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How to Be an Ass-Whipping Boxer
     

How to Be an Ass-Whipping Boxer

4.0 2
by Champ Thomas, Ned Beaumont (Introduction)
 

When Champ Thomas was nearly sixty, he took on twenty challengers and beat them in less than fifteen minutes. This wasn't even a light workout for him, he'd say; in his time he'd taken on a hundered. Now this book offers you a step-by-step roadmap to success, whether you are a beginner, an amateur, a professional, or just someone who wants to know more about

Overview


When Champ Thomas was nearly sixty, he took on twenty challengers and beat them in less than fifteen minutes. This wasn't even a light workout for him, he'd say; in his time he'd taken on a hundered. Now this book offers you a step-by-step roadmap to success, whether you are a beginner, an amateur, a professional, or just someone who wants to know more about boxing and the art of self-defense. Have fun with this volume - there's a load of information in here if you follow Champ's advice and read each section carefully, perhaps more than once. "I've given perfect examples," he writes. "Now it's your job to surpass the perfection herein."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781559502054
Publisher:
Paladin Press
Publication date:
10/01/2000
Pages:
165
Product dimensions:
8.40(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.50(d)

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How to Be an Ass-Whipping Boxer 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book has different techniques than I've ever seen. It has some useful information and is very entertaining but I have difficulty with the stance. The author's 'Stonewall Defense' has your lead hand low to shield your body and your rear hand high, but not blocking your vision, to shield your face. I've had much better luck keeping both hands up, but not fixed in position. Champ really tries to sell his techniques as the best and downplays all others. The illustrations are cool. Beaumont's introduction is good, don't accept everything Champ says as the gospel truth but use what works best for YOU and there is plenty of valuable info presented. Champ was a carnival fighter, a trainer in the Navy during WWII, and a trainer as a civilian. He wasn't a professional to my knowledge, but was someone who would challenge all comers and make easy work of them. He was an expert at taking out amateurs and I'm sure a capable street fighter. The opponent shown in the book seems pretty unskilled and Champ's techniques exploit his shortcomings.