How Prudence Proovit Proved The Truth About Fairy Tales

How Prudence Proovit Proved The Truth About Fairy Tales

by Coleen Murtagh Paratore, Tamara Petrosino
     
 

Dear grumps, hotshots, and children too old or smart to believe in fairy tales,

I used to be just like you.

That is, until the day some friends of mine got together.

Goldie, Snow, and the others, well, they've shown me there's more to fairy tales than red hoods and glass slippers.

Trust me, this isn't a spell; you'll learn the truth too

if you keep reading.

…  See more details below

Overview

Dear grumps, hotshots, and children too old or smart to believe in fairy tales,

I used to be just like you.

That is, until the day some friends of mine got together.

Goldie, Snow, and the others, well, they've shown me there's more to fairy tales than red hoods and glass slippers.

Trust me, this isn't a spell; you'll learn the truth too

if you keep reading.

Sincerely,

Prudence Proovit

Ambassador to Fairy Tale Forest

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
Rational thinking makes a girl unpopular and whimsy wins her friends: so suggests this tale, which does a disservice to logic and literature both. Prudence Proovit has a know-it-all name, strict professors for parents and three secret wishes for "curly hair, a dollhouse, and most of all, a sister." At school, Prudence prefers science to Snow White, and asks bratty but reasonable questions about Goldilocks ("The original dumb blonde?") and Red Riding Hood ("Couldn't that girl tell a woman from a wolf?"). Meanwhile, she receives mysterious postcards: "Dear Prude, Lighten up.... It helps to let down your hair. `R.' " In the end, the cards' "Fairy Tale Forest" postmarks satisfy Prudence that "Fairy tales must be true," freeing her imagination and allowing her wishes to be granted. Petrosino (Rocky: The Cat Who Barked) draws kicky cartoons in a curvy black-ink line. Prudence is the only kid wearing owlish glasses and an uptight vest-and-tie uniform, and her frowning classmates keep their distance until her transformation into a true believer. Paratore, making her debut, styles Prudence as a surly nonconformist who wants hard evidence before she accepts anything. "It's good to think. And to wish," Prudence's teacher says, yet the sour message implies that Prudence should ask fewer questions if she wants real happiness. Ages 4-8. (June) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-Young Prudence doesn't believe in fairy tales. "If Prudence Proovit couldn't prove it, well, it just wasn't so." Her professor parents prefer to fill her head with facts and actively campaign against these stories, so she is dismayed to discover that her teacher, Miss Bliss, and classmates love fairy tales. Prudence begins her own campaign against them, nastily muttering, "Who's the original dumb blonde? Did you guess Goldilocks?" and sporting a sash that reads: "Ban Grimm and Aesop." Miss Bliss encourages her to believe in these stories because then her wishes will come true. Eventually, the teacher reveals her true identity (she is Cinderella's Fairy Godmother) and Prudence finally sees the light. Now that she believes, two wishes that she had made before-for curly hair and a baby sister-are granted. She even finds a way to "prove" to everyone else that the stories are real. The plot is convoluted, contrived, and confusing. The premise seems to be that pursuing science and enjoying fairy tales are mutually exclusive, and that believing in them will bring about unrelated changes in personal circumstances. Petrosino's cartoon illustrations are bright and cheerful, but in the end are as forgettable as the illogical, flawed story line.-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Paratore's tale of a skeptical child who learns to believe founders on art from an illustrator who doesn't seem to have read it. Raised to trust only in the empirical method, young Prudence pooh-poohs the folk tales her new teacher, "Miss Beatrix Bliss, F.G." reads in class, as well as the admonitory notes and postcards she keeps receiving from the likes of "L.R. Hood," and "Big B.W. and the Oinks." Once she realizes that she's alienated her friends, though, she changes her tune, proclaiming that fairy tales are real. Her proof? The "Fairy Tale Forest" postmarks on her mail-but in Petrosino's cartoon scenes, those cards are plainly visible, and plainly have no postmarks (or mailing addresses, for that matter) at all. Prudence may believe, but readers won't. (Picture book. 6-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689862748
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
Publication date:
06/01/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.86(w) x 11.08(h) x 0.41(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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