How the Hippies Saved Physics: Science, Counterculture, and the Quantum Revival

How the Hippies Saved Physics: Science, Counterculture, and the Quantum Revival

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by David Kaiser
     
 

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“Meticulously researched and unapologetically romantic, How the Hippies Saved Physics makes the history of science fun again.”—Science

In the 1970s, an eccentric group of physicists in Berkeley, California, banded together to explore the wilder side of science. Dubbing themselves the “Fundamental Fysiks Group,”

Overview

“Meticulously researched and unapologetically romantic, How the Hippies Saved Physics makes the history of science fun again.”—Science

In the 1970s, an eccentric group of physicists in Berkeley, California, banded together to explore the wilder side of science. Dubbing themselves the “Fundamental Fysiks Group,” they pursued an audacious, speculative approach to physics, studying quantum entanglement in terms of Eastern mysticism and psychic mind reading. As David Kaiser reveals, these unlikely heroes spun modern physics in a new direction, forcing mainstream physicists to pay attention to the strange but exciting underpinnings of quantum theory.

Editorial Reviews

Wall Street Journal
“It’s rare to find quantum physics mentioned in the same breath with sex, drugs and rock ’n’ roll. . . . I heartily enjoyed How the Hippies Saved Physics.”
Nature
“It is hard to write a book about quantum mechanics that is at once intellectually serious and a page-turner. But David Kaiser succeeds. . . . Illuminating.”
Christian Science Monitor
“[Kaiser] does an admirable job of making the very concepts of quantum mechanics palpable.”
Philadelphia Inquirer
“An entertaining tale.”
Science
Meticulously researched and unapologetically romantic, How the Hippies Saved Physics makes the history of science fun again.— Matthew Wisnioski
Fred Turner
“How the Hippies Saved Physics takes readers on a mind-bending trip to the far horizons of science—a place where the counterculture’s search for a New Age of consciousness opened the door to a new era in physics. Who knew that the discipline that brought us the atom bomb had also glimpsed Utopia? Amazing.”
Hugh Gusterson - Nature
“It is hard to write a book about quantum mechanics that is at once intellectually serious and a page-turner. But David Kaiser succeeds in his account of a neglected but important group of physicists who brought together quantum mechanics, Eastern religion, parapsychology and the hallucinogen LSD. … Illuminating.”
Choice
“This entertaining, worthwhile read is as much about the nature of society at the dawn of the New Age as it is about quantum physics.”
Matthew Wisnioski - Science
“Meticulously researched and unapologetically romantic, How the Hippies Saved Physics makes the history of science fun again.”
Booklist
“Starred Review. Science has never been more unpredictable—or more entertaining!”
American Scientist
“Exhaustively and carefully researched. [Kaiser] has uncovered a wealth of revealing detail about the physicists involved, making for a very lively tale. … Fascinating.”
Sacramento News & Review
“Kaiser’s style is engaging, which makes this history of the time when physics left the short-sleeved white shirts, skinny ties and plastic pocket protectors behind one of the best science books of the year.”
Library Journal
Most laypersons view scientific research either as a series of eureka moments or an evenly spaced staircase of discoveries. In fact, neither view is accurate. Each scientific field has periods of great discovery and rapid expansion (organic chemistry in the 1800s, classical genetics in the early 1900s), periods of consolidation (early 17th-century medicine), and stagnation. In the 1970s, physics was in a period of retrenchment. When a talented group of physicists began meeting to exchange ideas, their shared thoughts and speculations brought about a physics renaissance. This is the story of their mental explorations. Sean Runnette, a highly capable reader, does a good job with sometimes difficult concepts. Highly recommended for anyone interested in the history of science or ideas. [For a less laudatory take on this title, read the review of the Norton hc, LJ 4/15/11.—Ed.]—I. Pour-El, Des Moines Area Community Coll., Boone, IA
Kirkus Reviews

An enthusiastic account of a coterie of physicists who, during the 1970s, embraced New Age fads and sometimes went on to make dramatic discoveries.

In his first book, Kaiser (Physics/MIT) paints a gloomy portrait of his field during that decade. The golden age of Einstein, Bohr, Heisenberg, Pauli et al was history. The Cold War and increased government support had vastly increased the number of physicists, including many who yearned to explore Einstein-style paradoxes and the nature of reality but were bored by classes which stressed mundane practical applications. In 1975, Berkeley graduate students took matters into their own hands, organizing an informal "Fundamental Fysiks Group." They attracted like-minded hip doctorates, so discussions mixed quantum theory with the latest counterculture delights from LSD to Eastern mysticism to ESP. They received generous media attention, including a Time cover story and produced a flood of publications about the "new physics" including bestsellers such as Fritjof Capra's The Tao of Physics. With financial support from unexpected sources such as the CIA (worried about possible Soviet PSI weapons) and various young millionaires including Werner Erhard, they explored complex, hitherto ignored areas such as Bell's theorem and quantum entanglement while annoying the establishment by exploring their links to the paranormal. The end result was a transformation in cutting-edge physics and major discoveries in quantum information science, now a thriving industry.

Readers will enjoy this entertaining chronicle of colorful young scientists whose sweeping curiosity turned up no hard evidence for psychic phenomena but led to new ways of looking into the equally bizarre quantum world.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393342314
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
07/16/2012
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
416
Sales rank:
506,797
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

David Kaiser is a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he teaches in the Program in Science, Technology, and Society and the Department of Physics. He lives near Boston.

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How the Hippies Saved Physics: Science, Counterculture, and the Quantum Revival 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This explains why physics became so much abstract dreamstuff that is only demonstrable if one indugles in very unscientific practices. And it explains why, after graduating from college, I became an engineer.