How Raven Stole the Sun

Overview


A long time ago, Raven was pure white, like fresh snow in winter. This was so long ago that the only light came from campfires, because a greedy chief kept the stars, moon, and sun locked up in elaborately carved boxes. Determined to free them, the shape-shifting Raven resourcefully transformed himself into the chief's baby grandson and cleverly tricked him into opening the boxes and releasing the starlight and moonlight. Though tired of being stuck in human form, Raven maintained his disguise until he got the ...
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Overview


A long time ago, Raven was pure white, like fresh snow in winter. This was so long ago that the only light came from campfires, because a greedy chief kept the stars, moon, and sun locked up in elaborately carved boxes. Determined to free them, the shape-shifting Raven resourcefully transformed himself into the chief's baby grandson and cleverly tricked him into opening the boxes and releasing the starlight and moonlight. Though tired of being stuck in human form, Raven maintained his disguise until he got the chief to open the box with the sun and flood the world with daylight, at which point he gleefully transformed himself back into a raven. When the furious chief locked him in the house, Raven was forced to escape through the small smokehole at the top — and that's why ravens are now black as smoke instead of white as snow.
This engaging Tlingit story is brought to life in painterly illustrations that convey a sense of the traditional life of the Northwest Coast peoples.
About the Tales of the People series:
Created with the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI), Tales of the People is a series of children's books celebrating Native American culture with illustrations and stories by Indian artists and writers. In addition to the tales themselves, each book also offers four pages filled with information and photographs exploring various aspects of Native culture, including a glossary of words in different Indian languages.
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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
In this traditional Tlingit tale, Raven tries to liberate the sun, moon and stars from a greedy chief who keeps them locked away in beautifully carved boxes. Unable to get into the chief's house, Raven spies the chief's daughter drinking water from a creek, changes himself into a pine needle, flows into her cup and is ingested. Several months later, she gives birth to a son who is really Raven in disguise. The chief, an indulgent grandfather, lets his grandson play with the beautifully carved boxes. One by one, Raven sets the celestial bodies free. His job done, Raven shape-shifts back into a white bird. The chief, furious that he's been tricked, tries to trap him. But Raven escapes through a smokehole in the ceiling and is blackened forever. Information about the Tlingit people, a glossary of Tlingit words, and a profile of the raven in Northwest Coast historical legend complement the beautifully illustrated text. This is one of the "Tales of the People" series created with the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. 2001, Abbeville Press, $14.95. Ages 8 to 12. Reviewer:Ellen R. Braaf
From The Critics
How Raven Stole The Sun is the latest addition to the Abbeville "Tales of the People" series of books for young readers, published in partnership with the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. Felix Vigil's artwork is perfectly suited to Maria Williams retelling of a Tinglit tale she first heard from her father. Its the story of how the Raven transformed himself to bring light to what had been an earth shrouded in darkness. How Raven Stole The Sun is further enriched for young readers with a glossary of Tinglit Words, a brief description of the Tinglit People; and photographs of artifacts drawn from the Smithsonian collection, as well as period photos of the Tlingit people. Other highly recommended titles in this outstanding series include The Butterfly Dance (0789201615, $14.95); Brave Wolf And The Thunderbird (0789201607, $14.95); and Coyote In Love With A Star (0789201623, $14.95).
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780789201638
  • Publisher: Abbeville Press, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/28/2001
  • Series: Tales of the People Series
  • Pages: 29
  • Sales rank: 535,624
  • Age range: 6 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.53 (w) x 9.54 (h) x 0.43 (d)

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