How Indians Use Wild Plants for Food, Medicine & Crafts

How Indians Use Wild Plants for Food, Medicine & Crafts

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by Frances Densmore
     
 

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A renowned ethnologist with the Smithsonian Institution offers a fascinating wealth of material on nearly 200 plants that were used by the Chippewas of Minnesota and Wisconsin. The volume provides an emphasis on wild plants and their lesser-known uses. "A fascinating, well-illustrated study." — Grand Rapids Gazette. 33 plates.

Overview

A renowned ethnologist with the Smithsonian Institution offers a fascinating wealth of material on nearly 200 plants that were used by the Chippewas of Minnesota and Wisconsin. The volume provides an emphasis on wild plants and their lesser-known uses. "A fascinating, well-illustrated study." — Grand Rapids Gazette. 33 plates.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780486131108
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Publication date:
03/07/2012
Series:
Native American
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
207,025
File size:
21 MB
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This product may take a few minutes to download.

Read an Excerpt

How Indians Use Wild Plants

For Food, Medicine and Crafts


By Frances Densmore

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 1974 Dover Publications, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-13110-8



INTRODUCTION

A majority of the plants to be described in this paper were obtained on the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota. Specimens were also collected on the Red Lake, Cass Lake, Leech Lake, and Mille Lac Reservations in Minnesota, the Lac Court Oreilles Reservation in Wisconsin, and the Manitou Rapids Reserve in Ontario, Canada. Many of these were duplicates of plants obtained at White Earth but others were peculiar to the locality in which they were obtained.

The White Earth Reservation is located somewhat west of north-central Minnesota, on the border of the prairie that extends westward and forms part of the Great Plains. It also contains the lakes and pine forests that characterize northern Minnesota and extend into Canada. This produces an unusual variety of vegetation, so that the Chippewa living on other reservations are accustomed to go or send to White Earth for many of their medicinal herbs. Birch trees are found in abundance, either standing in groups (pl. 28), covering a hillside, or bordering a quiet lake. There are large tracts of sugar maples and forests of pine, cedar, balsam, and spruce. (Pl. 29. ) Many of the lakes contain rice fields, and there are pretty, pebbly streams winding their way among overhanging trees. (Pl. 30.) Toward the west the prairie is dotted with little lakes or ponds, shining like mirrors. In June the air is sweet with wild roses and in midsummer the fields are beautiful with red lilies, bluebells, and a marvelous variety of color. In autumn the sumac flings its scarlet across the landscape and in winter there are miles of white, untrodden snow. The northern woodland is a beautiful country, and knowing it in all its changing seasons, one can not wonder at the poetry that is so inherent a part of Chippewa thought.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from How Indians Use Wild Plants by Frances Densmore. Copyright © 1974 Dover Publications, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
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How Indians Use Wild Plants for Food, Medicine and Crafts 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
northcountry More than 1 year ago
If you are interested in the culture of the Ojibwe Indians in the early 1920, this is a fabulous resource. Thoroughly documented, well written, and a fascinating look into an earlier time and an old, very noble culture. The Nook conversion has some typographical errors, but I could easily figure out what was intended. Altogether, a worthy addition to the library of anyone interested in wild foods, American Indian culture, and life in the early 20th century.