How the World Became a Stage: Presence, Theatricality, and the Question of Modernity

How the World Became a Stage: Presence, Theatricality, and the Question of Modernity

by William Egginton
     
 

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What is special, distinct, modern about modernity? In How the World Became a Stage, William Egginton argues that the experience of modernity is fundamentally spatial rather than subjective and proposes replacing the vocabulary of subjectivity with the concepts of presence and theatricality. Following a Heideggerian injunctive to search for the roots of epochal change… See more details below

Overview

What is special, distinct, modern about modernity? In How the World Became a Stage, William Egginton argues that the experience of modernity is fundamentally spatial rather than subjective and proposes replacing the vocabulary of subjectivity with the concepts of presence and theatricality. Following a Heideggerian injunctive to search for the roots of epochal change not in philosophies so much as in basic skills and practices, he describes the spatiality of modernity on the basis of a close historical analysis of the practices of spectacle from the late Middle Ages to the early modern period, paying particular attention to stage practices in France and Spain. He recounts how the space in which the world is disclosed changed from the full, magically charged space of presence to the empty, fungible, and theatrical space of the stage.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780791455463
Publisher:
State University of New York Press
Publication date:
10/28/2002
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
216
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.60(d)

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