How Networks Work / Edition 7

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Overview

Ever wonder how your office computer network works? Or how the Ethernet card inside your computer connects you to that network or to the Internet? How Networks Work will give you a thorough, detailed explanation of the inner-workings of network systems without getting you caught up in network jargon. Learn the basic principles of networking and how those principles work inside pieces of network equipment. Complete with illustrations to show how things work together, this latest edition also includes information on the newest technologies, including VoIP, wireless networks, broadband and more.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780789732323
  • Publisher: Que
  • Publication date: 8/20/2004
  • Series: How It Works Series
  • Edition number: 7
  • Pages: 233
  • Sales rank: 381,124
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 10.08 (h) x 0.46 (d)

Meet the Author

Frank Derfler and Les Freed are a proven networking best-selling combination. In addition to authoring the wildly successful How Networks Work, Fourth Edition, Millennium Edition and Sixth Editions they also wrote Get a Grip on Network Cabling, a success for Ziff Davis Press and still being used in many college and technical school classrooms as the course book for cabling classes. Frank is a Senior Networking Editor and Les is a Contributing Editor at PC Magazine, where they review the latest networking products and technology for the world's largest computer magazine.

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Table of Contents

Introduction.

I. Communicating by Wire.

1. How Telegraphs Work.

2. How Telephones Work.

II. Mixing Computers and Telephones.

3. How Early Networks Worked.

4. How Early Communications Terminals Worked.

5. Alphabet Soup: Morse, Baudot, ASCII, and EBCDIC.

6. How Modems Work.

7. How Terminals Work.

8. How Serial Communications Works.

9. The PC As a Terminal.

10. How Broadband Works.

11. How Computer Telephony Integration Works.

III. Local Area Networks (LANs).

12. How Local Area Networks Work.

13. How Networking Operating Systems Work.

14. How Network Interface Cards Work.

15. How Network Cables Works.

16. How IP Works.

17. How Server-Based LANs Work.

18. How Peer-to-Peer Networks Work.

19. How Enterprise Network Systems Work.

20. How LAN-to-LAN Connections Work.

IV. Links Between LANs.

21. How Bridges, Routers, and Switches Work.

22. How Metropolitan Area Networks Work.

23. How Circuit-Switched Digital Networks Work.

24. How Packet-Switched Networks Work.

V. The Internet.

25. How Internet Connections Work.

26. Network Security.

VI. Networks for e-Business.

27. e-Business Infrastructure.

VII. Intertainment.

28. Convergence and Telematics.

Index.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2004

    nice VOIP and p2p explanations

    The Internet is a special kind of computer network, though by now the most important. But have you ever puzzled at the innards of it or any other network? The problem is that most explanatory texts are aimed at the computer professional. And indeed, often for someone planning to specialise in writing applications to run on that network. Derfler and Freed write for a different and far broader audience. They do not assume that you are a professional programmer, or plan to become one. So the jargon is not as impenetratable as in other texts. Plus, a distinguishing feature of this book is the skillful and generous use of diagrams, to illustrate ideas in the text. Takes a lot of the abstraction out of the problem of learning the material. Furthermore, this edition contains explanations of 2 very hot topics. Voice over IP, which gives the potential of cheap (free?) phone calls. And peer-to-peer networks. For the latter, two cases are covered - with a central server, and without. Refreshingly, the example usages are not of copying music or video. To show that, yes, there are good usages of p2p networks.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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