How to Be a Friend

How to Be a Friend

by Laurie Krasny Brown, Chopra, Marc Brown
     
 

The newest "Dino Life Guide for Families", this book talks about friendship. A reassuring text combined with humorous, full-color illustrations show everyday situations that children can relate to and understand. Best of all, this book presents the many ways to be a friend as well as the ways not to.

Overview

The newest "Dino Life Guide for Families", this book talks about friendship. A reassuring text combined with humorous, full-color illustrations show everyday situations that children can relate to and understand. Best of all, this book presents the many ways to be a friend as well as the ways not to.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Though several of their earlier Dino Life Guides for Families have dealt with issues that are ostensibly weightier (death, divorce), the Browns are clearly tuned in to children's universal belief that having friends and feeling included are matters of paramount importance. Here they offer common-sense advice to help preschoolers and early elementary students form social habits that will serve them well in subsequent years, when relationships with peers can be so much more complicated and potentially unsettling. Concrete examples, addressed directly to the reader and cheerfully illustrated with voice-bubble cartoons starring likable dinos, make both positive and negative concepts easy to grasp. The Browns balance "Ways to be a friend" (share, stand up for your pal when people make fun of him, go along with another's idea about what to play, compliment a playmate "even when she wins and you lose") with "Ways not to be a friend" (blame others for mishaps, quit when you're losing, insist that a friend play with you only). Spotlighting some unavoidable trouble spots, they impart valuable tactics for coping with rejection, shyness, arguments, etc. Text and art work well together to underscore the book's bottom line, that being a friend "means treating others the way you would like them to treat you!" Ages 4-8. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Dianne Ochiltree
Subtitled "A Guide to Making Friends and Keeping Them", this useful title features the wise dinosaurs from the highly acclaimed "Dino Life Guides for Families" series. It addresses various issues surrounding friendship that can help children, as well as their parents and teachers, develop good relationship skills. The book begins by explaining why we all need friendship, where to find friends, and how to be a good friend. The text emphasizes real-life emotions and situations as our dino-buddies experience the ups and downs of friendship. It also deals with a host of related difficulties-such as shyness and bullies-and offers sound advice on conflict resolution techniques. Marc Brown's full color illustrations nearly bounce off the page. Even the end papers feature funny and true thoughts on ways to be or NOT to be a friend that were contributed by a real-life third grade class. A panel of experts from education and psychology reviewed the text, and it would be a good addition to library, school or home bookshelves.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Similar in style to the Browns' Dinosaurs Divorce (Atlantic Monthly, 1986), this picture book offers kids practical suggestions about resolving arguments, getting over being shy, handling bossy children and bullies, and more. The easy-to-read text contains many examples of how to be a friend, each paired with a picture of two or more dinosaurs in that particular situation. For example, "You can protect a friend if someone starts bothering him" is illustrated with a dinosaur saying, "Stop it! Leave him alone!" to a bully. Marc Brown's colorful, whimsical cartoons are integral to the appeal of the book. The front endpapers feature suggestions from a third-grade class on "Ways to Be a Friend" ("Be helpful," "Take turns," etc.) along with drawings of happy dinosaur faces, while at the back, "Ways Not to Be a Friend" ("Make mean faces," "Call them a name they don't like," etc.) are illustrated with grumpy faces. While there are many wonderful stories that deal with friendship, few give direct advice to children about what to do and what not to do. Sure to be a hit without hitting readers over the head with message.-Esther C. Ball, Carver Elementary School, Newport News, VA
Kirkus Reviews
With simplicity and humor, barring all condescension, the Browns (When Dinosaurs Die, 1996, etc.) deliver the promise of the subtitle. Calling into duty the now-familiar green anthropomorphic dinosaurs of the other entries in the Dino Life Guides for Families, the Browns make the idea of friendship clear with scenes children will recognize: friends in front of the computer and the television, friends playing chess and basketball. The author explains that anyone can be a friend (and the pictures indicate that age, gender, and disabilities are no hindrance to friendship); that there are a lot of ways to be a friend, and that includes not only sharing but listening, not only helping but trusting. A clear description of how to handle an argument is nicely done; the advice about bosses and bullies is perhaps meager (asking a grown-up for help). The endpapers include quotes from members of a third- grade class on how to be a friend ("Call them by the names they want to be called") and how not to be one ("If you can do something and your friend can't, make a big deal about it"). (Picture book. 5-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316109130
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
09/01/1998
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.37(d)
Lexile:
140L (what's this?)
Age Range:
1 - 6 Years

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