How Jackrabbit Got His Very Long Ears

How Jackrabbit Got His Very Long Ears

by Heather Irbinskas, Kenneth J. Spengler
     
 

Because he doesn't listen carefully to what the Great Spirit tells him about each of the animals he is supposed to lead to their desert homes, Jackrabbit causes much unhappiness with his careless answers to the animals' questions.See more details below

  • Checkmark Kids' Club Eligible  Shop Now

Overview

Because he doesn't listen carefully to what the Great Spirit tells him about each of the animals he is supposed to lead to their desert homes, Jackrabbit causes much unhappiness with his careless answers to the animals' questions.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Irbinskas's first picture book, a Southwestern ``just so'' approach to the traits of several desert animals, seems dated: the lessons are spelled out, the story is surpriseless and the overblown, poster-like illustrations show ``real'' animals with human expressions and feelings. A benevolent, bearded, cloud-figure Great Spirit lends an ersatz Native American tone, altogether false to the regional Native religious sense of a pervasive animistic spirit. Following a lengthy cosmogony, Great Spirit creates Jackrabbit to lead other new animals to their homes. Predictably, Jackrabbit doesn't listen up and delivers erroneous, negative messages to Tortoise, Bobcat and Roadrunner (the latter, for example, is told that he doesn't have wings like an eagle's because he's a less important creature). Great Spirit steps in to point out to each animal the survival value of his perceived shortcoming, then kindly supplies Jackrabbit with longer ears. The author intrudes at the end to say that ``if you try to sneak up on a jackrabbit, you'll find he has very good hearing indeed!'' Ages 5-up. (May)
Carolyn Phelan
When the Great Spirit creates the desert and the creatures who will live there, he designates the jackrabbit to guide the animals to their new homes and explain their special adaptations, which make them well suited to their environment. The flightly rabbit doesn't listen well, though, and when Tortoise asks why he's so slow, Jackrabbit hems and haws and finally makes up a disconcerting answer: "Because you're not as smart as I am." He also saddens Roadrunner and Bobcat with his fabricated answers to their questions, until the Great Spirit realizes what's happening and gives Jackrabbit a new adaptation of his own: big ears to help him listen better to what he's told. This original "pourquoi" story has the flavor of a folktale and reads aloud well. Full of energy and strong on characterization, the lively paintings will project the story back to the last row of the classroom or story hour.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780873585668
Publisher:
Cooper Square Publishing Llc
Publication date:
05/28/1999
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
708,991
Product dimensions:
8.91(w) x 11.48(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 17 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >