How to Be a Monastic and Not Leave Your Day Job: An Invitation to Oblate Life by Benet Tvedten | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
How to Be a Monastic and Not Leave Your Day Job: An Invitation to Oblate Life

How to Be a Monastic and Not Leave Your Day Job: An Invitation to Oblate Life

4.0 2
by Benet Tvedten
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

You don't have to live in a monastery in order to live like a monk. Oblates are everyday people with jobs, families, and other responsibilities. Sometimes they are Catholic, sometimes not. In today's hectic, changing world, being an oblate offers a rich spiritual connection to the stability and wisdom of an established monastic community.

Overview

You don't have to live in a monastery in order to live like a monk. Oblates are everyday people with jobs, families, and other responsibilities. Sometimes they are Catholic, sometimes not. In today's hectic, changing world, being an oblate offers a rich spiritual connection to the stability and wisdom of an established monastic community.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Even as the number of religious (ordained monks and nuns) declines sharply in this country, lay monasticism is on the rise. "The number of oblates everywhere keeps growing and growing," says Tvedten, a monk at Blue Cloud Abbey in South Dakota who describes an oblate as someone who takes vows of spiritual commitment to a particular Benedictine monastery, but can have a regular job and a family. In this concise but informative book, Tvedten explains the foundation for oblate life-the Rule of Saint Benedict, a sixth-century guideline for spiritual growth in community. Benedict stressed a balanced life, with days spent praying the Divine Office (chanting the Psalms), reading devotional texts and working. Modern oblates do these things at home-some living hundreds of miles from the monastery with which they are affiliated-and visit the monastery regularly to meet with the monks and other oblates. After highlighting some core aspects of Benedictine spirituality (with some interesting forays into monastic history), Tvedten outlines how a person becomes an oblate, identifies religious communities within the United States that accept oblate members and explores simple principles for oblate life. (Feb.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher

IN RECENT YEARS I've seen a number of new books on monastic life, prayer and the application of Benedictine spirituality in the workplace. How to Be a Monastic and Not Leave Your Day job and Oblation, two of seven titles incorporating those principles that are currently available from Paraclete Press, specifically address the oblate vocation. As expressed in Brother Benet's title, the road to holiness traveled by vowed religious is open to anyone, and can be found wherever we are, regardless of age, race, sex, occupation (or lack thereof) or even marital status. Benedictine oblates are Christian men and women who affiliate with a specific Benedictine community. Through oblate programs organized by almost every monastery, these mostly laypeople learn from professional monastics (monks and nuns) how to apply the Rule of St. Benedict to their daily lives. Brother Benet, a monk of Blue Cloud Abbey in South Dakota and director of its oblate program, combines explanations of what is meant by Benedictine spirituality with practical examples of its implementation, contributed by oblates of various monasteries. "Christ is the chain that binds us," he says, "and we are all bound to one another." Section one on Benedictine spirituality shows how prayer, holy reading, work and relationships figure in the life of every monastic. Prominent among the spirituality Benedictine values for daily living in section two are peace and justice, and hospitality. Two uniquely Benedictine vows conversion of life and stability of heart-are discussed in section three on being an oblate. Although oblates do not take vows, we promise to practice these concepts. Also found in this section are a helpful history of the oblate movement and five simple guidelines for oblates, prepared over 30 years ago by a group of oblate directors. St. Anthony's Messenger November 1, 2006

These two books [Oblation: Meditations on St. Benedict's Rule by Rachel M. Srubas and How To Be a Monastic and Not Leave Your Day Job: An Invitation to Oblate Life by Brother Benet Tvedten] deserve dual consideration. Both issued by Paraclete, they make a powerful case for the revival of one of the less well known monastic traditions of the West, the "oblates," who, while remaining laypeople in a lay life, are affiliated with a monastic house by their adherence to some of the basic tenets of the Benedictine rule. Tvedten (director, Oblates, Blue Cloud Abbey, SD) explains the history of Benedictine monasticism simply but in some detail as well as the history of oblates and their place in contemporary monastic houses, both Catholic and non-Catholic Benedictine. Srubas, herself both a Benedictine oblate and a Presbyterian clergywoman, has written a collection of poem-like prayers and meditations directed at oblates and inspired by the Benedictine rule. These volumes cast fresh light on a little-known practice and should interest many readers. For most collections. Graham Christian Library Journal January 1, 2006

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781612610771
Publisher:
Paraclete Press
Publication date:
02/01/2006
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
674,335
File size:
399 KB
Age Range:
16 Years

Meet the Author

Brother Benet Tvedten entered Blue Cloud Abbey in Marvin, South Dakota in 1958. He has been his community's Director of Oblates for nearly thirty years, and held the position of Coordinator of the North American Association of Oblate Directors between 1995 and 1999. He is also the author of A View from a Monastery and How to Be a Monastic and Not Leave Your Day Job.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >