How the States Got Their Shapes Too: The People Behind the Borderlines

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How the States Got Their Shapes Too: The People Behind the Borderlines

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Library Journal

Stein, Mark. How the States Got Their Shapes Too: The People Behind the Borderlines. Smithsonian. Jun. 2011. c.360p. illus. maps. index. ISBN 9781588343147. $24.95. HIST
In an evocative sequel to his popular How the States Got Their Shapes, Stein presents a plentitude of varied and compelling biographical sketches associated with the setting of our national boundaries. The personalities, both the notable (e.g., Thomas Jefferson, Daniel Webster, Ethan Allen, Charles Mason, and Jeremiah Dixon) and the more obscure (Zebulon Butler, Clara Nichols, John Meares) and their agendas are central to the book. Readers are reminded that under President James K. Polk, U.S. boundaries grew exponentially to include Texas and all lands between the Rockies and the Pacific, producing a colossal headache for Congress and a dilemma largely solved by such outsize local personalities as Sam Houston and Brigham Young. The author also treats lands we attempted to annex but lost: Canada, the remainder of Mexico, Cuba, and the persistent issue of Puerto Rico. Readers will be inspired by Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton’s dogged campaign to win statehood for the District of Columbia. VERDICT Stein’s major and minor vignettes are well chosen from a wide array of primary and secondary sources. The book offers a perfect blend of optimism, tongue-in-cheek humor, and universal appeal. A winning effort.—John Carver Edwards, Univ. of Georgia Libs., Cleveland

Booklist

Stein’s How the States Got Their Shapes (2008) described why the American states look the way they do—how their borders landed where they did. This equally informative follow-up puts the spotlight on the people responsible for shaping those borders. People like Roger Williams, the Puritan minister who was expelled from the Massachusetts Bay Colony for advocating against the Church of England and established the township of Providence at the tip of the bay, and Anne Hutchinson, also banished, who secured the rights to a small island called Aquidneck by the Indians and Rhode Island by the British. Or—and this is a curious one—Robert Jenkins, the sea captain whose severed ear played a key role in establishing the boundary between Florida and Georgia. Stein, a playwright and screenwriter, writes history the way it should be written, as an entertaining story and not merely a tedious list of names, dates, and places. This is a very interesting follow-up to the earlier book, but it works equally well as a stand-alone.— David Pitt

Kirkus Reviews

A fun sequel offers more recondite tidbits of American history.

With 50 states, there are plenty of details about border controversies for this mildly titillating follow-up to screenwriter Stein’s How the States Got Their Shapes (2008), which in turn inspired the History Channel’s eponymous documentary. The personalities behind the disputes take center stage: Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, who were actually a pair of highly accomplished English surveyors of the Royal Society possibly hired by Benjamin Franklin to establish impartially the disputed 300-mile Pennsylvania-Maryland-Delaware boundary. “Asking Mason and Dixon to survey a boundary in America,” writes the author, “was… akin to asking Mozart to play at a prom.” Thanks to Ethan Allen (“not a furniture maker”) and his motley posse of Green Mountain Boys, the homesteads making up the future Vermont were saved from rapacious New Yorkers. It is largely due to the zeal (or wealth) of John Hardeman Walker who “put the boot heel on Missouri” in order to keep his land from sinking into Arkansas. Under the presidency of James K. Polk, America’s borders increased greatly, incorporating Texas, the Oregon Territory and everything in between the Rockies and the Pacific, creating a massive befuddlement for lawmakers; bright lights such as Sam Houston, Brigham Young and John Sutter would all wield profound influence on the shape of the states affiliated with their names. Stein includes contributions by important women, including proto-feminist Clarina Nichols, who moved her family to Kansas for the purpose of creating an anti-slavery majority in 1854, and Representative Eleanor Holmes Norton, who attempted tirelessly to win statehood for the District of Columbia. Overall, the author provides plenty of good stuff for tournament quizzes and Jeopardy questions.

Bright, readable and accessible for all ages.

From the Hardcover edition.

Library Journal
In an evocative sequel to his popular How the States Got Their Shapes, Stein presents a plentitude of varied and compelling biographical sketches associated with the setting of our national boundaries. The personalities, both the notable (e.g., Thomas Jefferson, Daniel Webster, Ethan Allen, Charles Mason, and Jeremiah Dixon) and the more obscure (Zebulon Butler, Clara Nichols, John Meares) and their agendas are central to the book. Readers are reminded that under President James K. Polk, U.S. boundaries grew exponentially to include Texas and all lands between the Rockies and the Pacific, producing a colossal headache for Congress and a dilemma largely solved by such outsize local personalities as Sam Houston and Brigham Young. The author also treats lands we attempted to annex but lost: Canada, the remainder of Mexico, Cuba, and the persistent issue of Puerto Rico. Readers will be inspired by Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton's dogged campaign to win statehood for the District of Columbia. VERDICT Stein's major and minor vignettes are well chosen from a wide array of primary and secondary sources. The book offers a perfect blend of optimism, tongue-in-cheek humor, and universal appeal. A winning effort.—John Carver Edwards, Univ. of Georgia Libs., Cleveland
Kirkus Reviews

A fun sequel offers more recondite tidbits of American history.

