How Santa Lost His Job

Overview

Santa has the best job he can think of — brining presents each Christmas to children all around the world. Every year he prepares for his trip: He trims his beard, takes a bath, gets dressed, and packs up his sleigh fort he long night ahead. But there are always a few unexpected delays that make things a little hectic. Muckle, one of the elves who helps Santa, thinks he can come up with a more efficient way of delivering the toys — a method that won't involve Santa at all.

...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (40) from $1.99   
  • New (11) from $2.87   
  • Used (29) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Santa has the best job he can think of — brining presents each Christmas to children all around the world. Every year he prepares for his trip: He trims his beard, takes a bath, gets dressed, and packs up his sleigh fort he long night ahead. But there are always a few unexpected delays that make things a little hectic. Muckle, one of the elves who helps Santa, thinks he can come up with a more efficient way of delivering the toys — a method that won't involve Santa at all.

Frustrated by Santa's slowness at Christmastime, Muckle the elf creates a mechanical replacement called the Deliverator and proposes a series of contests to prove that it can do Santa's job better than he can.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
School Library Journal, starred review [Krensky's] text and Schindler's wonderfully energetic illustrations depict the elusive qualities that make Santa the best choice [for the job].
Publishers Weekly
In How Santa Lost His Job by Stephen Krensky, illus. by S.D. Schindler, downsizing hits the North Pole when the elves vote to sack Santa in the name of efficiency. Clever, humorous details abound in Schindler's pen-and-ink art (the elves upgrade to computer ordering; reindeer help Santa clean house). A fitting follow-up to How Santa Got His Job. (Oct.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
The preposterous notion of the title coupled with an elf scraping Santa's name off the window right on the cover should be enough to bring this book off the shelf repeatedly. Young readers won't be disappointed¾there are nice elves and mean ones, a bit of suspense, a few races and contests, and a happy ending. It all begins when the elves become frustrated with Santa's slow, disorganized style. Muckle the elf creates a "Deliverator," the high tech answer to putting Santa out of a job. Deliverator wins all the contests with Santa hands down¾matching the most children with gifts, getting ready to go on Christmas Eve, dealing with cookies before heading back up the chimney. But then what does Deliverator do when it's not programmed to handle those few last minute packages or avoid the storm clouds up ahead? It spins around in circles and delivers nothing but a chance to Santa to get back on the job. The 19th century cartoon style illustrations are brightly detailed and surrounded by drafting paper filled with sketches of machines to speed up holiday gift-giving. In the end, "nobody talked of replacing Santa again...new delays and mix-ups...(were) all perfectly normal." 2001, Simon & Schuster, $15.00 Ages 4 to 8. Reviewer: Karen Leggett
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-In this companion to Krensky's How Santa Got His Job (S & S, 1998), St. Nick faces a common work dilemma-the automation of his job responsibilities. When the elves grumble about his inefficiency, nerdy Muckle invents the Deliverator, a robotic replacement for Santa. The old man protests, "There's more to my job than meets the eye," but allows the elves to judge for themselves-man versus the machine. Subsequent text and Schindler's wonderfully energetic and detailed illustrations depict the elusive qualities that make Santa the best choice. When the Deliverator malfunctions and crashes on Christmas Eve, the jolly man graciously and with the utmost professionalism resumes his duties. "After that, nobody talked of replacing Santa again. Each year there were new delays or mix-ups. But the elves didn't mind. They realized now that this was all perfectly normal." Even libraries that don't own How Santa Got His Job will want to purchase this title, both for holiday enjoyment and for classroom use.-L. F. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Assembly-line workers are being replaced by machines-but Santa? That's just what Muckle the elf has in mind. Annoyed at Santa's last-minute changes and the inefficiency of the whole setup, he decides there must be a better way. Behind the text boxes, readers can see the incredibly detailed blueprints for Muckle's wondrous new machine, the Deliverator. In lighting speed it matches children's letters with a gift. It can travel around the world in one night, and zip up and down chimneys to make deliveries. But Clara, the mail carrier, has her doubts that the Deliverator can do everything that Santa does. After all, who will eat the milk and cookies, and who really knows the children as well as Santa? Predictably, a glitch causes the Deliverator to fail-and during the most hectic year of all. But the uncomplaining elves have learned that Christmas is not about a schedule, rather about caring, something that can't be programmed into a computer. And Santa makes a couple of changes of his own: the elves now track orders from a bank of computers in the workroom. However, his other major change-marriage to Mrs. Claus at the finale-seems not to fit in with the flow of the story. Krensky (Shooting for the Moon, p. 802, etc.) has crafted a tale with an obvious lesson, but somehow this does not detract. Rather, it highlights the importance of personal attention and the "little things" in the celebration of Christmas. This is a wonderful complement to Krensky's first Santa book, How Santa Got His Job (1998), which documents the job experiences and skills that make him perfect for the position. Schindler's (The Cod's Tale, p. 1294, etc.) drawings are masterworks of detail, from the reindeer snitchingcookies in Santa's kitchen, to the steam coming from Muckle's head as he has to reprogram the Deliverator. Keep on truckin', Santa. (Picture book. 4-7)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689871474
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
  • Publication date: 10/5/2004
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 793,028
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.32 (w) x 7.76 (h) x 0.13 (d)

Meet the Author

Stephen Krensky is the author of more than a hundred books for children, including How Santa Got His Job (an ALA Notable Book) and Big Bad Wolves at School. He and his wife, Joan, live in Lexington, Massachusetts. You can visit him at StephenKrensky.com.

S. D. Schindler is the popular and versatile illustrator of many books for children, including Big Pumpkin and the ALA Notable Book Don't Fidget a Feather, both by Erica Silverman, How Santa Got His Job by Stephen Krensky, and Johnny Appleseed by Rosemary and Stephen Vincent Benét. He lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)