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How the Sun Got to Coco's House
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How the Sun Got to Coco's House

by Bob Graham
 
Follow the journey of the sun across the world from a whale’s eye to a little girl’s window in Bob Graham’s tender, transcendent story.

While Coco sleeps far away, the sun creeps over a hill and skids across the water, touching a fisherman’s cap. It heads out over frozen forests, making shadows in a child’s footprints, and

Overview

Follow the journey of the sun across the world from a whale’s eye to a little girl’s window in Bob Graham’s tender, transcendent story.

While Coco sleeps far away, the sun creeps over a hill and skids across the water, touching a fisherman’s cap. It heads out over frozen forests, making shadows in a child’s footprints, and balances on an airplane’s wing for a little boy to see. The sun crosses cities and countrysides, wakes furry creatures, makes a desert rainbow, and barges into Coco’s room to follow her through a day of play. With an eye for capturing small moments of shared experience, Bob Graham illuminates the natural wonder that comes with every new day.

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review - Maria Russo
…ingenious…Graham brings a pleasingly light touch to a momentous concept, with vivacious illustrations and a globe-spanning trot of a story.
Publishers Weekly
07/13/2015
Conveying a tone of quiet wonder, Graham’s travelogue imagines the daily journey of the sun as it makes its way to one girl’s home. As Coco is tucked into bed, the sun rises above a polar bear and two cubs on the other side of the world. The glowing yellow orb “skid giddily across the water” and continues on, bringing seasonal light and shadow to animals, children, and families in crowded cities, frozen forests, villages, and deserts. At last, “the winter sun barged straight through Coco’s window!” and she and her dog, parents, friends, and neighbors bask in its rays for a day of outdoor fun. A combination of wide panels and expansive spreads, many from a bird’s-eye perspective, bring a lofty visual flow to Graham’s airy watercolors. In the soft wash of hues that form the backdrop to most of the scenes, Graham (Vanilla Ice Cream) captures the moment of daybreak with gray-blue and rosy pink ceding to bright yellow across the sky. Seeing the same instant from widely dispersed viewpoints will elicit a sense of both familiarity and discovery for readers. Ages 4–6. (Sept.)
From the Publisher
The drawings are deftly unfussy, with an easy command of the watercolors. Their deliberate pacing recalls Mitsumasa Anno, and in their grand compass they are like a big, Whitmanesque hug...It's great to be able to count on something; readers can count on both the sun and Graham.
—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

In the soft wash of hues that form the backdrop to most of the scenes, Graham (Vanilla Ice Cream) captures the moment of daybreak with gray-blue and rosy pink ceding to bright yellow across the sky. Seeing the same instant from widely dispersed viewpoints will elicit a sense of both familiarity and discovery for readers.
—Publishers Weekly

...its viewpoint fits naturally with kids’ tendency to put themselves at the center of the universe.
—Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

As always...[Graham] excels at capturing small moments of humanity...
—The Horn Book

Graham’s beautifully illustrated tale conveys with exquisite simplicity that the world is shared, its sunlight a gift for everyone.
—The Washington Post

In this joyous celebration of the world, the sun travels to a special child.
—Booklist Online

Children's Literature - Meredith Kiger
This imaginative story is really about the sun and its daily journey around the world—a journey that is magical and mostly taken for granted. Of course, the journey has no end or beginning; but here it starts in the polar region, moving across the east touching and affecting animals and people in villages, cities, and countrysides of every corner of the globe. It finally reaches through the window of Coco’s room to awaken her and make her day enjoyable. This unique approach to an otherwise mundane activity forces the listener to rethink the beauty of it all and the importance to everyone. The clever cartoon-like drawings from various perspectives, afford the reader a fresh perspective, as well as a unifying one with various cultures experiencing something in common. It is an occurrence in wonder, something sorely needed. A wonderful picture book. Reviewer: Meredith Kiger, Ph.D.; Ages 4 to 7.
Kirkus Reviews
★ 2015-06-29
The sun takes readers on a world tour as it makes its way to each new dawning horizon. It is dark when Coco crawls into bed for the night, but the sun is getting busy elsewhere. It greets polar bear cubs and a fishing vessel in the cold northern waters. It reflects off a whale's eye and the bell of the paperboy's bicycle. It lights the way through a Siberian forest, heats a yurt, crawls down an alley in China, "and waited patiently outside an old lady's window to be let in." The sun sparks a rainbow and dazzles a puddle. Then, sure as the world turns, it crawls in through Coco's window, joins the family for breakfast, and after "such a dash, the sun had time on its hands. So did Coco! So did Coco's friends!" Graham brings a little sentiment to the procession but only enough to light sympathy for all the characters on parade. The drawings are deftly unfussy, with an easy command of the watercolors. Their deliberate pacing recalls Mitsumasa Anno, and in their grand compass they are like a big, Whitmanesque hug. The story ends with a bird's-eye view of a factory town, a shaft of sunlight slicing down to Coco's yard and a new snow having fallen, with hoses and lawn mowers caught by surprise. It's great to be able to count on something; readers can count on both the sun and Graham. (Picture book. 4-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763681098
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
09/22/2015
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
620,682
Product dimensions:
9.90(w) x 11.40(h) x 0.60(d)
Lexile:
AD650L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Bob Graham is the author-illustrator of many extraordinary books for children, including How to Heal a Broken Wing and The Silver Button, about which School Library Journal said in a starred review, "Graham celebrates what can happen in a single moment and reminds readers to pause and observe." Bob Graham lives in Australia.

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