How I Found Livingstone

How I Found Livingstone

by Henry M. Stanley
     
 

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David Livingstone was a Scottish medical missionary and explorer of Africa who, after having gone missing, was famously "found" by "American" journalist Henry Stanley, giving rise to the popular phrase, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?" Livingstone had reached cult levels of fame in Victorian England: he was a Protestant missionary "martyr", a working class "rags to…  See more details below

Overview

David Livingstone was a Scottish medical missionary and explorer of Africa who, after having gone missing, was famously "found" by "American" journalist Henry Stanley, giving rise to the popular phrase, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?" Livingstone had reached cult levels of fame in Victorian England: he was a Protestant missionary "martyr", a working class "rags to riches" persona, a scientist and explorer obsessed with mysterious source of the Nile, and an anti-slavery, imperial reformer. So by the time Stanley had gone to look for him, Livingstone had been missing for 6 years, and was presumed dead.

Stanley, who was an adventurer himself, went on said mission in 1871 on behalf of the New York Herald. He traveled 700 miles in nearly eight months, suffered diseases and tribal warfare, until he found the ill Dr. Livingstone in the town of Ujiji (a same place Richard Burton and John Speke had reached, on the shore of Tanganyika in Tanzania).

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781490967301
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
07/11/2013
Pages:
372
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.83(d)

Meet the Author

Sir Henry Morton Stanley (1841-1904), was a Welsh journalist and explorer famous for his exploration of Africa and his search for David Livingstone. Stanley is often remembered for the words uttered to Livingstone upon finding him: "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?", although there is some question as to authenticity of this now famous greeting. His legacy of death and destruction in the Congo region is considered an inspiration for Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, detailing atrocities inflicted upon the natives.

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