talk to than men because they're so much more open with their feelings, when she suddenly wheeled, flashing bemused incredulity. "That old line? Come on!"

I hesitated, momentarily defensive, then cracked up.

It's not precisely that what I was saying was untrue—I did have close women friends, and did find them easy to talk to—just that it also was a line, though I'd never thought of it in precisely those terms; one I'd slipped into conversations with new women lots of times before, always with satisfactory results.

But here was this woman ready to argue the point.

I probably should have ended it right there. This kind of contrarianism wasn't going to do me a damn bit of good—not in my circle.

Not that any of this is meant to suggest that she, any more than I, was ready yet to step off the deep end politically. A Berkeley grad, she'd done her fair share of protesting during the glory years. When we met, she had a gay male roommate, and so was much involved in the particulars of that revolution, getting regular firsthand, blow-by-blow reports from the front. ("Actually," she notes, stopping in my office, "usually it was 'blow job by blow job.' ")

And, yes, much as she was even then given to mocking feminism's more ludicrous claims and intense self-seriousness—I recall her laughing over the sisterhood's veneration of Ruffian, "the gallant little filly" who had to be destroyed after injuring herself in a match race against the despised colt Foolish Pleasure—she very much saw herself as a feminist. She was, after all, a career woman, having moved from a consulting firm to a prestigious-sounding position in the movie business—East Coast story editor for Columbia Pictures, charged with scouting out new books and plays as potential films. Far more, she was a veteran of the sexual revolution, with all the battle scars to prove it.

As, God knows, was I.



In fact, before we go any further, let's pause for what the weasels in the press like to call "full disclosure."

My wife says I include this chapter—dwelling as it does on my sexual past—only as a means of bragging. As such, she says, it registers as "pathetic."

I have considered this carefully. There is some merit in her view. I include it anyway because, as I've informed her, there is a larger point to be made, even if at my own expense: that this notion that those of us who've moved right are prudes is malicious bunk.

We loved sex in the sixties and seventies, we love it now. In fact—listening, Priscilla?—sometimes we love it even more because it's been with the same person for so long.

In any case, what follows are excerpts from the transcript of my testimony had I ever been called to appear before an independent prosecutor's grand jury.

Question: Mr. Stein, we'll begin by turning to something that has come to our attention relating to certain events that occurred in 1969.

Answer: Nineteen sixty-nine?! I was in college!

Question: Exactly. And would it be accurate to say you had a girlfriend at that time? A Ms. Jane Mallory?

Answer: I'm sorry, you would have to define the term "girl- friend."

Question: For our purposes, we will accept the definition as set forth and enumerated during your deposition. That is, one of the opposite sex whom you saw on an average of at least once weekly with the intent to arouse or gratify. (Mr. Stein consults briefly with his attorney.)

Answer: Would kissing be covered by this? And, if so, how would you define it?

Question: Mr. Stein, was it not your understanding with Ms. Mallory that yours was to be an exclusive relationship?

Answer: I have no specific recollection of that.

Question: And do you not recall meeting a certain Ms. Barbara Schoenfeld on the New York subway during Christmas break, and do you not recall accompanying her to her parents' apartment where you could be alone? Do you doubt that your girlfriend would have regarded what you did there as "cheating"?

Answer: What is your definition of "alone"?

Question: I'd like to move on if we might to the time you spent in Paris. Do you recall that period?

Answer: Paris, Texas?

Question: France, covering most of 1976 through 1978. According to testimony and documentary evidence, you were working on an English-language newspaper there.

Answer: That could be, I have no specific recollection.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2006

    neither Right nor Left

    Many people will misunderstand this title, since wit and irony are no longer learned in schools and colleges. They will interpret the title literally and buy this book, eager to hear their favorite prejudices trumpeted once again. They¿ll be disappointed. Stein is not a right-winger. True, he says of the Democratic Party: ¿Morally corrupt to the core, preaches hope and decency practices cynicism and racial and gender extortionism.¿ (p. 76) But he also says of the Republican Party: ¿Composed largely of boobs/Neanderthals/lackeys, yet also a few of real character.¿ (p. 76) The literal title for the book would be ¿How Leftist stupidity drove me out of Leftism.¿ The 1960s were a mixture of two points of view: Leftism (which was much the same as it is today: antirational, dogmatic, group-oriented, etc.) and Liberalism (which was for individual freedom, do your own thing, etc.) Most people absorbed some of both. But the two are fundamentally incompatible. For a Lefty, you do the RIGHT thing. Your own thing should BE the right thing. Only then may you do your own thing. (People are taught in school these days that THIS is Liberalism!!!) So, a strain develops within the individual person between the two conflicting ideologies. Some people abandon Liberalism (by accepting the new definition). Others abandon Leftism. Harry Stein was one of the latter. It took years of little personal experiences, but gradually he began to ask questions (and that is always the beginning of the end for both Leftism and Rightism). ¿Indeed, many of us were soon startled to find ourselves tagged conservatives (and often worse) for holding firm to the values of old-fashioned LIBERALISM: a bedrock commitment to fairness and individual liberty.¿ (p. 2) People who are beginning to have doubts about the pervasive ¿wisdom¿ they learned in school/college and on the TV/radio/rock lyrics will find this book eye-opening. People who have already liberated themselves from the pervasive ¿wisdom¿ will find comfort in these pages. Those who are hungry for more after reading this book should read ¿Who Stole Feminism?¿, ¿The Rape of Alma Mater¿, and ¿The Shadow University.¿ These are some of the better researched, more responsible books that reject the Left without the shrill fanaticism of the Right.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2003

