How Things Work in the House

How Things Work in the House

by Lisa Campbell Ernst
     
 

In How Things Work in the House, Lisa Campbell Ernst delves into how common household objects—such as soap, scissors and house keys—work. The detailed, but easy-to-understand, language describes the functioning of everyday items, and Ernst's meticulous and cleverly labeled pictures are fascinating. How Things Work in the House is a marvelous

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Overview

In How Things Work in the House, Lisa Campbell Ernst delves into how common household objects—such as soap, scissors and house keys—work. The detailed, but easy-to-understand, language describes the functioning of everyday items, and Ernst's meticulous and cleverly labeled pictures are fascinating. How Things Work in the House is a marvelous companion to the much-praised How Things Work Around the Yard. It also stands on its own as kid-compelling non-fiction.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for How Things Work in the Yard:
"Ernst's layouts achieve an artfully composed balance, offering plenty to interest young readers without confusing them." —The New York Times

"There's a playful aesthetic in evidence, from the bright palette and friendly cut-paper artwork to the innate humor in some of the questions themselves ("How does a squirrel work?")... It's an elegantly designed primer to the natural world." — Publishers Weekly

"Best of all, this unpretentious guidebook encourages curiosity and conversations about science."
School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Marcie Flinchum Atkins
Do you know a curious young child who is always asking "why" or "how" questions? This is a book that will deliver the answers. Everyday items are presented in this book like a banana, toothbrush, mirror, a straw, scissors, and many more. Each item is explained with a page full of short facts. Some of the facts are simple and obvious like the definition of a banana. But other facts are more fascinating and unique like the fact that people rub the inside of a banana skin on mosquito bites to stop the itch. Chances are, even the adult reader will learn some things that he or she did not know before. Some of the objects covered go into intricate detail about their parts. For example, all of the proper names for each part of the stapler are labeled. Craft ideas and easy snack recipes are also included. Illustrations are created with cut paper collage and give each spread a clean and easy-to-follow look. Highly recommended for the curious kid. Reviewer: Marcie Flinchum Atkins
School Library Journal
PreK-Gr 3—This simple and graphically appealing book capitalizes on the types of questions kids ask. Similar to How Things Work in the Yard (Blue Apple, 2011), it focuses on 25 common household objects. More traditional subjects like faucets, staplers, straws, and nightlights are interspersed with the less-likely topics such as Teddy bears, piggy banks, and sandwiches. In addition to short facts, ideas relating to the topic include recipes, crafts, and activities. A discussion of soap focuses on washing hands, while information about how a kazoo works includes a technique for making one with waxed paper and a comb. Especially charming are the cut-paper illustrations; they are exceptionally clear and colorful. Librarians creating flannel boards might take note of the layering technique here. Children will be drawn to the art and will be inspired to ask more questions.—Janet S. Thompson, Chicago Public Library
Kirkus Reviews
All of the household items you take for granted are explained in this colorful and handy volume. Following her How Things Work in the Yard (2011), Ernst comes indoors. Ever wonder how your toilet works? A faucet? A straw? Ernst offers simple answers with engaging illustrations. Writing for a young audience, she mostly explains what can be done with things in our houses. "How does a banana work?" begins the volume, showing the varied uses of the humble banana: rubbing the inside of the skin on mosquito bites; using the leaves for making rugs, ropes and "fancy kimonos"; dipping it in chocolate for a tasty treat. Spoons are not just the workhorse of the utensil drawer; they can be used to make catapults, puppets, musical instruments and mirrors. Similarly, popcorn, sandwiches, scissors, glue, piggy banks and kazoos are featured. The youngest readers will be fascinated by the simple explanations, the bright and whimsical illustrations, and the pleasing design of the volume. Children will begin by browsing and soon find themselves pulled into the stories behind the objects they thought they knew. A good glimpse at how things work in our houses and a great way to encourage children to wonder about their everyday worlds. (Nonfiction. 5-9)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781609051891
Publisher:
Blue Apple Books
Publication date:
05/22/2012
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
664,631
Product dimensions:
8.20(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Lisa Campbell Ernst grew up in Oklahoma, spent nine years in New York City, and now lives in Kansas City, Missouri. She has written and illustrated more than twenty children's books. The author lives in Kansas City, Missouri.

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