How the Camel Got His Hump

How the Camel Got His Hump

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by Rudyard Kipling, Amanda Hall
     
 

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Once upon a time, when the world was "new-and-all," Man turned to the animals for help—to the horse for carrying, the dog for fetching, the ox for plowing. But the camel refused to do a lick of work, haughtily replying "Humpf!" to all requests. The other animals complained of the inequity to the Djinn of all the Deserts, who used his powerful magic to punish

Overview

Once upon a time, when the world was "new-and-all," Man turned to the animals for help—to the horse for carrying, the dog for fetching, the ox for plowing. But the camel refused to do a lick of work, haughtily replying "Humpf!" to all requests. The other animals complained of the inequity to the Djinn of all the Deserts, who used his powerful magic to punish the lazy camel.
Rudyard Kipling's beloved story of how the camel got his hump is a comical tale of justice delivered that's filled with fanciful wordplay and illustrated with wit and great charm by the incomparable Lisbeth Zwerger.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Lisbeth Zwerger breathes new life into a tale from Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories, How the Camel Got His Hump. With scenes framed in a white border, Zwerger's earth-toned paintings convey the dryness of the desert in which the story takes place; patterned scarves, maps and floral friezes rest beneath, while elements from the narrative appear as spot art. (Sept.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
This new version of Kipling's time-honored classic is highlighted by lively, colorful illustrations. When the world was new and smaller than it is now, Man got help from the animals with all the work that needed to be done. All except for Camel. When Horse or Dog or Ox asked Camel to pitch in, all Camel would say is, "Humph." In the end, the wise Djinn gave Camel his comeuppance, and caused Camel's "humph" to turn into his hump. That is why today Camel can work for three days without stopping, relying on the energy stored in its hump. 2001, North-South Books, $15.95 and $15.88. Ages 5 to 8. Reviewer: Christopher Moning<%ISBN%>0735814821
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-Kipling's classic story of the fitting punishment dealt to the uncooperative camel is interpreted by Zwerger in a rather austere manner. Each spread has text and a few small symbols or designs on the left side and an illustration framed with white space and a few more designs on the right. While the pictures display the artist's graphic skill, they seem somewhat removed and lacking in child appeal. The lazy, humpless camel is marvelously conceited and disdainful and the dog is nicely eager, but the other animals and the Djinn are given little personality, are often quite distant, and do not really engage the eye. The Djinn, who is described as "rolling in a cloud of dust," is pictured as rolling in what looks like a large bandage or sheet. The two pages in which Kipling describes his own illustrations (of the Djinn making magic and guiding it with his fan), normally not part of the story but included after it, appear here before the camel sees his hump. This breaks up the narrative flow. Librarians in need of a single-volume version of this story will find this an acceptable purchase but those holding versions such as the one illustrated by Quentin Blake (Peter Bedrick, 1985; o.p.) can pass on it.-Louise L. Sherman, formerly at Anna C. Scott School, Leonia, NJ Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781857932423
Publisher:
Anova Books
Publication date:
07/01/1995
Series:
Just so Stories Series
Pages:
32
Age Range:
9 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Rudyard Kipling(1865-1936), recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1907, was an English novelist, short-story writer, and poet. His sweeping tales of adventure, including "Kim, Captains Courageous, " and "The jungle Book", won him wide popularity during his lifetime and have been beloved by generations.

Lisbeth Zwerger was born in Vienna, where she later studied at the Academy of Art. Internationally renowned as one of the finest contemporary illustrators of children's literature, Zwerger chose "The Gift of the Magi" as the first American story she illustrated.

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How the Camel Got His Hump 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Now we know why camels are so grumpy, they don't like to work much. Great story that had my kids being rather helpful around the house.