How the States Got Their Shapes

How the States Got Their Shapes

4.0 20
by Mark Stein
     
 

ISBN-10: 0061431389

ISBN-13: 9780061431388

Pub. Date: 05/27/2008

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

Mark Stein is a playwright and screenwriter. His plays have been performed off-Broadway and at theaters throughout the country. His films include Housesitter, with Steve Martin and Goldie Hawn. He has taught at American University and Catholic University.

Overview

Mark Stein is a playwright and screenwriter. His plays have been performed off-Broadway and at theaters throughout the country. His films include Housesitter, with Steve Martin and Goldie Hawn. He has taught at American University and Catholic University.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061431388
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/27/2008
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
642,902
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.30(d)

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments     xi
Introduction     xiii
Don't Skip This     1
Alabama     11
Alaska     18
Arizona     21
Arkansas     27
California     33
Colorado     39
Connecticut     44
Delaware     52
District of Columbia     59
Florida     65
Georgia     70
Hawaii     75
Idaho     79
Illinois     86
Indiana     92
Iowa     95
Kansas     101
Kentucky     108
Louisiana     113
Maine     119
Maryland     126
Massachusetts     134
Michigan     141
Minnesota     145
Mississippi     151
Missouri     156
Montana     163
Nebraska     168
Nevada     174
New Hampshire     179
New Jersey     185
New Mexico     192
New York     197
North Carolina     206
North Dakota     216
Ohio     220
Oklahoma     226
Oregon     231
Pennsylvania     236
Rhode Island     243
South Carolina     248
South Dakota     253
Tennessee     257
Texas     263
Utah     270
Vermont     276
Virginia     281
Washington     288
West Virginia     293
Wisconsin     297
Wyoming     302
Selected Bibliography     305
Index     315

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How the States Got Their Shapes 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lots of great information in this book. Occasionally I'd like there to have been more depth, but that's not really what this book is about. It gives you a starting point if you want to explore more of the fascinating and quirky history regarding many of the shapes of the states. Many of the borders are based on rivers, but also on the Dutch, English, various wars, various treaties, discovery of gold and silver, the Missouri Compromise and Slave vs. Free states, and Congress's desire for 'equality' of width and height.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting histories of all 50 states told in an easy reading and inormative format. I might have liked a bit more info slightly enlagring the chapters. The author answer most questions we probably hadn't thought about. I found in especially interesting as my wife and i took a 10,300 mile cross-country trip earlier this year.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's a useful and enjoyable book, written for the average reader and not the professional. Only one thing has really disappointed me: Stein doesn't explain how Georgia manage to retain on its border with Alabama the entire Chattahoochee River to the high water mark on the west bank. It seems grossly unfair to Alabama, and I'm curious why Congress allowed it.
BKWorm7 More than 1 year ago
Haven't you ever wondered how the states got their respective shapes, especially those that don't seem to have classic shapes, such as West Virginia or Washington? This book answers all those questions and more. It discusses many American wars and how those affected specific shapes as well as how Congress determined the shapes for others. A very informative read that answers those burning questions that nobody taught in a history class.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
i have watched the TV version of this book and enjoy it immensely. the host is engaging and keeps my interest. the grandkids are fascinated by it, too. unfortunately, the book is dry and too "grown up" for elementary school children. maybe an updated edition with more colorful illustrations to capture the interest of a younger audience . . . i think this book could be a great training aid for children who are home schooled.
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JIMPNY More than 1 year ago
too bad the author cannot write in an engaging manner. A tough and boring read at best.