With 50 states, there are plenty of details about border controversies for this mildly titillating follow-up to screenwriter Stein'sHow the States Got Their Shapes (2008), which in turn inspired the History Channel's eponymous documentary. The personalities behind the disputes take center stage: Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, who were actually a pair of highly accomplished English surveyors of the Royal Society possibly hired by Benjamin Franklin to establish impartially the disputed 300-mile Pennsylvania-Maryland-Delaware boundary. "Asking Mason and Dixon to survey a boundary in America," writes the author, "was... akin to asking Mozart to play at a prom." Thanks to Ethan Allen ("not a furniture maker") and his motley posse of Green Mountain Boys, the homesteads making up the future Vermont were saved from rapacious New Yorkers. It is largely due to the zeal (or wealth) of John Hardeman Walker who "put the boot heel on Missouri" in order to keep his land from sinking into Arkansas. Under the presidency of James K. Polk, America's borders increased greatly, incorporating Texas, the Oregon Territory and everything in between the Rockies and the Pacific, creating a massive befuddlement for lawmakers; bright lights such as Sam Houston, Brigham Young and John Sutter would all wield profound influence on the shape of the states affiliated with their names. Stein includes contributions by important women, including proto-feminist Clarina Nichols, who moved her family to Kansas for the purpose of creating an anti-slavery majority in 1854, and Representative Eleanor Holmes Norton, who attempted tirelessly to win statehood for the District of Columbia. Overall, the author provides plenty of good stuff for tournament quizzes andJeopardyquestions.

Bright, readable and accessible for all ages.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781588343505
  • Publisher: Smithsonian Institution Press
  • Publication date: 5/29/2012
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 622,259
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface vii

Acknowledgments x

The Boundary of Religion Roger Williams 1

Why We Have Delaware Augustine Herman 7

Fifteen Minutes of Fame Robert Jenkins's Ear 13

Winning New Hampshire Robert Tufton Mason 17

What You Know or Who You Know? Lord Fairfax 25

America's Most Famous (and Misunderstood) Line Mason Dixon 30

Connecticut's Lost Cause Zebulon Butler 37

Vermont: The Fourteenth Colony Ethan Allen 43

Lines on the Map in Invisible Ink Thomas Jefferson 50

The U.S. Line from Spanish Canada John Meares 59

To Be Brilliant and Black in the New Nation Benjamin Banneker 66

The Erie Canal and the Gush of Redrawn Lines Jesse Hawley 72

The Man History Tried to Erase James Brittain 79

From Zero To Hero? Reuben Kemper 85

The 49th Parallel: A New Line of Americans Richard Rush 92

Illinois's Most Boring Border Nathaniel Pope 100

Putting the Boot Heel on Missouri John Hardeman Walker 107

The Massachusetts Texan John Quincy Adams 112

The Cherokee Line Sequoyah 117

The Toledo War Stevens T. Mason 125

Ohio Boundary Champ Takes on Missouri and Minnesota Robert Lucas 133

Maine's Border: The Devil in Daniel Webster Daniel Webster 142

Fifty-Four Forty or Fight! James K. Polk 151

Cutting Washington Down to Size Robert M. T. Hunter 160

The Man Who Lassoed Texas Sam Houston 168

The Boundary of Religion Revisited Brigham Young 180

California: Boundless Opportunity John A. Sutter 187

Government Aid to Big Business James Gadsden 195

The Line on Slavery: Erasing and Redrawing Stephen A. Douglas 201

Annexing Cuba: Liberty, Security, Slavery John A. Quitman 211

Using Boundaries to Break Boundaries Clarina Nichols 219

The British-American Pig War Lyman Cutler's Neighbor's Pig 224

Rocky Mountain Rogue? Robert W. Steele 230

The Battle Line That Became a State Line Francis H. Pierpont 234

Two Sides of the Coin of the Realm Francisco Perea John S. Watts 244

Good as Gold Sidney Edgerton James Ashley 251

Why Buy Alaska? William H. Seward 256

The Legal Boundary of Humanity Standing Bear v. Crook 261

Bordering on Empire Lili'uokalani Sanford Dole 272

Oklahoma's Racial Boundaries Alfalfa Bill Murray Edward P. McCabe Chief Green McCurtain 280

New Jersey Invades Ellis Island Bernard J. Berry 288

Puerto Rico: The Fifty-First State? Luis Ferré 293

When the Grass Is Greener on the Other Side David Shafer 299

Taxation without Representation Eleanor Holmes Norton 304

Notes 313

Index 331

Photography Credits 348

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