    Incredible and Eye Opening

    Okay, I am a republican, so yes, I am bias towards this book. The In depth transformation from a liberal to a moderate (some would say hard core) is a interesting and very, very funny book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2003

    valid but dull

    Harry Stein makes some very valid points on the topic of liberal bias in the media. He presents concrete evidence charging prominent publications of this crime, including the New York Times. Although his facts are solid and his arguments pose questions in desperate need of answers, the book is not all that I expected. Stein's anecdotes and examples tend to be long winded and without focus. His points are buried beneath his attempts at creativity. It is without a doubt an informative book, but be prepared to dig through some fluff to get to the meat of his arguments.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2001

    Only pretty good

    'I never dared to be radical when young for fear it would make me conservative when old.' -- Robert Frost.<br> <br> Frost had Harry Stein's number. This account of Stein's transformation from red-diaper baby to family values crusader has its comic moments, especially a satiric take on the Lifetime cable network and an interesting Titanic-related quiz. If P.J. O'Rourke only had a heart, he'd be Stein.<br> <br> But Stein wallows in coy self-flagellation, recounting how ex-friend after ex-friend repudiated him after he changed from Left to Right. He gripes about how the Left is obsessed with victimization, yet he's superb at playing the wounded fawn. From reading Stein you'd think that conservative thinkers are living hand-to-mouth in garrets, not defining contemporary political thought at well-funded foundations. You'd conclude that Tipper Gore's anti-rock crusade fell on deaf ears, instead of leading to radical legislation and prosecution of artists. And you'd never know from this book that the <b>overwhelming</b> majority of public school sex ed since 1980 teaches abstinence.<br> <br> The book's riddled with hypocrisies. Having described an anti-feminist manifesto he once wrote with the deliberately crude title of 'Pandora's Box,' Stein has zero credibility -- zilch, nada, bupkis -- lecturing the rest of us on how lib'ral offensiveness is sending us to Hell, with Bill and Hillary leading the way. Stein's hymn to martial fidelity would resonate if he hadn't devoted a chapter to listing his premarital sex partners, and especially if he hadn't described Mrs. Stein (i.e., the mother of his two kids) as being 'very hateful.'<br> <br> My list of related titles should indicate I have no beef with critiquing the Left or humanizing the Right. We can always use more first-rate books along these lines, and there is a case to be made about how the Right was able to convert liberals of Stein's era. That case simply hasn't been made here.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2000

    Explains both sides

    As a life-long conservative, I've often accepted my beliefs without question. However, this thoughtful and fascinating book helps explain the merits of both liberalism and conservatism, while pointing out where each has gone awry. Stein, who is pro-choice, explains both sides of that issue with incredible tact, and I believe it will help foster understanding on both sides. I personally learned much about liberalism and consider myself more politically informed than before reading it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2000

    Courageous Straight Talk

    Mr. Stein could not have aided his career by publishing such a scathing rebuke of the liberal establishment. This fact makes what is already an illuminating book all the more impressive. His anecdotes are timely and his political analysis is evenhanded, although I doubt liberal readers will think so. Nevertheless, they would learn something by reading this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2000

    Insightful, critical, and necessary.

    Stein's writing is insight on major issues, providing a much needed counter balance to slant the media puts on their favorite targets. His anecdotes and verbal illustrations provided a clarity to many issues about which I felt strongly but have been unable to express personally. I don't agree with everything Stein has to say, but that fits with the main theme of the book: support thoughtful debate on important issues. That is how I found this book, part of a thoughtful debate.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2000

    Conversions..

    What a fantastic book...Happened to catch Mr.Stein being interviewed on Booknotes with Brian Lamb...Thought I would pick up the book..After reading it, I bought 3 more copies and mailed it to my liberal friends..Even from them, the response has been outstanding...They had to face the fact that they are indeed politically correct people without having given it much thought..They are now much more open to the conservative viewpoint, unlike most liberals..Thank you Mr. Stein ....

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2000

    Badge of Courage

    Former liberal journalist Harry Stein's journey from being a 70's liberal to a 90's conservative is, in reality, a study of what could be better described as a journey to the center. When Stein's book was released in June 2000, he was interviewed by Brian Lamb on C-Span's Booknotes. The interview was aired again on August 20, 2000. Stein is a fascinating person whose liberating transformation was stimulated by heavy doses of family and common sense. His book should be required reading for liberals and conservatives whose minds have not been slammed shut from radical infections. As expected, the shallow-minded liberal press and condescending book reviewers took 'offended aim' at Stein's book and spewed their all-too-familiar liberal venom at his truths. Therefore, Stein's book can easily be viewed by independent thinkers as a badge of courage and the silly, terrorist, reviews as medals of honor.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2000

    Enjoyable tale of self discovery and change

    The author details the transformation of himself and his wife from 70's liberals to 90's neoconservatives. Amusing and an enjoyable light read. Will offend the PC crowd, which is tragic as they are most in need of this type of book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2000

    It's About Time - Welcome!

    This is a funny and comical depiction of the natural tendency of all responsible men to give up the 'any goes' liberal mantra for the very intuitive, natural way that things really are. Liberals are tolerant of every diversity, except diversity of thought. I welcome you to the perceived Vast Right-Wing Conspiracy (although we don't have any meetings). An excellent book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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