Progress in Self Psychology, V. 16: How Responsive Should We Be? [NOOK Book]

Overview

Volume 16 of Progress in Self Psychology, How Responsive Should We Be, illuminates the continuing tension between Kohut's emphasis on the patient's subjective experience and the post-Kohutian intersubjectivists' concern with the therapist's own subjectivity by focusing on issues of therapeutic posture and degree of therapist activity. Teicholz provides an integrative context for examining this tension by discussing affect as the common denominator underlying the analyst's empathy, subjectivity, and authenticity. ...

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Progress in Self Psychology, V. 16: How Responsive Should We Be?

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Overview

Volume 16 of Progress in Self Psychology, How Responsive Should We Be, illuminates the continuing tension between Kohut's emphasis on the patient's subjective experience and the post-Kohutian intersubjectivists' concern with the therapist's own subjectivity by focusing on issues of therapeutic posture and degree of therapist activity. Teicholz provides an integrative context for examining this tension by discussing affect as the common denominator underlying the analyst's empathy, subjectivity, and authenticity. Responses to the tension encompass the stance of intersubjective contextualism, advocacy of "active responsiveness," and emphasis on the thorough-going bidirectionality of the analytic endeavor. Balancing these perspectives are a reprise on Kohut's concept of prolonged empathic immersion and a recasting of the issue of closeness and distance in the analytic relationship in terms of analysis of "the tie to the negative selfobject." Additional clinical contributions examine severe bulimia and suicidal rage as attempts at self-state regulation and address the self-reparative functions that inhere in the act of dreaming. Like previous volumes in the series, volume 16 demonstrates the applicability of self psychology to nonanalytic treatment modalities and clinical populations. Here, self psychology is brought to bear on psychotherapy with placed children, on work with adults with nonverbal learning disabilities, and on brief therapy. Rector's examination of twinship and religious experience, Hagman's elucidation of the creative process, and Siegel and Topel's experiment with supervision via the internet exemplify the ever-expanding explanatory range of self-psychological insights.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781134904334
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 6/17/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 408
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Arnold Goldberg, M.D., is the Cynthia Oudejan Harris, M.D. Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Rush Medical College in Chicago, and Training and Supervising Analyst, Institute for Psychoanalysis, Chicago. He is the author of a number of books, including Being of Two Minds: The Vertical Split in Psychoanalysis (TAP, 1999) and Errant Selves: A Casebook of Misbehavior (TAP, 2000).

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Table of Contents

I. Introduction - Jill Gardner
II. From the Kohut Archives - Charles Strozier
III. Theoretical
Forms of Relatedness: Self Preservation and the Schizoid Continuum - Mark J. Gehrie
The Analyst's Empathy, Subjectivity and Authenticity: Affect as the Common Denominator - Judith Guss Teicholz
The Active Exploratory and Assertive Self as Manifested in Dreams - James M. Fisch
The Development of the Dyad: A Bidrectional Revisioning of Some - Lynn Preston & Ellen Shumsky
IV. Clinical
The Need for Efficacy in The treatment of Suicidal Patients - Hans-Peter Hartmann & Wolfgang E. Milch
Supervision: Something New Under the Sun - Allen M. Siegel & Eva-Maria Topel
Bulimia as Metaphor: Twinship and Play in the Treatment of the Difficult Patient - James E. Gorney
Reflections on Selfobject Transferences and a Continuum of Responsiveness - Louisa R. Livingston
Easy Listening, Prolonged Empathic Immersion, and the Selfobject Needs of the Analyst - Jeffrey L. Mermelstein
Dimensions of Experience in Relationship Seeking - Mary E. Connors
V. Applied
Using Self Psychology in Brief Psychotherapy - Jill R. Garder
Discussion of Jill Gardner's Paper - Linda A. Chernus
Developmental Aspects of the Twinship Selfobject Need and Religious Experience - Lallene J. Rector
The Creative Process - George Hagman
Restoration of the Past: A Guide to Therapy With Placed Children - Marilyn W. Silin

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