How I Found Livingstone in Central Africa

How I Found Livingstone in Central Africa

by Henry M. Stanley
     
 

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American journalist and adventurer, Henry M. Stanley recounts his mission in 1871, (on behalf of the New York Herald), to find the world famous explorer David Livingstone, who was presumably lost or even killed in East Africa. In his diary Stanley writes with stoicism, and without magnifying the epic hardships of the journey, (he was deserted by his bearers, plagued

Overview

American journalist and adventurer, Henry M. Stanley recounts his mission in 1871, (on behalf of the New York Herald), to find the world famous explorer David Livingstone, who was presumably lost or even killed in East Africa. In his diary Stanley writes with stoicism, and without magnifying the epic hardships of the journey, (he was deserted by his bearers, plagued by disease and warring tribes). After travelling 700 miles in 236 days, he found the ailing Scottish missionary on the island of Ujiji on November 10, uttering his famous greeting: "Doctor Livingstone, I presume!" Together they explored the northern end of Lake Tangayika. Livingstone had journeyed extensively in central and southern Africa from 1840 and fought to destroy the slave trade. Livingstone died in 1873 on the Shores of Lake Bagweulu. His body was shipped back to England and buried in Westminster Abbey. On hearing of his hero's death, Stanley continued Livingstone's research of the region. Stanley's exploration of the region eventually led to the founding of the Congo Free State.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781455165025
Publisher:
Blackstone Audio, Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/2012
Edition description:
Unabridged
Pages:
11
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 5.30(h) x 1.30(d)

Meet the Author

Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904), was a Welsh journalist and explorer famous for his exploration of Africa and his search for David Livingstone. Stanley is often remembered for the words uttered to Livingstone upon finding him: "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?", although there is some question as to authenticity of this now famous greeting. His legacy of death and destruction in the Congo region is considered an inspiration for Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, detailing atrocities inflicted upon the natives.

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