How Tia Lola Learned to Teach

How Tia Lola Learned to Teach

by Julia Alvarez
     
 

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Tía Lola has been invited to teach Spanish at her niece and nephew’s elementary school. But Miguel wants nothing to do with the arrangement. He hasn’t had an easy time adjusting to his new school in Vermont and doesn’t like living so far away from Papi, who has a new girlfriend and an announcement to make. On the other hand, Miguel’s… See more details below

Overview

Tía Lola has been invited to teach Spanish at her niece and nephew’s elementary school. But Miguel wants nothing to do with the arrangement. He hasn’t had an easy time adjusting to his new school in Vermont and doesn’t like living so far away from Papi, who has a new girlfriend and an announcement to make. On the other hand, Miguel’s little sister, Juanita, can’t wait to introduce her colorfully dressed aunt with her migrating beauty mark to all her friends at school—that is, if she can stop getting distracted long enough to remember to do so. Before long, Tía Lola is organizing a Spanish treasure hunt and a Carnaval fiesta at school. Will Miguel be willing to join the fun? Will Juanita get her head out of the clouds and lead her classmates to victory in the treasure hunt?
Told with abundant humor and heart, Julia Alvarez’s new Tía Lola story is the long-awaited sequel to the beloved How Tía Lola Came to Visit Stay.



From the Hardcover edition.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 3–6—This sequel to How Tía Lola Came to Visit/Stay (Knopf, 2001) continues the story of the Guzman family: 8-year-old Juanita, 10-year-old Miguel, and irrepressible Tía Lola. The new school year has begun and the children's aunt has been invited to teach Spanish a few days a week, a prospect that first alarms her since she never finished school when she was growing up in the Dominican Republic. But the woman is a born teacher, full of life, enthusiasm, and a wise saying for every situation. Lola quickly finds herself a favorite at school, charming all with her stories and personality, organizing parties and treasure hunts, and involving everyone in their small Vermont town in her plans. Along the way, she also helps Miguel and Juanita adjust to their parents' divorce, the separation from their father, who lives in New York City, and a possible new stepmother. When the residents of the town learn that Lola's immigration status is in jeopardy, they rally behind her to convince the judge the entire town needs their "Tía." Each chapter begins with one of Lola's maxims to set the stage, and Spanish words and phrases are clearly used throughout. A welcome return for a wonderful character whose heart encompasses the whole world.—Terrie Dorio, Santa Monica Public Library, CA
From the Publisher
“A welcome return for a wonderful character whose heart encompasses the whole world.” —School Library Journal

“Alvarez invites everybody-no matter their background-into this welcoming family and community.” —The Horn Book
Children's Literature - Traci Avalos
Tia Lola is new to the United States and does not have many friends yet, but Miguel and Juanita will save the day! They have a plan to get their aunt to take a job at their school teaching the students Spanish. Tia Lola is nervous because she does not have much experience in school. Will she be able to learn how to be a good teacher? This book is set up in ten chapters, each beginning with a moral in Spanish translated into English. Each chapter takes the perspective of one character, who must learn the chapter's lesson from their own life experiences. This book illustrates important topics like divorce, family, cultural values, heritage, growing up, and differences. All are shown through Tia Lola's experiences in getting over her fears of inadequacy and learning to teach. Students will empathize with the two children who have to deal with issues such as being different, divorce and remarriage, and becoming more responsible; and it is a good illustration that adults have fears as well. It is an excellent choice for teaching young children about the literary concept of morality, or to illustrate the thematic concepts of cultural values and differences. It is written in English with some Spanish words translated through context or directly in the story. Reviewer: Traci Avalos
Kirkus Reviews

In this sequel to How Tía Lola Came to (Visit) Stay (2001), the luminous Tía Lola reluctantly accepts an invitation to teach Spanish as a volunteer at her nephew and niece's elementary school. One year has passed since Tía Lola arrived in Vermont from the Caribbean. Miguel is in fifth grade, and he wants nothing but to start middle school. Juanita is in third grade and has her own troubles. Will they be happy having their own inimitable aunt teaching at their school? Using the charming voice of a third-person narrator and heading—and spicing up—each chapter with popular Spanish sayings, Alvarez creates a humorous and joyful story that can be read independently of the first Tía Lola story but that will leave readers eager for more of them. Within the tale, the author subtly touches on subjects that are relevant to the Latino population, such as immigration and bilingualism. An enjoyable read, not only for the amusing methods that Tía Lola uses to teach Spanish but for the sense of community and tolerance that breathes through her tale. (Fiction. 8-12)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375895845
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
10/12/2010
Series:
Tia Lola Stories
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
679,732
Lexile:
810L (what's this?)
File size:
2 MB
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

Buenas razones cautivan los corazones  
Good intentions win hearts    

"Mami, why is Tia Lola so scared to be a teacher?" Juanita wants to know. Mami is tucking her into bed. Juanita has been pleading for five more minutes so she can read another chapter in her book. But Mami has ruled that Monday through Thursday, lights must be out promptly by eight p.m. Otherwise, Juanita is too tired to pay attention the next day in class.  

Mami sighs. "I think Tia Lola doesn't feel confident because she never went past fourth grade."  

"I haven't gone past fourth grade either," Juanita reminds her.  

"I know, Juanita." Mami smiles fondly at her daughter. "But you're only eight. And Tia Lola, well, she's past fifty. She thinks she's not smart enough to teach the kids at your school."  

"But that's ridiculous, Mami!" Juanita says importantly. It feels so grown-up to be able to pronounce something ridiculous. "Tia Lola knows so much. All these stories and songs and sayings. And she knows how to cook and make friends and . . ." Juanita runs out of breath before she has run out of things Tia Lola knows how to do.  

"Would you do me a favor, Nita bonita?" Her mami always calls Juanita by her nickname and then adds the Spanish word for "pretty" when she is asking for something that will take extra effort. "Could you tell your tia Lola what you just told me? Tell her you'd love for her to come to your school. That it'll be just like taking care of you and Miguel, except that you'll have a few friends along. . . ."  

"Like seventy-four--sorry, seventy-six, counting Nita and me." Miguel is at the door. He must have overheard Mami discussing Mrs. Stevens's invitation.  

Mami looks at Miguel in that careful way, trying to figure out what he is feeling. She works at the college, counseling students who feel confused or troubled. Except Miguel isn't confused or troubled. He just thinks that adults should go to work somewhere besides where their kids go to school.  

"Do you not want Tia Lola to volunteer at Bridgeport?" Mami asks carefully.  

Miguel squirms. He's not sure he wants Tia Lola at his school every single day. But his mother is looking disappointed. "How about if Tia Lola just comes sometimes?" Miguel suggests.  

"You know, Miguel Angel Guzman, you might just have hit on a brilliant idea!"  

Miguel blinks in disbelief. "I have?"  

"He has?" Juanita echoes.  

Mami nods, ignoring the sparks flying between brother and sister. "I think it'll be less scary for Tia Lola to start by volunteering once a week, say. She can think of it as just visiting, not teaching. Then, once she gets used to it, she can go more often."  

From the Hardcover edition.

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