How Many Ways Can You Catch a Fly?
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How Many Ways Can You Catch a Fly?

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by Robin Page
     
 

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Flies are fast! They can hover, walk upside down, and use their lightning-quick reflexes to escape predators. But rainbow trout, slender lorises, and assassin bugs can catch them. Chimney swifts can, too. How do such diverse creatures manage to capture the same prey? Similar in structure to What Do You Do with a Tail Like This?, this eye-popping picture book

Overview

Flies are fast! They can hover, walk upside down, and use their lightning-quick reflexes to escape predators. But rainbow trout, slender lorises, and assassin bugs can catch them. Chimney swifts can, too. How do such diverse creatures manage to capture the same prey? Similar in structure to What Do You Do with a Tail Like This?, this eye-popping picture book introduces readers to a menagerie of animals that approach the same challenges in very different ways.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"An enthralling read-aloud, especially in small groups, where children can crowd up close to the images." 9/1/08 Booklist, ALA, Starred Review

“[A] stunning creation…with an engaging text that's wonderful for both group reading or sharing one-on-one." Kirkus Reviews

"This is good science, organized and illustrated for joyful learning." School Library Journal, Starred

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
"All animals must find or catch food to stay alive." They also have to avoid being eaten, and may need to form shelters or nests. For each of a series of questions on how a variety of creatures solve these problems, Jenkins and Page offer a double page of the answers or solutions. The many ways of snaring a fish, hatching an egg, using a leaf, catching a fly, digging a hole, and eating a clam are all clearly explained and shown. The illustrators find the perfect papers to create realistic creatures from cut and torn paper collages. The esthetically designed pages present the factual information accessibly in both word and image. While the overall effect of each double-page spread is attractive, it is the allure of the details that hold the attention for repeated examination. The question is posed on one side of a double page, with a small parade of the involved creatures across the bottom. The visual and verbal answers on the next spread appear against the white pages. There are four pages of additional information about all the subjects, along with a bibliography. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

Gr 1-5

In this new take on animal adaptation, readers are asked to guess how six different animals might hatch an egg, use a leaf, eat a clam, or dig a hole. They can then turn the page to see how the creatures, ranging from the well-known grizzly bear to the unusual white tent bat, pull off the task. Jenkins and Page have done a remarkable job of selecting animals with unique adaptations and organizing them into categories for the gamelike feel of the book. The explanations in the body of the book and in the more detailed end matter are clear and engaging. Jenkins's beguiling slender loris on the cover, with its torn-paper fur and uncannily realistic eyes, draws readers into a menagerie of detailed paper art. This is good science, organized and illustrated for joyful learning.-Ellen Heath, Easton Area Public Library, Easton, PA

Kirkus Reviews
Similar in format to their highly successful What Do You Do With a Tail Like This? (2003), this stunning creation combines Jenkins's gorgeous hand-made paper illustrations with an engaging text that's wonderful for both group reading or sharing one-on-one. "See if you can figure out how the animals in these pages will snare a fish, hatch an egg, use a leaf, catch a fly, dig a hole, or eat a clam," the introduction encourages. Openings show small images of six animals opposite large images of a fly, leaf, etc., challenging the reader to answer the question before turning the page to see the illustrated answers. The eye-appealing arrangement of words and images makes each page turn a delight. The facts are fascinating and sometimes a tad gruesome: "The ichneumon wasp...lays its eggs inside a caterpillar. When the eggs hatch, the wasp larvae eat the caterpillar from the inside out." Nature is "red in tooth and claw." More information about each of the animals is contained in the back of the book. Kudos! (Informational picture book. 5-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618966349
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
10/06/2008
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,296,133
Product dimensions:
10.30(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
NC1060L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Robin Page lives in Boulder, Colorado, with her husband and collaborator, Steve Jenkins, and their three children. Along with writing and illustrating children’s books, Steve and Robin run a graphic design studio.

Steve Jenkins has written and illustrated many nonfiction picture books for young readers, including the Caldecott Honor-winning What Do You Do with a Tail Like This? His books have been called stunning, eye-popping, inventive, gorgeous, masterful, extraordinary, playful, irresistible, compelling, engaging, accessible, glorious, and informative. He lives in Boulder, Colorado with his wife and frequent collaborator, Robin Page, and their children.

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How Many Ways Can You Catch a Fly? 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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